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4 Essential Rules Of 21st Century Learning

4 Essential Rules Of 21st Century Learning
4 Essential Rules Of 21st Century Learning by Jennifer Rita Nichols The term “21st century” has become an integral part of educational thinking and planning for the future. Educators and administrators are actively searching for ways to prepare students for the future, and the educational system has been evolving faster than ever before. Various studies have shown us that rote memorization is not an effective learning strategy, and that teacher-centered classrooms may not be the most efficiently structured ones for student engagement. However, despite learning about the skills that students will need to develop to become successful in the 21st century, as well as what beliefs about education may be worth hanging onto or throwing away, schools and teachers are left trying to figure out what their role needs to be in the education of their 21st century students. Nowadays, we don’t live in the same world. So then, what is the role of education in the 21st century? Society has changed. 1. 2. 3.

http://www.teachthought.com/learning/4-essential-rules-of-21st-century-learning/

Related:  Spring 2017May 2016 Faculty Workshop21st Century LearnersVision and Innovation in Education21st Century Learning

Occam's razor - Wikipedia Andreas Cellarius's illustration of the Copernican system, from the Harmonia Macrocosmica (1660). The motions of the sun, moon and other solar system planets can be calculated using a geocentric model (the earth is at the centre) or using a heliocentric model (the sun is at the centre). Both work, but the geocentric system requires many more assumptions than the heliocentric system, which has only seven. This was pointed out in a preface to Copernicus' first edition of De revolutionibus orbium coelestium. In science, Occam's razor is used as a heuristic technique (discovery tool) to guide scientists in the development of theoretical models, rather than as an arbiter between published models.[1][2] In the scientific method, Occam's razor is not considered an irrefutable principle of logic or a scientific result; the preference for simplicity in the scientific method is based on the falsifiability criterion. History[edit]

7 Tools for Adding Questions and Notes to Videos Short videos from YouTube and other sources can be quite helpful in introducing topics to students and or reinforcing concepts that you have taught. Watching the video can be enough for some students, it's better if we can call students' attention to specific sections of videos while they are watching them. The following tools allow you to add comments and questions to videos that you share with your students.

Math, PBL and 21st Century Learning for All Students Considering project-based learning as a way to teach 21st century competencies? Or perhaps you have already used PBL in your schools and want support for your discussions with administrators, parents or board members? In either case, it might be helpful to know about the strong research evidence that PBL, when supported by good professional development, can in turn support the teaching and learning of 21st century skills significantly better than more traditional alternatives. Sometimes skeptics will argue that for certain subjects (e.g., math) or some types of students (e.g., lower performers) are harder to teach using PBL. They might enjoy this video of students building a house as an example of good teaching -- but not necessarily an example that could or should be followed.

Is 2016 The Year That Progressive Education Returns? - Is 2016 The Year That Progressive Education Returns? by Robert Sun The 1920’s were a high point in the Progressive Education movement. Developed in response to the rigid pedagogy of 19th Century industrial society—methods that stressed uniform learning largely defined by social class—Progressive Education sought to break the mold with a more enlightened approach to public schooling. Eight Ways of Looking at Intelligence Big Ideas In “Thirteen Ways of Looking At A Blackbird,” poet Wallace Stevens takes something familiar—an ordinary black bird—and by looking at it from many different perspectives, makes us think about it in new ways. With apologies to Stevens, we’re going to take the same premise, but change the subject by considering eight ways of looking at intelligence—eight perspectives provided by the science of learning. A few words about that term: The science of learning is a relatively new discipline born of an agglomeration of fields: cognitive science, psychology, philosophy, neuroscience. Its project is to apply the methods of science to human endeavors—teaching and learning—that have for centuries been mostly treated as an art.

The Death Of Expertise I am (or at least think I am) an expert. Not on everything, but in a particular area of human knowledge, specifically social science and public policy. When I say something on those subjects, I expect that my opinion holds more weight than that of most other people. I never thought those were particularly controversial statements.

Blended Learning Definitions The definition of blended learning is a formal education program in which a student learns: at least in part through online learning, with some element of student control over time, place, path, and/or pace;at least in part in a supervised brick-and-mortar location away from home;and the modalities along each student’s learning path within a course or subject are connected to provide an integrated learning experience. The majority of blended-learning programs resemble one of four models: Rotation, Flex, A La Carte, and Enriched Virtual. The Rotation model includes four sub-models: Station Rotation, Lab Rotation, Flipped Classroom, and Individual Rotation. 1.

21st-Century Projects Inspire Global Citizenship Plus Creativity Reforestation plan that was researched in a New York classroom led to 999 trees planted in Cormier, Haiti. Photo credit: Naima Penniman This is the second in a special Edutopia blog series about developing 21st century skills through project-based learning. What Achieving Digital Equity Using Online Courses Could Look Like By John Hansen and Justin Reich For almost a century, technology enthusiasts have promised that new innovations can democratize education. In 1932, Benjamin Darrow, founder of the Ohio School of the Air, argued that radio would “make universally available the services of the finest teachers.” In 1961, the Ford Foundation’s Teaching by Television report declared that TV would provide poor students with “instruction of a higher order than they might otherwise receive.” In our own time, advocates of online learning promise to level the educational playing fields with massive open online courses, MOOCs. The most compelling evidence for the democratizing power of MOOCs comes from a new generation of Horatio Alger stories, where the video lecture replaces the bootblack’s cloth.

3 Knowledge Domains For The 21st Century Student Thinking in the 21st century is just different. That doesn’t mean we’re all suddenly omnipotent cyborgs, nor does it mean we’ve all become mindless social media addicts that spend our cognitive might tapping, swiping, and drooling on our smartphone and tablet screens. But just as the 19th century presented unique challenges to information processing than the 18th or 20th, the 21st century is different than the one before, or that the one that will come after. punyamishra.com recently released the following graphic that I thought was interesting, mainly in that it identified knowledge types for modern learning, settling on Foundational, Humanistic, and Meta Knowledge. 3 Knowledge Domains For The 21st Century Student

Auntie Dogma's Garden Spot Perennial, Viola Tricolor Johnny Jump Ups are a popular viola. They are called “old fashioned” favorites. These perennials are often grown as an annual, especially in northern parts of the country. An Annotated List of Flipped Class Tools and Resources – Turn to Your Neighbor: The Official Peer Instruction Blog Flipped Class Tool and Resource List from Turn to Your Neighbor We will keep a (clearly very incomplete) list of tools and resources we use and/or discover relative to flipped teaching here. Help us grow this list using the form at the bottom of the page. We try to emphasize free tools on this page. There are many paid, inexpensive tools that we are big fans of including Screenflow (screencasting software) and Learning Catalytics (classroom response and assessment system). Turn to Your Neighbor!

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