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5 Tips on How to Write From the Opposite Gender

5 Tips on How to Write From the Opposite Gender
Do you have male characters in your novel? Do you find it hard to really connect with them? They play video games, go outside, do sports, eat constantly, sleep all the time, and are major pranksters! Except not every guy is like that, just like not every girl likes dressing up, going shopping, doing her hair, and reading the latest teen magazine. So how can you, a girl, really establish a believable character from the opposite gender? Here are five super awesome tips that will help you write from a guy’s perspective! What kind of guy do you want? Avoid Stereotypes. FOR EXAMPLE: You believe all guys to be jerks so are going to make every guy in your novel like that. Talk to Real Guys. Quick Tip: Some questions to ask your guy interviewees are: 1. Don’t Limit Yourself. FOR EXAMPLE: If you’re a Percy Jackson fan, which we know many of you are, ask yourself, why do you love him so much? Observe How Guys Talk. Quick Tip: Take notes in school! Written By Nicole Klock

http://www.missliterati.com/blog/5-tips-on-how-to-write-from-the-opposite-gender

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