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Six Lazy Ways to Trick Your Brain Into Being Productive

Six Lazy Ways to Trick Your Brain Into Being Productive

30-Second Productivity Strategies Half a minute is all it takes to make each day more productive. 1. Take 30 seconds to set the stage for awesome success. Here's how: Before you start doing something, answer the question, "What can I do to make this awesome?" That's basically what Mike Williams of the David Allen Company (the Getting Things Done folks) asked me. At first, it sounded cheesy. Keep in mind this applies just as much to your personal life, too. Don't just move blindly on to the next task. Answer that question, and whatever you do, you will do a lot better. 2. Unfortunately, all too often you forget what happened. Don't. Then you will remember what's important--and be able to act on what's important. 3. That's a shame, because meetings involve people--and that means there's a lot to think about ahead of time. Terrible meetings are all talk and no action. 4. Feeling stressed? Need to switch from quiet mode to outgoing and engaging? Find little rituals that help prepare you for stressful or unusual situations. 5.

5 Ways to Make Your To-Do Lists More Effective To-do lists seem pretty straightforward: A list of all of the tasks you plan to accomplish during any given day or week. And, really, there are few things more satisfying than drawing lines through each entry. Progress! But, many times, they balloon to unrealistic levels, and we end up feeling overwhelmed and ineffective. That’s usually because we’re using them as a catch-all for every task that’s thrown at us. Instead, our lists should be derived from our larger goals and include tasks that move us toward those big-picture endeavors, says Robert C. 1. When you take a few minutes to write your to-do list the night before, you can hit the ground running the next morning, Pozen advises. 2. Everything that goes on your daily to-do list should fit two criteria: It should be something important that you need to do--versus that which doesn’t really need to be done or which can be delegated to someone else--and something that needs to be done on that day. 3. 4. 5.

8 Things Everybody Ought to Know About Concentrating “Music helps me concentrate,” Mike said to me glancing briefly over his shoulder. Mike was in his room writing a paper for his U.S. History class. On his desk next to his computer sat crunched Red Bulls, empty Gatorade bottles, some extra pocket change and scattered pieces of paper. In the pocket of his sweat pants rested a blaring iPod with a chord that dangled near the floor, almost touching against his Adidas sandals. On his computer sat even more stray objects than his surrounding environment. Mike made a shift about every thirty seconds between all of the above. Do you know a person like this? The Science Behind Concentration In the above account, Mike’s obviously stuck in a routine that many of us may have found ourselves in, yet in the moment we feel it’s almost an impossible routine to get out of. When we constantly multitask to get things done, we’re not multitasking, we’re rapidly shifting our attention. Phase 1: Blood Rush Alert Phase 2: Find and Execute Phase 3: Disengagement

Stanford Literature Review What is it? A critical literature review is one of the most important activities in the process of research and is usually included as part of the introduction to a research report or thesis. The aim of a literature review is to show that the writer insightfully evaluated the existing published literature on a particular topic. A good literature review should do the following: Define the scope of the problem Place the current study in a historical perspective Show the relationship between previous research and the current research thesis Avoid unnecessary duplication Evaluate different research methodologies and emphasize key studies Compare and contrast different research findings on a topic while grouping together authors with similar conclusions and noting areas in which authors are in disagreement Report gaps in the previous research and how the current study can add to the literature in general Conclude by summarizing what the literature says How does one begin? C.

List of academic databases and search engines Wikipedia list article This article contains a representative list of notable databases and search engines useful in an academic setting for finding and accessing articles in academic journals, institutional repositories, archives, or other collections of scientific and other articles. Databases and search engines differ substantially in terms of coverage and retrieval qualities.[1] Users need to account for qualities and limitations of databases and search engines, especially those searching systematically for records such as in systematic reviews or meta-analyses.[2] As the distinction between a database and a search engine is unclear for these complex document retrieval systems, see: the general list of search engines for all-purpose search engines that can be used for academic purposesthe article about bibliographic databases for information about databases giving bibliographic information about finding books and journal articles. Operating services[edit] See also[edit] References[edit]

