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Thinkmap SDK The Thinkmap SDK enables organizations to incorporate data-driven visualization technology into their enterprise Web applications. Thinkmap applications allow users to make sense of complex information in ways that traditional interfaces are incapable of. The Thinkmap SDK (v. 2.8) includes a set of out-of-the-box configurations for solving common visualization problems, as well as new visualization techniques for customizing data displays. We have designed Thinkmap to be lightweight, fast, easily extensible, and able to connect seamlessly to a wide variety of data sources. an extremely lightweight and fast browser-based Visualization Component that renders the visualizations and allows for interactive exploration a Data Source API that enables connection to many different types of data sources Thinkmap's flexible architecture allows developers to configure applications to address a wide range of retrieval and discovery issues.

untitled Part I. Getting Started Chapter 1. 1.1. rdf:about Sesame 2 ΒΆ 1.1.1. Sesame is an open source Java framework for storage and querying of RDF data. Of course, a framework isn't very useful without implementations of the various APIs. Originally, Sesame was developed by Aduna (then known as Aidministrator) as a research prototype for the hugely successful EU research project On-To-Knowledge. Sesame is currently developed as a community project, with Aduna as the project leader. 1.1.2. This user manual covers most aspects of working with Sesame in a variety of settings. The basics of programming with Sesame are covered in chapter-repository-api. chapter-http-protocol gives an overview of the structure of the HTTP REST protocol for the Sesame Server, which is useful if you want to communicate with a Sesame Server from a programming language other than Java. Chapter 2. 2.1. Sesame releases can be downloaded from Sourceforge. openrdf-sesame-(version)-sdk.tar.gz. 2.1.1. 2.1.2. 2.2. 2.3. 2.3.1.

OWLIM-Lite Fact Sheet - OWLIM42 - Ontotext Wiki OWLIM-Lite is a high-performance semantic repository created by Ontotext including a native RDF rule entailment engine. It is implemented in Java and packaged as a Storage and Inference Layer (SAIL) for the Sesame openRDF framework. The supported semantics can be configured through rule-set definition and selection. Rule-sets for OWL-Horst [21], unconstrained RDFS [7] with OWL Lite [10] and the OWL2 RL profile [25][26] are included. The key features of the current release of OWLIM-Lite can be summarised as follows: The fastest semantic repository in the World, it can perform non-trivial inference on millions of RDF data statements; Pure Java implementation, ensuring ease of deployment and portability; Compatible with Sesame 2, which brings interoperability benefits and support for all major RDF syntaxes and query languages; Customisable reasoning, in addition to RDFS, OWL Horst, and OWL 2 RL support. OWLIM-Lite is a Java library without user interface.

Linked Data | Linked Data - Connect Distributed Data across the Web Mereology Mereology has been axiomatized in various ways as applications of predicate logic to formal ontology, of which mereology is an important part. A common element of such axiomatizations is the assumption, shared with inclusion, that the part-whole relation orders its universe, meaning that everything is a part of itself (reflexivity), that a part of a part of a whole is itself a part of that whole (transitivity), and that two distinct entities cannot each be a part of the other (antisymmetry). A variant of this axiomatization denies that anything is ever part of itself (irreflexive) while accepting transitivity, from which antisymmetry follows automatically. Standard university texts on logic and mathematics are silent about mereology, which has undoubtedly contributed to its obscurity. History[edit] A.N. In 1930, Henry Leonard completed a Harvard Ph.D. dissertation in philosophy, setting out a formal theory of the part-whole relation. Axioms and primitive notions[edit] The axioms are:

Virtuoso Open-Source Edition What's New 2014-02-17: New VOS 7.1.0 Released Virtuoso 7.1.0 includes improvements in the Engine (SQL Relational Tables and RDF Property/Predicate Graphs); Geo-Spatial support; SPARQL compiler; Jena and Sesame provider performance; JDBC Driver; Conductor CA root certificate management; WebDAV; and the Faceted Browser. Learn more about VOS 7.1.0... or download it now! 2013-12-10: New VOS 6.1.8 Released Virtuoso 6.1.8 includes improvements in the engine; SPARQL compiler optimisations; improvements in client RPC layer; performance improvements in Jena and Sesame providers; new Conductor WebDAV user interface; improved navigation controls for the Faceted Browser. Learn more about VOS 6.1.8... or download it now! 2013-08-05: New VOS 7.0.0 Released Virtuoso 7.0.0 is the stable release of the open source edition of the new Virtuoso engine. Learn more about VOS 7.0.0... or download it now! 2013-07-23: New VOS 6.1.7 Released Learn more about VOS 6.1.7... or download it now! Previous announcements Plugins

Open Archives Initiative - Protocol for Metadata Harvesting - v.2.0 Editors The OAI Executive:Carl Lagoze <lagoze@cs.cornell.edu > -- Cornell University - Computer Science Herbert Van de Sompel <herbertv@lanl.gov > -- Los Alamos National Laboratory - Research Library From the OAI Technical Committee:Michael Nelson <m.l.nelson@larc.nasa.gov > -- NASA - Langley Research Center Simeon Warner <simeon@cs.cornell.edu > -- Cornell University - Computer Science Table of Contents 1. Introduction2. The Open Archives Initiative Protocol for Metadata Harvesting (referred to as the OAI-PMH in the remainder of this document) provides an application-independent interoperability framework based on metadata harvesting. Data Providers administer systems that support the OAI-PMH as a means of exposing metadata; and Service Providers use metadata harvested via the OAI-PMH as a basis for building value-added services. This document refers in several places to "community-specific" practices to which individual protocol implementations may conform. 2.1 Harvester 2.2 Repository None

Semantic network Typical standardized semantic networks are expressed as semantic triples. History[edit] Example of a semantic network "Semantic Nets" were first invented for computers by Richard H. Richens of the Cambridge Language Research Unit in 1956 as an "interlingua" for machine translation of natural languages.[2] They were independently developed by Robert F. In the late 1980s, two Netherlands universities, Groningen and Twente, jointly began a project called Knowledge Graphs, which are semantic networks but with the added constraint that edges are restricted to be from a limited set of possible relations, to facilitate algebras on the graph.[12] In the subsequent decades, the distinction between semantic networks and knowledge graphs was blurred.[13][14] In 2012, Google gave their knowledge graph the name Knowledge Graph. Basics of semantic networks[edit] A semantic network is used when one has knowledge that is best understood as a set of concepts that are related to one another. Examples[edit]

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