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Building Fictional Characters

Building Fictional Characters
The difference between Cody and Egbert One of the first things we need for a character is a name. It might not always hold true in real life, but in fiction, it's necessary most times for the name to fit the character. That's because -- right or wrong -- we all have preconceived ideas as to who a person is with a given name. If I'm speaking to a female over the phone, that I've never met before, and she introduces herself as Ursula, Scarlett, Desiree, or Hildegard, I get a picture of that person's appearance and character in my mind?I might be way off, but it's there. How to find names? My favorite book or all for this is the Character Naming Sourcebook, put out by Writer's Digest. After all is said and done, and all of those great names are jotted down on a piece of paper in front of you, I'm afraid no one else will be able to pick the name of each of your characters better than you. Here's a link to my very favorite character naming book.

http://www.charlottedillon.com/characters.html

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Definition of Third Person Omniscient Definition: Third person omniscient is a method of storytelling in which the narrator knows the thoughts and feelings of all of the characters in the story, as opposed to third person limited, which adheres closely to one character's perspective. Through third person omniscient, a writer may bring to life an entire world of characters. For instance, Anna Karenina is told from multiple points of view. Some sections are told from Anna's point of view: "All the same, he's a good man, truthful, kind and remarkable in his sphere," Anna said to herself, going back to her room, as if defending him before someone who was accusing him and saying that it was impossible to love him. 25 Things You Should Know About Word Choice 1. A Series Of Word Choices Here’s why this matters: because both writing and storytelling comprise, at the most basic level, a series of word choices. Words are the building blocks of what we do. They are the atoms of our elements.

Web Resources for Developing Characters When developing characters, many writers use personality traits that they see in themselves and in others, such as friends, family and celebrities. A new source of material and information that can help you develop characters is the Internet. The Internet offers some unique resources for character development, such as psychological testing websites, baby name databases and other reference sites and databases. These websites certainly weren't created for writers developing characters; nevertheless, these site are extremely useful for writers. This article will help you locate some of these useful resources, and give you some tips about how you can use them to develop your own characters.

Creating an Original Character By Maisha Foster-O'Neal You've heard the old maxim before... 'a character can make or break your story.' Writing Strong Argument Papers Writing Strong Argument Papers An argument or a persuasive paper has the power to make people change their minds about a topic, or allows them to really understand and accept your position as a valid one. You know how strongly people feel about their beliefs, so you can guess that writing a paper that will command the readers’ respect is challenging. So, in order to make strong arguments and to have the power to persuade people, follow some simple suggestions: Get oriented: 1. 7 Essential Elements of Character Creation Last week Nikki Jefford requested a post on developing characters. There are many different approaches toward developing characters for a story. Last year I wrote a post on different ways to get to know your characters which might help anyone getting started. The techniques I included were the use of visual aids, character questionnaires and family trees.

The Secret of Writing Funny Writing funny Do you want to learn the secrets of writing funny? Check out the five tips below. Laughter has instantaneous health benefits including relaxation, lowering blood pressure, curing male pattern baldness and increasing immune system response. Almost all of these health benefits can all be obtained by making your reader giggle, laugh, guffaw or otherwise shoot beverages out an unexpected orifice.

Establishing the Right Point of View by Marg Gilks "Dalquist was shaking with rage, tears streaking down her face. 'Get out,' she whispered. Then she lunged for the other woman, shrieking, 'Get out! How To Maximize Your Word Count And Write More Every Day Man, that blog title is soulless, isn’t it? I tried coming up with something funny — something about word vomit? something-something faster pussycat, write, write? — and it just wasn’t happening. So, despite sounding like some kind of mid-90s infomercial, I figure it’s best to just say what the post is actually about so we’re all on the same page and nobody thinks I’m going to vomit on them or throw inky-pawed cats at their head. Right?

Grammar Girl Mignon Fogarty is the creator of Grammar Girl and the founder and managing director of Quick and Dirty Tips. A magazine writer, technical writer, and entrepreneur, she has served as a senior editor and producer at a number of health and science web sites. She has a B.A. in English from the University of Washington in Seattle and an M.S. in biology from Stanford University. Mignon believes that learning is fun, and the vast rules of grammar are wonderful fodder for lifelong study. Self-Published Authors Helping Other Authors The antagonist or antagonists of a story are often the central driving force to the story or what causes the central driving force to come into being. That being said, a lot of thought has to go into creating an antagonist, especially the central antagonist. In fact, for horror novelists such as myself, it’s often one of the first things we come up with in a story, and what we often use to describe our stories to others (ex. “an evil clown demon terrorizes a small town”, “a cult leader with horrifying dark powers and those who stand against him”, “two children fall through a doorway to a world where the demonic ruler has a terrifying interest in the young boy”).*

Four Ways to Cut Your Novel's Draft (and Make Your Story Stronger) Image from Flickr by adrperez Is your novel looking a little bloated? Do you have a sneaking feeling you’ve repeated yourself a few times? Handling a Cast of Thousands - Part I: Getting to Know Your Characters by Will Greenway Few writing challenges are greater than doing justice to a large cast of characters in a novel or story. In fact, the difference between simply doing them justice and handling them well is a significant level of effort in itself. Sadly, this is one of those writer conundrums that is often best resolved with a "Don't do that if it hurts" solution.

Character Name Generator - Create Interesting and Plausible Character Names The simple automated character name generator below will help in your search for interesting and unique character names, male or female. Have you struggled to imagine a suitable name for your story or novel character? Maybe you've checked in baby books or have flipped through the phonebook looking for the right combination of names, and still you can't find one you like? Follow these suggestions for naming fictional characters and then have fun choosing one at the bottom of the page with the random character name generator. First, decide whether you'll refer to your character by his or her full name, first name, surname, or a nickname.

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