Blended Learning Toolkit | Understanding by Design Overview Understanding by Design, an excellent book by Grant Wiggins and Jay McTighe, offers a powerful framework for designing courses through what they call “Backward Design.” It seems “backward” in that it starts from the opposite end of the planning process we typically go through to design courses—we usually start by thinking about how to teach our content. Backward Design, in contrast, leaves teaching activities until the end and starts with the desired results of that teaching. In other words, Wiggins and McTighe argue that you can’t start planning how you’re going to teach until you know exactly what you want your students to learn. “Teaching is a means to an end. The Backward Design process proceeds in three phases, as follows: I. First, you establish your learning goals for the course. What should participants hear, read, view, explore or otherwise encounter? II. III. Resources Understanding by Design is available online and in the CFT library.

Intro to Online Course Design "Design is not just what it looks like and feels like. Design is how it works." — Steve Jobs As an online instructor, you may find yourself involved in numerous roles related to online course design. Whether you are responsible for the conversion or adaptation of a traditional course for online delivery, assigned to teach courses that were previously designed and developed by others, or relied on for content expertise as a member of a design and development team, your understanding of the online course design process is crucial to the development of an effective learning environment for future students. Online course design requires a wide range of skills and tools. This article provides an overview of the field of instructional design and technology, a look at the typical process of an online course design project, guidelines for faculty subject matter experts (SME), as well as resources for further reading and research. Instructional Design & Technology Models, Theories, and Frameworks

100 Search Engines For Academic Research Back in 2010, we shared with you 100 awesome search engines and research resources in our post: 100 Time-Saving Search Engines for Serious Scholars. It’s been an incredible resource, but now, it’s time for an update. Some services have moved on, others have been created, and we’ve found some new discoveries, too. General Need to get started with a more broad search? iSEEK Education:iSeek is an excellent targeted search engine, designed especially for students, teachers, administrators, and caregivers. Meta Search Want the best of everything? Dogpile:Find the best of all the major search engines with Dogpile, an engine that returns results from Google, Yahoo! Databases and Archives Resources like the Library of Congress have considerable archives and documents available, and many of them have taken their collections online. Books & Journals WorldCat:Find items from 10,000 libraries worldwide, with books, DVDs, CDs, and articles up for grabs. Science Math & Technology Social Science History

5 Social Media Lessons I Learned from Peter Pan Disney has taught us a whole slew of lessons since we were kids. But they taught us more than to believe in ourselves, to help each other, and to wish upon stars—they planted the seeds to social media success over sixty years ago, and we’re reaping the benefits now. What am I talking about? Peter Pan. Provide a Solution to Your Audience’s Problem Mr. On social media, it’s absolutely integral to listen to what your audience is talking about, so that you can understand what they want. Lead Your Audience Where You Want Them to Go When you’re shopping in a store, and you ask a salesperson where an item is, wouldn’t you rather they walk you to the item to show you where it is instead of pointing in some direction and telling you where to go? He comes in, takes Wendy by the hand, shows them how to fly, and escorts them all the way to Neverland. Establish Yourself as a Leader to Grow Your Following In Neverland, the Lost Boys all look up to Peter Pan because he’s their leader. Connect: Lisi Powers

Why Your Job Cover Letter Sucks (and what you can do to fix it) For the next few months I will be posting the “best of the best” Professor is in blog posts on the job market, for the benefit of all those girding their loins for the 2013-2014 market. Today’s post was originally published in 2011. I’ve now read about two thousand more job letters than I mention here. All the advice still applies. In my 15 years as a faculty member I served on approximately 11 search committees. Estimating that each search brought in an average of 200 applications (a conservative estimate for a field like Anthropology, a generous estimate for a much smaller field like East Asian Languages and Literatures), that means I have read approximately 2200 job applications. That means I’ve read 2200 job cover letters. I’ve also read the cover letters of my own students, and a passel of Ph.D. students who came to me for advice, as well as a large number of clients since opening The Professor is In (as of July 2012 let’s say 600). What’s up with that? Here’s what’s up with that. 1.

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