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Playful UX Design: Building A Better Game

Playful UX Design: Building A Better Game
Advertisement I sincerely believe that the user experience community should add game design to its toolbox of competencies. If we’re truly committed to creating satisfying user experiences, then there’s no reason why games, which can satisfy people so richly, should be excluded. Operating successfully in the games domain means learning a new set of competencies, and I don’t want to oversimplify the challenges of designing high-quality game experiences. However, if you’re in a position to jump in and start designing, then I can at least offer a primer to help you steer clear of some of the most common mistakes. 1. Trading off the quality of the player experience in favor of some real-world objective is always self-defeating. Schwab MoneyWise’s It’s Your Life game has a noble mission: to convince people to save more money for retirement and other long-term objectives. At each step in Schwab’s It’s Your Life game, the choice that will lead to a winning outcome is pretty obvious. 2. 3. 4. 5.

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Mobile Considerations in User Experience Design: “Web or Native?” Advertisement Our brand new Smashing Books #3 and #3⅓1 have been released last month and we’re sincerely grateful for the tremendous feedback, reviews and photos submitted by our truly smashing readers across the world. We appreciate your time and your interest, and thank you for your support and love. Today we are happy to present a yet another sample chapter from the book.

Designing Websites for Kids: Trends and Best Practices Advertisement How would you like to design a beautiful, colorful, stimulating website that is captivating, memorable and allows you to let your creative juices flow without the need to worry too much about conventional usability and best practices? In today’s Web design market, it’s rare that such a project would present itself — unless you were asked to design a website for children!

Intrinsic vs. Extrinsic rewards in Klei’s latest game: Don’t Starve Greetings! Klei Entertainment is working on a game that has been recommended to me by just about everyone who has played it, and when Jamie Cheng offered to write up a post about player rewards and the thought behind them, I thought it was a great idea. Also, I’m traveling and needed the content. I learned some interesting things reading this this post, and I’m happy to share it with you. Enjoy! More, better, faster: UX design for startups Startups don’t have capital to burn or luxurious schedules for big-design-up-front. But unless your idea is by-and-for-engineers, design isn’t something you want to skip on your way to market. For a startup, design may mean the difference between simply shipping, and taking the market by storm. But with tight budgets, and aggressive timelines, how to include design and get the best value for the investment? Eric Ries proposes a cyclical model for development in a startup: Build > Measure > Learn (repeat).

Designing Web Registration Processes for Kids Since the term “kids” is so broad and subject to interpretation, and since kids grow so significantly in cognitive/technical ability in short periods of time, this article focuses specifically on kids ages six through eight. Designing websites for kids is a fascinating, challenging, rewarding, and exasperating experience: You’re trying to create a digital experience for people who lack the cognitive capacity to understand abstraction. You’re trying to establish brand loyalty with people who are influenced almost exclusively by their peers. And you’re trying to communicate subjective value propositions to people who can only see things in black-and-white. Add to this the need to collect data from people with a deep-seated fear of sharing personal information, and you’ve got your work cut out for you. Let’s remember, too, that these people are still learning how to read, and haven’t taken Typing 101 yet.

Games, Gamification, and the Quest for Learner Engagement Game-based learning can turn disconnected, bored learners into engaged participants. Juan sits in front of his laptop while slowly, painfully progressing through a customer service e-learning course. He is bored and disinterested. Juan wants desperately to click the "next" button in quick succession and rush through to the end. Then he can take the simplistic 10-question multiple-choice test, pass the course, and get back to work. Colors and the UI As the name suggests, GUIs (Graphical User Interfaces) present their features and functions visually. The human-computer interaction is heavily based on seeing things, looking for things and interacting with graphical UI elements. Color is a main characteristic of any visual scene, not only on computer screens, but in any situation where we see something. Because most of what we see and interact with in our everyday life is colored (as opposed to shades of white-gray-black), we are very familiar with colors – maybe so much that we don’t think about them a lot. On the other hand, it does bother us when we need to read a dark-gray label on a black button.

Web Design Showcases From Various Industries - Smashing Magazine This overview features a hand-picked and organized selection of the most useful and popular Smashing Magazine’s articles related to Web Design Showcases and published here over all the years. Can User Experience Be Beautiful? An Analysis Of Navigation In Portfolio Websites When users land on your website, they typically read the content available.

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