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Building Fictional Characters

Building Fictional Characters

8 Ways to Write Better Characters The very first novel I, aged 20-something, wrote, is unpublished and will stay that way. An ensemble coming-of-age story of four teenagers, its weaknesses are legion: tame story line, thin action, unimaginatively rendered settings, hackneyed themes (though I will say the dialogue wasn’t bad). Having now published seven novels, I look back on that manuscript and realize that underlying the shortcomings I just mentioned lies its principal flaw: poor character development. The kids just don’t pop. So I’ve been pleased to read reviews of my latest novels (the Rita Farmer mysteries) that praise the characterization—and I’ve been struck by the number of them that cite the realism of my characters’ relationships. Let’s consider, to start, the categories of relationships we might write in our fiction: Romantic Parent/Child Siblings Aggressor/Victim Rivals/Adversaries Best Friends Boss/Employee Caregiver/Receiver Cop/Criminal Partners (in business, crime, etc.) … and so many more. Here’s how. 1.

Writing Strong Argument Papers Writing Strong Argument Papers An argument or a persuasive paper has the power to make people change their minds about a topic, or allows them to really understand and accept your position as a valid one. You know how strongly people feel about their beliefs, so you can guess that writing a paper that will command the readers’ respect is challenging. So, in order to make strong arguments and to have the power to persuade people, follow some simple suggestions: Get oriented: 1. 2. 3. 4. Now You Can Start Writing 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Organize your paper 1. Model 1: Model 2: Model 3: Check your arguments for strength and logic: Are your arguments reasonable? ( a good source of information about this topic) Are you generalizing without sufficient data? Make corrections, and you are done! For more information, check Diana Hacker’s Bedford Handbook and your text for Composition class.

Ten Editing Tips, for Your Fiction Mss. | Margaret Atwood: Year of the Flood Speaking of writing, which we did a lot in Tofino: I put these together for a friend, but maybe someone out there could also use them… 1.The beginning. This is the key signature of the book. Sets the tone, introduces the leitmotifs. Are the people in it main characters? 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. Like this: Like Loading... Character Chart for Fiction Writers - EpiGuide.com If you're a fiction writer -- whether you're working on a novel, short story, screenplay, television series, play, web series, webserial, or blog-based fiction -- your characters should come alive for your reader or audience. The highly detailed chart below will help writers develop fictional characters who are believable, captivating, and unique. Print this page to complete the form for each main character you create. IMPORTANT: Note that all fields are optional and should be used simply as a guide; character charts should inspire you to think about your character in new ways, rather than constrain your writing. Fill in only as much info as you choose. If this character chart is helpful, please let us know! Looking for more character questionnaires / charts?

creative writing prompts . com ideas for writers Article of The Month This is a quick exercise designed to sketch out the major events of your novel. It only gives you a map-- you have to make the drive yourself! Get a kitchen timer or set your alarm. You're going to free-write for three minutes on several questions. Type or write the question, then set the clock, read the question allowed, and go. 1. 3. There's not enough money for costumes. 7. Okay, half hour's up. Answer 4 gives the protagonist's intended destination. # 6 lists obstacles to the resolution of the conflict. Just remember, your ending is going to help determine the message your reader will retain after closing the book, so make it fit your theme.

Attaching the Flesh: A Character Questionnaire | Rob D Young Characters easily make or break a story. It’s not about having a “good” or “bad” character; rather, it’s a difference of dimensions. To give your characters that third dimension of presence requires adding layers to who they are—patching sinews of flesh onto their waiting bones. Okay, that’s a bit morbid. The point is that it’s crucial that you take time to develop your characters. It’s 50 questions long (with bonus and sub-questions to boot), so I won’t be saying anything extra after the last question’s been asked. A Quick Disclaimer While this questionnaire will walk you through creating highly specific descriptions of your character’s appearance, beliefs, background, and personality, the idea is not to then include all these details in your story. The answers to these questions are resources—things to think about with your character which can be included or disregarded as you write. Now, on to the main event. The Fleshy Character Questionnaire Physical/Aesthetic Characteristics 1. 2. 3.

