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Leaflet - a modern, lightweight JavaScript library for interactive maps by CloudMade

Leaflet - a modern, lightweight JavaScript library for interactive maps by CloudMade
An Open-Source JavaScript Library for Mobile-Friendly Interactive Maps November 18, 2013 — Leaflet 0.7 Release, MapBox & Plans for Future (Blog Post) Leaflet is a modern open-source JavaScript library for mobile-friendly interactive maps. It is developed by Vladimir Agafonkin with a team of dedicated contributors. Weighing just about 33 KB of JS, it has all the features most developers ever need for online maps. Leaflet is designed with simplicity, performance and usability in mind.

http://leafletjs.com/index.html

The internet is our social network. What if social networks were more like email? What if they were all inter-connected, and you could choose which software (and even which provider) to use based purely on what they offered you? Now they are! Friendica is bringing them all together. All of these can be included in your Friendica "social stream" where you may interact with them using a familiar conversational interface - and perhaps arrange them into private conversation groups. This lets you easily separate what posts can be seen by your co-workers and your beer-drinking buddies.

LookAt - Video Collaboration Share your projects with everyone involved. Easily sketch changes and add, share and respond to comments frame-by-frame. Never confuse versions again! The latest version of your video and all previous revisions are clearly organized and easily accessible in the LookAt environment. Geographic JSON (geojson) - Note: The data for concluded WGs is occasionally incorrect. Charter for Working Group GeoJSON is a format for encoding data about geographic features using JavaScript Object Notation (JSON) [RFC7159]. Geographic features need not be physical things; any thing with properties that are bounded in space may be considered a feature.

Font sizing with rem Determining a unit of measurement to size our text can be a topic of heated debate, even in this day and age. Unfortunately, there are still various pros and cons that make the various techniques less desirable. It's just a matter of which less-desirable is most desirable. There are two main techniques that are extolled: Size with pxSize with em OpenStreetMap Where is this? Reverse Directions Welcome to OpenStreetMap! OpenStreetMap is a map of the world, created by people like you and free to use under an open license. List of OSM-based services Available languages — Alphabetically sorted complete list of projects using especially data from OpenStreetMap. For any page using just the OSM Map see OSM Internet Links. For smaller user favourites lists see:

holmes.css - CSS Markup Detective What does it do? The holmes.css file will display either an error (red outline), a warning (yellow outline), or a deprecated style (dark grey outline) for flags such as: Missing required attributes on tags, such as name attributes on inputs (lots of these) Potentially improvable markup, such as links with href="#" Deprecated and Non-W3C Elements - see W3C.org's article on obselete tags Non-W3C Attributes - as above, just the most important ones since there are MANY Thanks to Anthony Mann, holmes now displays an informative error message when you hover over the element. Support for :after/::after on images is non-existent however in most browsers.

F4map Demo - Interactive 3D map Discover our solutions Rue halévy vers Rue Gluck 49 km/h 15h10 5min 29s CSS Selectors and Pseudo Selectors and browser support This page has not been updated for some time and some of the browser versions are obsolete - I'm working on a better format for the page, so check back every now and then :) The following is a range of CSS tests of the most common browsers' support for selectors and pseudo selectors. The tests includes basic stuff from the good old days of CSS1 and funky stuff from the future (CSS3).

F4map Demo - Interactive 3D map Discover our solutions Rue halévy vers Rue Gluck 49 km/h 15h10 Heroku Breaks Through with Facebook Cloud Integration Following hot on the heels of its recent announcement that it would add support for Java to the support already given to apps written in Ruby, Node.js and Clojure, Platform-as-a-service provider Heroku this morning announced a breakthrough partnership with Facebook that effectively allows anyone with a Heroku account to become an adept, cloud-based Facebook app developer. To give SitePoint readers a head start, we’ve obtained permission to publish the following tutorial, drawing on functionality in Facebook that is only available from today. Let me hand you over to Adam Wiggins of Heroku. Getting Started with Your Facebook App on Heroku This guide is for Facebook developers who are creating apps on Heroku via the Facebook Cloud Services integration.

Your access to this site has been limited Your access to this service has been temporarily limited. Please try again in a few minutes. (HTTP response code 503) ZUI Site Riot Tutorial info Knowledge needed: CSS, Intermediate JavaScript Requires: text editor, browser that supports CSS3 transforms Project time: 4 hours With CSS3 transforms now supported in most major browsers, we have the delightful opportunity to experiment creating innovative layouts and interfaces.

Expanding Text Areas Made Elegant An expanding text area is a multi-line text input field that expands in height to fit its contents. This UI element is commonly found in both desktop and mobile applications, such as the SMS composition field on the iPhone. Examples can also be found on the web, including on Facebook, where it’s used extensively. It’s a good choice wherever you don’t know how much text the user will write and you want to keep the layout compact; as such, it’s especially useful on interfaces targeted at smartphones. Issue № 338

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