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14 things that are obsolete in 21st century schools

14 things that are obsolete in 21st century schools
Saying that it has always been this way, doesn’t count as a legitimate justification to why it should stay that way. Teacher and administrators all over the world are doing amazing things, but some of the things we are still doing, despite all the new solutions, research and ideas out there is, to put it mildly, incredible. I’m not saying we should just make the current system better… we should change it into something else. I have compiled a list of 14 things that are obsolete in 21st century schools and it is my hope that this will inspire lively discussions about the future of education. 1. Computer Rooms The idea of taking a whole class to a computer room with outdated equipment, once a week to practice their typewriting skills and sending them back to the classroom 40 minutes later, is obsolete. Computers or technology shouldn’t just be a specific subject, that’s not sufficient anymore but rather it should be an integral part of all the subjects and built into the curriculum. 2. 3. 4.

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I was actually thinking the reverse had happened!! Definitely Term Two - best of luck with application - if you can capture the pride , passion and knowledge you showed yesterday then it will be hard to beat :) by milkinsk Apr 9

It was great to catch-up. Somethings never change - you're still the smartest person in the room. Let's catch-up again during Term 2. My shout for lunch. by markag Apr 9

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