Grammar Girl Mignon Fogarty is the creator of Grammar Girl and the founder and managing director of Quick and Dirty Tips. A magazine writer, technical writer, and entrepreneur, she has served as a senior editor and producer at a number of health and science web sites. She has a B.A. in English from the University of Washington in Seattle and an M.S. in biology from Stanford University. Mignon believes that learning is fun, and the vast rules of grammar are wonderful fodder for lifelong study. Grammar Girl provides short, friendly tips to improve your writing. To book a lecture event with Mignon Fogarty for your company or organization, contact Macmillan Speakers. Follow Mignon on Google+, Twitter, Facebook, StumbleUpon, LinkedIn, and Pinterest. Awards Media The Oprah Winfrey Show, Grammar Girl Fixes Common Mistakes, March 2007 "Mignon has come up with clever ideas to help even the most grammatically challenged person remember the rules." New York Times, Book Not Ready for Print? Los Angeles Times

Lightning Bug Character Questionnaires - Get to Know Your Characters Receive more writing tips and advice (along with special offers and other Gotham news). One of the best ways to get to know your characters is to ask questions about them. Many writers do this as a kind of homework before they actually start writing a story. The more you know your characters, the fuller they will be. This might also make your story easier to write. The following questionnaires may be downloaded so you can work with the actual documents. Character Questionnaire 1 This questionnaire is found in Gotham Writers Workshops Writing Fiction. You might start with questions that address the basics about a character: What is your characters name? What is your characters hair color? What kind of distinguishing facial features does your character have? Does your character have a birthmark? Who are your characters friends and family? Where was your character born? Where does your character go when hes angry? What is her biggest fear? Does she have a secret? Look at your characters feet.

Be a better writer in 15 minutes: 4 TED-Ed lessons on grammar and word choice There’s no denying it — the English language can be mighty tricky. When writing a paper, a novel or even an e-mail, you might look at a sentence you just wrote and think, “Is that comma supposed to be there?” or “Is that really the best word to use?” First, let’s look at the often-confusing comma. What about the Oxford comma? Now, take an adjective such as “implacable” or a verb like “proliferate” or even another noun “crony,” and add a suffix, such as “-ity” or “-tion” or “-ism.” Finally, when it comes to good writing, don’t take the easy route!

Write or Die by Dr Wicked Character Chart a) If you could have two whole weeks for vacation and go and do anything you wanted, what and where would it be? b) If you had a weakness for one of the seven deadly sins, which one would it be and why? (pride, greed, lust, envy, gluttony, wrath, sloth) c) If you could bring one person back to life and spend a whole day with him or her, who would it be and why? d) If you won a three-million dollar lottery, what would you do with the money? What would you do with a five-hundred dollar win? e) If you could change one thing about yourself, what would it be? f) What do you do to relax after a bad day? g) Where would you go to hang out if you wanted to feel comfortable? h) What do you do when you are angry? i) Do you have a secret passion? j) How do you feel in a crowd? k) If you were asked to describe yourself, what would you say about the kind of person you are? l) Where do you want to be in your life ten years from now? m) A tear jerker is on. o) What do you think would make a perfect first date?

49 Story Starters & Writing Ideas for Elementary Kids Story Starters & Writing Ideas for Elementary Kids – Oh the many joys of journaling! I love to write about journaling tips, creative journaling and journal writing techniques. But I am most often asked for a listing of journaling topics and prompts. Writing in a journal is one of my very favorite activities, and I hope it is one of your student’s favorite activities, too. Elementary Writing and Journal Prompts and Story Starters for Kids So, without further ado… here’s an amazing list of elementary writing prompts and writing starters for your students! Imagine that you can become invisible whenever you wanted to? I am always looking to expand my listing of journaling prompts and would love to hear your ideas. May your student’s journaling adventure be filled with joy, fun and creativity. Happy journaling….

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