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UX Apprentice

UX Apprentice
Tools like Balsamiq make it easier than ever to participate in the design of user interfaces, and that’s a great thing. The problem, as you may have already discovered, is that creating products that are easy to use is actually quite hard! Information architecture, interaction design, and copywriting are just a few of the elements involved. There’s a lot of art and science behind creating a lovable user interface. This site is designed to teach you the basics with an easy process to follow, and pointers for where to learn more. The process we illustrate has three layers: Discovery, Strategy and Design.

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Why White Space Is Crucial To UX Design All good visual artists understand the importance of negative space, the empty area that draws attention to, and accentuates, the actual subject. Negative space (the artistic equivalent of a designer’s white space) is like the supporting cast whose duty is to make the star of the show stand out more by not standing out so much themselves. If you don’t think any part of your design should be intentionally blank, take a look at the World’s Worst Website Ever for an extreme example of the damage caused by too many objects competing for attention. In interaction design, white space isn’t just an aesthetic choice— it serves three essential functions.

35+ Best Wireframing Tools and Templates With wireframing tools and templates you can work efficiently and flexible with website designs in the early phases where features and requirements are still being developed. As you know, a good start is often half done. In web design, it is tempting to start out pixel perfect design as early as possible and ship the PSD for being sliced and converted into HTML. However, best practice is to keep the level of detail in the design to an absolute minimum until you are clear on all the features and page elements. Once a design is drawn in Photoshop, it takes a lot of effort to make large turnarounds. UX: Psychology of great design – part 1 The World Wide Web turned 20 in April 2013. In its first 20 years the web matured from a largely static medium into the rich, collaborative and wonderfully interactive medium we know today. As such, the interactions and relationships between users and systems have become increasingly complex. Consequently, web designers need to understand the experience of the website or app they are making. Designers should consider who is using it, what they need to do and ultimately if the design makes their users’ experience easier or, ideally, more delightful.

Coding Goûter This is part of a short series of articles on Coding Goûter. Read them on ils.sont.la Coding Goûter – “Goûter” being the french for a children afternoon snack – is a monthly event where children and their parents put their hands on various programming tools, algorithmic games and puzzles, development environments, languages. A Digital Design Workflow: Tools in Review The world probably doesn’t need one more article about ever-changing design tools, but I’ve had a few people ask what I use in my work at Worthwhile and why, so here are a few thoughts on my current design tool chest and my process. It’s a great time to be doing graphic/web/ui design and prototyping because the competition is increasing, and the tooling options keep getting better and better. At the end of the day, our tools don’t matter nearly as much as the output—it’s the work that matters. In digital design, making only static comps is usually not enough anymore, but I doubt we’ll completely move beyond the need for static design ideation.

7 UX design tools for an effective Scrum workflow As of late we have been running more and more projects using the Agile Scrum method. In fact, our largest projects are almost all conducted in multidisciplinary Scrum teams. And very successfully! Formerly we primarily worked using the Waterfall project methodology, so we had to adjust our workflow. Gradually we have developed an effective way of working for interaction and visual designers within Scrum projects.

The Difference Between Information Architecture and UX Design Information architects form the blueprints of the web Next to explaining what I do for a living, the second question I most frequently hear is: “What’s the difference between Information Architecture and User Experience?” The line always seems to blur between the two, even though there’s clearly a difference. How should I go about explaining it?

FAQ about spec work What is spec work? Basically, spec work is any kind of creative work rendered and submitted, either partial or completed, by designers to prospective clients before taking steps to secure both their work and equitable fees. Under these conditions, designers will often be asked to submit work under the guise of either a contest or an entry exam on actual, existing jobs as a “test” of their skill. In addition, the designers normally unwittingly lose all rights to their creative work because they failed to protect themselves by means of a contract or agreement. The clients often use this freely-gained work as they see fit without fear of legal repercussion.

Designing Future-Proof UI – Medium Increasing The Longevity If we want our UI design to stand the test of time and go beyond the conventional expiry date, we can incorporate a number of principles into our workflow and way of thinking that will make it less likely to cause big changes in the future, or put another way, more likely to cause little change. This isn’t a definitive guide, but these principals can certainly go a long way.

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