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DBpedia is a crowd-sourced community effort to extract structured information from Wikipedia and make this information available on the Web. DBpedia allows you to ask sophisticated queries against Wikipedia, and to link the different data sets on the Web to Wikipedia data. We hope that this work will make it easier for the huge amount of information in Wikipedia to be used in some new interesting ways. Furthermore, it might inspire new mechanisms for navigating, linking, and improving the encyclopedia itself. Upcoming Events News Call for Ideas and Mentors for GSoC 2014 DBpedia + Spotlight joint proposal (please contribute within the next days)We started to draft a document for submission at Google Summer of Code 2014: are still in need of ideas and mentors. The DBpedia Knowledge Base Knowledge bases are playing an increasingly important role in enhancing the intelligence of Web and enterprise search and in supporting information integration. Within the Related:  GaphiSemantic Web

Querying DBpedia DBpedia, as its home page tells us, "is a community effort to extract structured information from Wikipedia and to make this information available on the Web." That's "available" in the sense of available as data to programs that read and process it, because the data was already available to eyeballs on Wikipedia. This availability is a big deal to the semantic web community because it's a huge amount of valuable (and often, fun) information that the public can now query with SPARQL, the W3C standard query language that is one of the pillars of the semantic web. Although I'd dabbled in SPARQL and seen several sample SPARQL queries against DBpedia in action, I had a little trouble working out how to create my own SPARQL queries against DBpedia data. I finally managed to do it, so I thought I'd describe here how I successfully implemented my first use case. Once I knew the following three things, I could create the SPARQL query: Of course this is just scratching the surface.

SweoIG/TaskForces/CommunityProjects/LinkingOpenData - W3C Wiki News 2014-12-03: The 8th edition of the Linked Data on the Web workshop will take place at WWW2015 in Florence, Italy. The paper submission deadline for the workshop is 15 March, 2015. 2014-09-10: An updated version of the LOD Cloud diagram has been published. The new version contains 570 linked datasets which are connected by 2909 linksets. Project Description The Open Data Movement aims at making data freely available to everyone. The goal of the W3C SWEO Linking Open Data community project is to extend the Web with a data commons by publishing various open data sets as RDF on the Web and by setting RDF links between data items from different data sources. RDF links enable you to navigate from a data item within one data source to related data items within other sources using a Semantic Web browser. The figures below show the data sets that have been published and interlinked by the project so far. Clickable version of this diagram. Project Pages Meetings & Gatherings See Also Demos 1. 2.

A New Best Friend: Gephi for Large-scale Networks Though I never intended it, some posts of mine from a few years back dealing with 26 tools for large-scale graph visualization have been some of the most popular on this site. Indeed, my recommendation for Cytoscape for viewing large-scale graphs ranks within the top 5 posts all time on this site. When that analysis was done in January 2008 my company was in the midst of needing to process the large UMBEL vocabulary, which now consists of 28,000 concepts. Like anything else, need drives research and demand, and after reviewing many graphing programs, we chose Cytoscape, then provided some ongoing guidelines in its use for semantic Web purposes. We have continued to use it productively in the intervening years. Like for any tool, one reviews and picks the best at the time of need. The Cytoscape Baseline and Limitations Three and one-half years ago when I first wrote about Cytoscape, it was at version 2.5. Choosing Gephi and Using It Outputs Speak for Themselves Some Further Gephi Links

Tools This page gives an overview of software tools related to the Semantic Web or to semantic technologies in general. Due to the large amount of tools being created in the community, this site is always somewhat outdated. Contributions and updates are welcomed. See also: Tool Chains Adding your own Adding your own tool is as easy as creating a page. Do not forget to use a suitable category to classify the tool, otherwise it will not appear below. If your tool is an OWL 2 implementation or a RIF implementation not yet listed here, please consider to add it. Current tools on semanticweb.org.edu The following tools are currently recorded in this wiki. RDF2Go (Version 4.8.3, 4 June 2013) Bigdata (Version 1.2.3, 31 May 2013) Semantic Measures Library (Version 0.0.5, 4 April 2013) HermiT (Version 1.3.7, 25 March 2013) Fluent Editor (Version 2.2.2, 20 March 2013) The following is a list of all tools currently known (use the icons in the table header to sort by any particular column)

Graphing the history of philosophy « Drunks&Lampposts A close up of ancient and medieval philosophy ending at Descartes and Leibniz If you are interested in this data set you might like my latest post where I use it to make book recommendations. This one came about because I was searching for a data set on horror films (don’t ask) and ended up with one describing the links between philosophers. To cut a long story very short I’ve extracted the information in the influenced by section for every philosopher on Wikipedia and used it to construct a network which I’ve then visualised using gephi It’s an easy process to repeat. First I’ll show why I think it’s worked as a visualisation. Each philosopher is a node in the network and the lines between them (or edges in the terminology of graph theory) represents lines of influence. It gets more interesting when we use Gephi to identify communities (or modules) within the network. It has been fairly successful. The Continental Tradition The graph is probably most insightful when you zoom in close.

SemanticWebTools - W3C Wiki REDIRECT New SemanticWiki Tools Page As of 12:50, 14 January 2010, this page is no longer maintained and should not be changed. The content has been transferred to (Changes made here after the above date may not be reflected on the new page!) Please consult and possibly modify that page. Table of Contents: This page contains the information on RDF and OWL tools that used to be listed on the home pages of the RDF and OWL Working Groups at W3C. This Wiki page is only for programming and development tools. There are other pages on tool collection, largely overlapping with this, but possibly with a different granularity or emphasis. There are also separate pages maintained on this Wiki for: SPARQL implementations, set up by the SPARQL Working Group (although most of the information is present on this page, too) SPARQL "endpoints", examples of using SPARQL in exposing various data. Adobe's XMP Altova's SemanticWorks Amilcare Arity's LexiLink Asio Cerebra Server Rej

SemanticWebImport - Gephi:Wiki Licensing This plugin is developped inside Inria, by the Wimmics research team, with the support of the Dream team. This plugin is made available through the CeCILL-B licence. Videos The main page for the following videos can found at SemanticWebImport Plugin Videos. Description The SemanticWebImport plugin is intended to allow the import of semantic data into Gephi. by accessing local rdf, rdfs, rul files and using the embedded Corese engine to apply the SPARQL request; by accessing a remote REST SPARQL endpoint. We begin by showing how to make run the preset examples which come with the plugin. In all the following cases, it is required there is a currently opened project, otherwise the graph can not be built. General Description of the GUI The plugin consist of fourth tabs: How to access the data First tab of the plugin This tab allows to select among the available SPARQL drivers how the semantic data can be accessed. Write the SPARQL query Second tab of the plugin Execution log Launch the query

Tools - Visual Data Web More information on the DBpedia endpoint availability. Several tools have already been developed in the project that showcase the visual power of the Data Web. The following four tools are all implemented in the open source framework Adobe Flex. They are readily configured to access RDF data of the DBpedia and/or Linking Open Data (LOD) projects and only require a Flash Player to be executed (which is usually already installed in Web browsers). Just try out the live demos or watch the screencasts first. If you want to know more about the tools, check out the separate tool pages or get in contact with the developers. Since most DBpedia data has been automatically extracted from Wikipedia and other sources, it cannot be expected to be 100% complete or correct. All tools on this website are research prototypes that might contain errors.

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