background preloader

The Female Character Flowchart

The Female Character Flowchart
Welcome to Overthinking It, the site that subjects the popular culture to a level of scrutiny it probably doesn't deserve. There's much more where this came from, so if you like this article: UPDATE: You can now buy your own poster of the Female Character Flowchart in the Overthinking It Store. Note: This flowchart was created with extensive help from Carlos A. Hann Commander, a guru of the Adobe Illustrator. At the risk of being called a penis-bashing dog-faced psycho feminazi* again, I’m going to talk about gender today! Before we get to the graphic itself, here are some explanations and caveats. This flowchart focuses on the one- and two-dimensional female characters we see over and over again in modern fiction.The graphic does not include every type of female character that has ever existed, but I did my best to focus on the most important tropes.Some of the listed tropes might be considered crazy-sexist, and others represent more positive stereotypes. And that’s it!

http://www.overthinkingit.com/2010/10/11/female-character-flowchart/

Related:  arianamcgrathCharacter CreationDevelopmentAdvice

10 Awesome Free Tools To Make Infographics Advertisement Who can resist a colourful, thoughtful venn diagram anyway? In terms of blogging success, infographics are far more likely to be shared than your average blog post. This means more eyeballs on your important information, more people rallying for your cause, more backlinks and more visits to your blog.

Body Language and Flirting - Blifaloo Interesting Info -> Body Language -> Flirting Body Language (part 1) Quick Jump: General Signs of Flirting | Male Flirting | Female Flirting Also See: Body Language Resources | Decoding Male Body Language Updated March 21st - 2012. New resources, information, books and links added. Only 7% of communication is verbal communication. Describing Your Character: Tips & Advice They say first impressions are the most important, and with characters that is definitely true. The way you describe your characters for the first time can make or break peoples' impressions of your characters and your story. So, here are some tips and advice on describing your characters in-story.

The Zero-Fuckery Quick-Create Guide To Kick-Ass Characters (And All The Crazy Plot Stuff That Surrounds ‘Em) When writers are tasked with creating characters, we are told to try these character exercises that entreat us to answer rather mad questions about them: hair color, eye color, toe length, nipple hue, former job, phone number of former job supervisor, what she had for lunch, if she were a piece of Ikea furniture what piece would she be (“Billy bookcase! NO WAIT, A SKJARNNGFLONG LINGONBERRY-FLAVORED COCKTAIL TRAY”). And so on and so forth.

15 Amusing and Creative Infographics to Delight Your Social Network Infographics are all the rage on social media—and they’re not going anywhere anytime soon. Contrary to predictions that infographics would saturate the blogosphere to the point of losing audience interest and impact, they are more popular now than ever before. According to a report published by the Social Media Examiner, 70 percent of marketers plan to increase their use of visuals such as infographics and memes during this year, while the use of infographics in B2B marketing increased from 9 to 52 percent in 2014. These are heartening figures, especially for those who appreciate all the unique qualities of this highly shareable content format: They’re visually attractive, easy to consume and provide loads of information in a few seconds.

What Jane Eyre Can Teach You About Mind-Blowing Heroines - The Procrastiwriter What Jane Eyre Can Teach You About Mind-Blowing Heroines How to craft a three-dimensional, empowered, compelling heroine? It’s a buzzing question, even among female authors. The Bechdel Test, which slaps the sexist label on any story that fails to feature at least two female characters discussing something other than a man, continues to be a hot topic. But what does all that really mean?

How to Make Characters Vulnerable Most tips for creating sympathetic characters point out that our characters need flaws. And that’s very true. But it can be a real trick to show flaws for characters who bottle up their emotions in an attempt to hide their weaknesses. While very common, that defense mechanism can leave very little for us, as authors, to show. In my own writing, my desire to create strong characters led me to sometimes emphasize how they didn’t let things bother them. The Serendipity Workshop: Lost on the Border at Twilight Finding — and Using — Your Life’s Essential Strangeness You mention a friend you haven’t heard from in twenty years . .. and three days later you receive an e-mail from that friend.Your child tells you who is on the other end of the phone . .. before you pick it up — or even stranger, right before it rings. Your car keys vanish, only to reappear an hour later, right where you thought you left them all along. Your dead publisher visits you in a dream and through an intermediary, gives you an angle on a story you’re writing that fixes the biggest problem you’ve been having with the story, and makes the conflict a million times better as a side benefit. We experience all sorts of little oddities in our lives — from deja vu to serendipity to bits and pieces of the purely inexplicable, we brush up against the borders of an unknown realm daily. Mostly, we ignore these tiny excursions into weirdness.

Memorable Minor Characters Everyone is the center of their own universe. Really, think about that for a moment. Each of us have our own lives, families, friends, memories, dreams and fears. We all have regrets and joys, disappointments and celebrations. On Writing Convincing Male Characters How do you write realistic male characters? That’s a question I often hear from women writers. Today, we’ll look at that and point you in the right direction, but let’s be clear that this is not something you’re going to learn overnight. Anna posted this question on my “Ask A Question For My Blog” page:

Things You Should Know About Your Character Previous iterations of the “25 Things” series: 25 Things Every Writer Should Know 25 Things You Should Know About Storytelling And now… Ten Steps to Finding Your Writing Voice Your job as a writer is much more than just selling your books, believe it or not. Your job — if you want to make a living at this, anyway — is to sell yourself. You are selling your unique perspective on life, your unique collection of beliefs, fears, hopes and dreams, your memories of childhood tribulation and triumphs and adult achievements and failures . . . your universe.

World Building 101 World Building 101 by Lee Masterson You are the ultimate creator of your fictional world. No matter where or when your story is set, regardless of what events unfold, and despite the characters you introduce to your readers, they are all products of your unique imagination. "But I write romance set in the present time," I hear you cry. It doesn't matter whether your story is set in 16th century Middle Europe, or the 28th century Altarian star-system, your story still belongs in a world created entirely by you. So, even though it can be great fun to invent strange sounding planets in distant galaxies, complete with lethal atmospheres and budding alien life-forms, there are still writers out there who would much prefer to deal with Earth as we already know it.

Creating Compelling Characters 1. Make the character exceptional at something. Give your character a trait or skill that makes him or her admirable in some way. It doesn’t have to be anything over-the-top. Maybe she’s an office manager…who is an amazing cook.

Related: