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Serious Games Initiative

Serious Games Initiative
The Serious Games Initiative is focused on uses for games in exploring management and leadership challenges facing the public sector. Part of its overall charter is to help forge productive links between the electronic game industry and projects involving the use of games in education, training, health, and public policy. The Serious Games Initiative was founded at the Woodrow Wilson Center for International Scholars in Washington, D.C. Our Goals The goal of the initiative is to help usher in a new series of policy education, exploration, and management tools utilizing state of the art computer game designs, technologies, and development skills. As part of that goal the Serious Games Initiative also plays a greater role in helping to organize and accelerate the adoption of computer games for a variety of challenges facing the world today.

http://www.seriousgames.org/

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Game based learning & Gamification Lots people want to get started with game based learning, gamification and serious games in their training. We’ve been curating game related content for over a year and a half while conducting our own research and case studies. Here are 100 articles related to games and learning. Some of them are research-based, while others just offer an interesting perspective to spark discussion. Take what you need and share this with a colleague. “Teachers as Makers” – O’Reilly Radar « el/ed/tech "Making" can lead to informative writing... Teachers as Makers - O'Reilly Radar "When I began talking with folks from the National Writing Project last year, we hit on the idea that getting teachers to see themselves as makers was a great way to encourage making in schools. Thus, the goal of this workshop was to provide a gentle introduction to making for about 50 teachers.

Rethinking the ESP Game Rethinking the ESP Game Stephen Robertson, Milan Vojnović, and Ingmar Weber September 2009 The ESP Game (Ahn and Dabbish 2004) was designed to harvest human intelligence to assign labels to images - a task which is still difficult for even the most advanced systems in image processing. However, the ESP Game as it is currently implemented encourages players to assign "obvious" labels, which are most likely to lead to an agreement with the partner. But these labels can often be deduced from the labels already present using an appropriate language model and such labels therefore add only little information to the system. XEODesign Our Story XEODesign (pronounced zee-oh-design) is an award-winning firm that helps organizations increase engagement with play. We identify ways to increase engagement by eliminating factors that prevent play, and we uncover new opportunities for creating experiences based on what players like the most about games. We envision new game-inspired products and services, and we design the player behaviors, game mechanics, and emotions that make them work best.

The nine golden rules of using games in the language classroom I think you might want to download these activities so you can use them later… so here’s a handy PDF file of this blog post! I’ve long been an admirer of the use of games in teaching. Indeed, one of my most popular posts ever here on the Teach them English blog is the rather misleadingly titled ‘Why I don’t use games in the language classroom’ which, if you’ve got a spare ten minutes, gives you as good a background into the role of games in the language classroom as you’ll ever need (no need for me to be modest!). Games remain a fundamental part of my teaching as they can be used to liven up lessons, while also creating a relaxed learning atmosphere where learners feel confident to practice new language skills. The importance of games cannot be understated in the role they play in providing alternative ways of learning or showing that you can recall what has been learned. 1.

Learning styles: Worth our time? » Making Change Thanks, everyone, for continuing the discussion. I’m not sure what Jennifer means by saying that I employ “learning theories” in my design. I don’t subscribe to any particular theory. What I do is learn what I can about the audience and what they need to do in the real world. Human-based computation Human-based computation (HBC) is a computer science technique in which a machine performs its function by outsourcing certain steps to humans. This approach uses differences in abilities and alternative costs between humans and computer agents to achieve symbiotic human-computer interaction. In traditional computation, a human employs a computer[1] to solve a problem; a human provides a formalized problem description and an algorithm to a computer, and receives a solution to interpret. Human-based computation frequently reverses the roles; the computer asks a person or a large group of people to solve a problem, then collects, interprets, and integrates their solutions. Early work[edit]

Topic: Serious Games Epic releases Unreal Engine 4.1, including PlayStation 4, Xbox One support by Christian Nutt [04.24.14] Subscribers can now download the new version from GitHub, including both the stable build and "bleeding edge," untested new code. Programming, Console/PC, Serious, Indie, Social/Online, Smartphone/Tablet Blog: Crunch is good for you by Gamasutra Community [04.25.14] "'Crunch' has become a dirty word... Badges What is a Badge? badge [baj]: a special or distinctive mark, token, or device worn as a sign of allegiance, membership, authority, achievement, etc. (Source: Dictionary.com) Game-Based Learning Units for the Everyday Teacher Game-based learning (GBL) is getting a lot press. It is an innovative practice that is working to engage kids in learning important 21st century skills and content. Dr. Judy Willis in a previous post wrote about the neurological benefits and rationale around using games for learning.

Howard Gardner's Multiple Intelligences Howard Gardner theorized that there are multiple intelligences, and that we all use one or two for the most effective learning. Our culture teaches, tests, reinforces and rewards primarily two kinds of intelligence: verbal/linguistic and logical/mathematical. His theory proposes that there are at least eight other kinds of intelligence that are equally important. They are “languages” that most people speak, and that cut through cultural, educational, and ability differences. The mind is not comprised of a single representation or a single language of representations.

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