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Swoogle Semantic Web Search Engine

Swoogle Semantic Web Search Engine

http://swoogle.umbc.edu/

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eDonkey network The eDonkey Network (also known as the eDonkey2000 network or eD2k) is a decentralized, mostly server-based, peer-to-peer file sharing network best suited to share big files among users, and to provide long term availability of files. Like most sharing networks, it is decentralized, as there is not any central hub for the network; also, files are not stored on a central server but are exchanged directly between users based on the peer-to-peer principle. Currently, the eD2k network is not supported by any organization (in the past it was supported by the MetaMachine Corporation, its creator, which now is out of business) and development and maintenance is being fully provided by its community and client developers.

100 Exquisite Adjectives By Mark Nichol Adjectives — descriptive words that modify nouns — often come under fire for their cluttering quality, but often it’s quality, not quantity, that is the issue. Plenty of tired adjectives are available to spoil a good sentence, but when you find just the right word for the job, enrichment ensues. Practice precision when you select words. Watson Semantic Web Search This is the Watson Web interface for searching ontologies and semantic documents using keywords. This interface is subject to frequent evolutions and improvements. If you want to share your opinion, suggest improvement or comment on the results, don't hesitate to contact us...

Onswipe Imagine waiting for the train while picking out your groceries from a display case filled with products identical in size, scale and color to really grocery store shelves. If the first round of the digital revolution was about making the real virtual, this time it is about making the virtual real again. South Korean grocery chain Tesco was looking for a way to one-up their major competitor – impossible to do in terms of physical shops due to a lack of actual stores; hence, they turned toward the world wide web with a combination of mobile phone and QR code technologies. Using smartphones, shoppers can browse the isles during time normally spent idle anyway on their way to or from work. Their purchased products are then delivered by the store, waiting for them when they get home and ready to be put right into the kitchen cabinets, refrigerator or freezer.

Borrowed words in English: tracing the changing patterns In Borrowed Words: A History of Loanwords in English I examine how words borrowed from different languages have influenced English throughout its history. The above feature summarizes some of the main data from the book, focussing on the fourteen sources that have given the most words to English, as reflected by the new and revised entries in the Oxford English Dictionary. Using the date buttons at the top of the graphic, you can compare the impact that different languages have made on English over time. In the “per period” view, you can see the proportions of words coming into English from each source in 50-year slices from 1150 up to the present day. Compare for instance how the input from German has grown and then declined again from 1800 to the present day. (The earliest period, pre-1150, is much longer than 50 years, because more precise dating of words from this early stage in the history of English is very problematic.)

Social Media App Lets You Live Vicariously Through Friends' Experiences Vycarious, a new social-media app that is available for iOS, lets you create, follow and comment on friends' experiences, ranging from a two-week vacation to handcrafting a dinner table. To start, users create an "experience description," such as "cooking Pad Thai." They then choose a photo or video as the lead image, denote a starting date and time, and include hashtags to make their experience searchable. After that, users can upload posts, videos, images and other media until their experience ends. However, friends can still write comments even after users hit the end button to signal that their experience is over. "There just really isn't a way to share an entire experience [on social media]," Rosalie Bartlett, co-founder and CEO of Vycarious, told Mashable. " With Twitter, it's tiny, tiny snippets.

Recommended Gateway Sites for the Deep Web Recommended Gateway Sites for the Deep Web And Specialized and Limited-Area Search Engines This portion of the Internet consists of information that requires interaction to display such as dynamically-created pages, real-time information and databases.

The 101 Most Useful Websites on the Internet Here are the most useful websites on the Internet that will make you smarter, increase productivity and help you learn new skills. These incredibly useful websites solve at least one problem really well. And they all have cool URLs that are easy to memorize thus saving you a trip to Google. Dictionnaire Infernal The Dictionnaire Infernal (English: Infernal Dictionary) is a book on demonology, organised in hellish hierarchies. It was written by Jacques Auguste Simon Collin de Plancy and first published in 1818. There were several editions of the book; perhaps the most famous is the 1863 edition, which included sixty-nine illustrations by Louis Le Breton depicting the appearances of several of the demons.

Trans-Atlantic Bandwidth Crunch coming During the dot-com boom, so many undersea cable delivering the Internet traversed the bottom of the ocean between the U.S. and Europe that bandwidth prices plummeted and providers of submarine cables filed for bankruptcy. But those cables may soon no longer be enough to satisfy the global demand for bandwidth between the two continents, according to research out today from TeleGeography. The research firm estimates that bandwidth requirements will grow 33 percent between 2008 and 2015, and trans-Atlantic capacity will be exhausted by 2014.

Nomophobia Nomophobia is the fear of being out of mobile phone contact.[1][2][3] The term, an abbreviation for "no-mobile-phone phobia",[4] was coined during a 2010 study by the UK Post Office who commissioned YouGov, a UK-based research organization to look at anxieties suffered by mobile phone users. The study found that nearly 53% of mobile phone users in Britain tend to be anxious when they "lose their mobile phone, run out of battery or credit, or have no network coverage". The study found that about 58% of men and 47% of women suffer from the phobia, and an additional 9% feel stressed when their mobile phones are off. The study sampled 2,163 people. More than one in two nomophobes never switch off their mobile phones.[8] The study and subsequent coverage of the phobia resulted in two editorial columns authored by those who minimize their mobile phone use or choose not to own one at all, treating the condition with light undertones of or outright disbelief and amusement.[9][10] See also[edit]

Moteur de recherche d'ontologies by lully Nov 2

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