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Turning Students into Good Digital Citizens

21st Century Literacy | In Print Turning Students into Good Digital Citizens Schools have always been charged with the task of producing good citizens. But how has our definition of a "good citizen" changed over the ages? By John K. Waters04/09/12 Video Exclusive: Cultural anthropologist Michael Wesch at Kansas State University discusses the tools today's students need to be good digital citizens. In today's world of near-ubiquitous connectivity, in which ordinary people have almost instantaneous access to unlimited stores of information and the ability to interact with anyone, anywhere, anytime, what does it mean to be an effective citizen? Ask a K-12 educator these questions and chances are the answers will have something to do with teaching proper behavior and setting appropriate prohibitions. 'A Day-to-Day Skill Set' In his work, Kahne focuses on the connection between students' participation with digital media and their levels of civic engagement.

http://thejournal.com/articles/2012/04/09/rethinking-digital-citizenship.aspx

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7 Pillars Of Digital Leadership In Education 7 Pillars Of Digital Leadership In Education by Eric Sheninger, Principal at New Milford High School in New Jersey As schools change leadership must as well. With society becoming more and more reliant on technology it is incumbent upon leaders to harness the power of digital technologies in order to create school cultures that are transparent, relevant, meaningful, engaging, and inspiring. In order to set the stage for increasing achievement and to establish a greater sense of community pride for the work being done in our schools, we must begin to change the way we lead.

Interview: Sherry Turkle, Author of 'Alone Together' As soon as Sherry Turkle arrived at the studio for her Fresh Air interview, she realized she'd forgotten her phone. "I realized I'd left it behind, and I felt a moment of Oh my god ... and I felt it kind of in the pit of my stomach," she tells Terry Gross. That feeling of emotional dependence on digital devices is the focus of Turkle's research. Her book, Alone Together, explores how new technology is changing the way we communicate with one another. "The pull of these devices is so strong, that we've become used to them faster than anyone would have suspected," says Turkle, a clinical psychologist and the founder of MIT's Initiative on Technology and Self. Her research investigates how devices are changing the way parents relate to their children, how friends interact, and why many people — both young and old — keep their devices in-hand all the time — even as they sleep.

The Best Posts & Articles Explaining Why Schools Should Not Be Run Like Businesses It’s not uncommon to hear that our schools need to be run more like businesses. That argument holds a lot of appeal to some people (including, but not limited to, people who might make a profit out of it). I thought I’d bring together a few resources that provide a counterpoint to those beliefs. I’m starting off with a short list, and hope that readers will provide additional suggestions in the comments section of this post. You might also be interested in A Beginning “The Best…” List On The Dangers Of Privatizing Public Education. Who Are You Online? Considering Issues of Web Identity Wednesday (Feb. 6) is Digital Learning Day, an annual opportunity to contemplate the place of technology in the classroom and in our lives. Last year, we celebrated by digging through 40 years of New York Times reporting on technology in education to find gems like the 1982 article “Computers Alter Lives of Pupils and Teachers.” This year, we have a student essay challenge, and we have also invited a guest post from Common Sense Media, an organization “dedicated to improving the lives of children and families by providing the trustworthy information, education, and independent voice they need to thrive in a world of media and technology.” We collaborated with the Common Sense Media writer Kelly Schryver to focus on the increasingly important and nuanced question “Who Are You Online?” Below, Times and Learning Network content as well as offerings from Common Sense Media’s K-12 Digital Literacy and Citizenship curriculum for teaching and learning about this complex issue. Here is Mr.

What do students entering HE expect from digital technologies? When we come across new technologies or digital platforms for the first time in further and higher education (HE), how do we decide what the technology does or should do, and how we can use it to help us? In the digital student project we have been investigating incoming students’ expectations of the digital environment in HE. Institutions will be working to meet or manage expectations as hundreds of thousands of new students arrive in September but it’s no small task to build a picture of students’ hopes and aspirations when there are modules to rewrite and technology to update over the summer. Clearly experiences of digital technology while at school will be a major influence, so we have looked closely at the sort of technologies schools own and how they use it. In the classroom Coming to an understanding of the use of technology in schools wasn’t straight forward.

Bing Launches Its Election Site, Lets You Filter News By Political Perspective Better late than never. With less than two weeks to go before the U.S. presidential election on November 6, Microsoft’s Bing just unveiled Bing Elections. The site features news results from major U.S. publications that can be filtered by political preference (right, left, center), as well as an interactive map with election results and sentiment analysis across key issues based on data from Twitter and Facebook. It’s surprising that Bing is only launching this site so late in the game, but the result is actually quite interesting. Google, of course, had a bit of a head start here, as the company has been running its election hubs for quite a few U.S. and international election cycles now. For the most part, Google offers its users a bit more data to delve into.

Read to Feed Helps Kids Learn to Love Reading As parents and schools gear up for the school year, Heifer International wants you to know about its special reading incentive program for grade-school kids. Read to Feed helps teachers impart an ethic of global giving to kids while also fostering their reading skills. With Read to Feed, kids get so excited about giving animals to help children in poverty, they may not even realize they're also helping themselves by reading more. What's your digital footprint? Take this quiz and find out! I developed this quiz with members of my personal learning network (found at end of post) to get students thinking about their digital footprint. The quiz was created at the request of high school students I spoke with who thought the creation of a such a quiz could lead to a smart conversation about ways students can update their digital footprint so that it is one that leads to college and career success. Check it out with your students and let me know how it goes in the comments below. Per popular request, here is a link to the digital version of the quiz. Upon completion, quiz takers will receive a score.

OU Digital Tools: Connected Learning Infographic Thanks to Karen LaBonte, I learned about this amazing infographic about Connected Learning. You can see the jumbo-sized version of the graphic for details. I find it wonderful but overwhelming, so I decided to break it up into piece that I can cope with! Practically Applied: A Month of Creation in #digcit One of the struggles that I have had teaching computer classes and even adult professional development over the years is the artificial nature of the exercise. While there are a few notable exceptions and tried & true lessons, the teaching of computers is typically taught as a series of artificial "problems" and walk-through solutions. Students for the most part recognize this and go through the motions to a greater or lesser extent depending on how much they value their grades. Thus, when we decided to recast the curriculum for Computer Applications as a course in Digital Citizenship (#digccit) based heavily on the ISTE National Education Technology Standards for Students, one of our implicit goals was to make the student experience more real and more relevant.

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