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WordNet

WordNet
WordNet is supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant Number 0855157. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the creators of WordNet and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation. About WordNet WordNet® is a large lexical database of English. Nouns, verbs, adjectives and adverbs are grouped into sets of cognitive synonyms (synsets), each expressing a distinct concept. Synsets are interlinked by means of conceptual-semantic and lexical relations.

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The Connectome — Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences Lead investigators Hanspeter Pfister (SEAS ), Jeff Lichtman (FAS/Molecular & Cellular Biology, Center for Brain Science) and Clay Reid (HMS/Neurobiology, Center for Brain Science) Description Your personal homepage Nowadays, we are all content creators. Whether it's work or a school project, the next blog post, or even that next tweet, we all suffer from writer's block from time to time. Traditional advice suggests taking a break from your monitor and getting some fresh air. That's great old school advice, but it isn't a useful suggestion for anyone tied to their computer. We've pulled together some top ideas, tools and services for beating writer's block in an online environment, so you can break through that barrier without leaving your desk. Have a read below for our quick tips to help you beat writer's block online and let us know in the comments about any methods that have worked for you.

Questionnaires for Writing Character Profiles - Creative Writing Help Enter your e-mail to get the e-book for FREE. We'll also keep you informed about interesting website news. "I have searched the web and used different worksheets, but none have come close to your worksheets and descriptions of (what to do and what not to do). Guide to publishing a successful ebook Tweet Mashup image by Mike Licht on Flickr … and Renoir. And 7 services that let you earn income for your works Target audience: Authors, journalists, researchers, nonprofits, cause organizations, NGOs, educators, Web publishers.

Current Protocols in Bioinformatics : Wiley InterScience Online Subscriptions are now available! Visit the How to Order page for more information. What's New in Current Protocols in Bioinformatics Supplement 45, March 2014 Unit 8.8 Using VisANT to Analyze Networks Abstract | Full Text: HTML PDF Unit 15.5 Using SomaticSniper to Detect Somatic Single Nucleotide Variants Abstract | Full Text: HTML PDF Unit 15.6 BreakDancer: Identification of Genomic Structural Variation from Paired-End Read Mapping Abstract | Full Text: HTML PDF

Engineering Anomalies Research The Princeton Engineering Anomalies Research (PEAR) program, which flourished for nearly three decades under the aegis of Princeton University’s School of Engineering and Applied Science, has completed its experimental agenda of studying the interaction of human consciousness with sensitive physical devices, systems, and processes, and developing complementary theoretical models to enable better understanding of the role of consciousness in the establishment of physical reality. PEAR has now incorporated its present and future operations into the broader venue of the ICRL, a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit research organization, in addition to Psyleron—a company that provides Random Event Generator devices to enable the continued exploration of PEAR’s findings by the general public and research communities. On the accompanying menu of pages we have attempted to sketch the substance, spirit, and findings of this scholarly endeavor.

17 Crazy Places to Get Jaw Dropping Headline Ideas Headlines are bloody important. The best blog authors write irresistible headline and titles. Magazines with millions of subscribers fill every issue with juicy headlines. Top Gun copywriters spend hours brainstorming hundreds of headlines BEFORE they write. My buddha at Copyblogger says… “On average, 8 out of 10 people will read headline copy, but only 2 out of 10 will read the rest.

Transmission Model of Communication Introduction Here I will outline and critique a particular, very well-known model of communication developed by Shannon and Weaver (1949), as the prototypical example of a transmissive model of communication: a model which reduces communication to a process of 'transmitting information'. The underlying metaphor of communication as transmission underlies 'commonsense' everyday usage but is in many ways misleading and repays critical attention. Shannon and Weaver's model is one which is, in John Fiske's words, 'widely accepted as one of the main seeds out of which Communication Studies has grown' (Fiske 1982: 6).

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