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CHAOS

CHAOS

http://www.chaos-math.org/fr/home2

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Chaos Theory: A Brief Introduction What exactly is chaos? The name "chaos theory" comes from the fact that the systems that the theory describes are apparently disordered, but chaos theory is really about finding the underlying order in apparently random data. When was chaos first discovered? The first true experimenter in chaos was a meteorologist, named Edward Lorenz. In 1960, he was working on the problem of weather prediction.

Welcome to Space Math @ NASA ! On July 5, 2016 the Juno spacecraft entered orbit around the giant planet Jupiter. Here are a few resources that feature this historic event! More will follow as its exciting science data is released Math Encounters – The Museum of Mathematics Math Encounters Next presentation: “Peeling the World” Oct 1 at 4:00 PM by David Swart “Peeling the World” Oct 1 at 6:30 PM by David Swart The world is filled with spherical imagery: patterns on soccer balls, panoramic photos, and even the globe itself. 40 maps that explain the world Maps can be a remarkably powerful tool for understanding the world and how it works, but they show only what you ask them to. So when we saw a post sweeping the Web titled "40 maps they didn't teach you in school," one of which happens to be a WorldViews original, I thought we might be able to contribute our own collection. Some of these are pretty nerdy, but I think they're no less fascinating and easily understandable.

Fill in the Blanks: Using Math to Turn Lo-Res Datasets Into Hi-Res Samples Using a mathematical concept called sparsity, the compressed-sensing algorithm takes lo-res files and transforms them into sharp images. Illustration: Gabriel Peyre In the early spring of 2009, a team of doctors at the Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital at Stanford University lifted a 2-year-old into an MRI scanner. The boy, whom I’ll call Bryce, looked tiny and forlorn inside the cavernous metal device. Complex systems Complex systems present problems both in mathematical modelling and philosophical foundations. The study of complex systems represents a new approach to science that investigates how relationships between parts give rise to the collective behaviors of a system and how the system interacts and forms relationships with its environment.[1] Such systems are used to model processes in computer science, biology,[2] economics, physics, chemistry,[3] and many other fields.

Get Started Three Steps to Get Started OLI’s aim is to combine free, high-quality courses, continuous feedback, and research to improve learning and transform higher education. If you’re ready to check out OLI for yourself, get started in three easy steps. STEP 1Request an Instructor Account You will need to sign up for an instructor account. Once you fill out the form, we will confirm your account via email within two business days.

The Beauty of Mathematics: A Visual Demonstration of Math in Everyday Life This lovely video short from Yann Pineill and Nicolas Lefaucheux of Paris video production agency Parachutes succinctly demonstrates the underlying mathematics behind everyday occurrences in the format of a triptych. On the left we see the mathematical equation, in the middle a mathematical model, and on the right a video of such things as snowflakes, wind, sound, trees and magnetism. The video begins with the following quote: A Famous Steve Jobs Speech Is Hidden on Your Mac Every Mac which has the Pages app for OS X installed includes a little Easter Egg that few know about; a famous Steve Jobs speech, tucked away in a little unassuming folder. Technically, it’s two different Steve Jobs speeches, the famous text from the Crazy Ones Think Different campaign, and arguably the even more famous 2005 Steve Jobs commencement speech from Stanford University. Note that you must have Pages.app installed in OS X to find the Easter Egg file, Pages is free as part of the iWork suite nowadays on new Macs, and older versions can upgrade to the latest versions for free. The file exists in the newest version of Pages and presumably older versions as well. Selecting the file and hitting spacebar will show the full Easter Egg in Quick Look: There may be a way to access the speech somewhere from the Pages app without launching it directly or accessing it through the apps Resources folder, if you know of one let us know in the comments.

Games to entertain a commutative mathematician. I get the Tyne & Wear Metro in and out of work every day. When I don’t have a quality periodical to peruse, I like to play games on my phone. I’ve found a few really good games for my phone that also exercise my maths muscle recently, so I thought I’d write a post about them to share the fun, and prompt you to recommend even more. Entropy law linked to intelligence, say researchers 23 April 2013Last updated at 06:08 ET By Jason Palmer Science and technology reporter, BBC News The tyranny of entropy abounds in everyday examples of disorder - and a tendency toward mess A modification to one of the most fundamental laws of physics may provide a link to the rise of intelligence, cooperation - even upright walking. The idea of entropy describes the way in which the Universe heads inexorably toward a higher state of disorder. A mathematical model in Physical Review Letters proposes that systems maximise entropy in the present and the future.

Partition Function P , sometimes also denoted (Abramowitz and Stegun 1972, p. 825; Comtet 1974, p. 94; Hardy and Wright 1979, p. 273; Conway and Guy 1996, p. 94; Andrews 1998, p. 1), gives the number of ways of writing the integer as a sum of positive integers, where the order of addends is not considered significant. By convention, partitions are usually ordered from largest to smallest (Skiena 1990, p. 51). For example, since 4 can be written TeX TeX (/ˈtɛx/ or /ˈtɛk/, see below) is a typesetting system designed and mostly written by Donald Knuth[1] and released in 1978. Together with the Metafont language for font description and the Computer Modern family of typefaces, TeX was designed with two main goals in mind: to allow anybody to produce high-quality books using a reasonably minimal amount of effort, and to provide a system that would give exactly the same results on all computers, at any point in time.[2] TeX is a popular means by which to typeset complex mathematical formulae; it has been noted as one of the most sophisticated digital typographical systems in the world.[3] TeX is popular in academia, especially in mathematics, computer science, economics, engineering, physics, statistics, and quantitative psychology. It has largely displaced Unix troff, the other favored formatter, in many Unix installations, which use both for different purposes. The widely used MIME type for TeX is application/x-tex.

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