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Project Information Literacy: Smart Talks

Project Information Literacy: Smart Talks
Howard Rheingold: "Crap Detection 101: Required Coursework" Project Information Literacy, "Smart Talks," no. 5, January 3, 2011 Subscribe our Smart Talk RSS feed Printer-friendly version Photo Credit: Judith Maas Rheingold If one word captures Howard Rheingold's writing about the political, cultural, and social impact of new technologies, that word is prescient. In 1987, Howard was one of the first to write about the peer-to-peer power of virtual communities building collective intelligence. Not only does he detect change before everyone else does, but Howard also writes about the complex interplay of technology, society, and culture with clarity, depth, candor, and profound insight. We caught up with Howard in late December and shared some of Project Information Literacy's (PIL) latest findings with him. PIL: Since 2003, you have been teaching college students at Berkeley and Stanford. Dealing with the rate of change is also an issue. Your last question is a big one. Howard: Meet Buffy J.

Ten Search Tools and Tactics Teachers and Students Need to Know I often find myself in conversations with teachers and students about Internet search strategies. Often times the conversation reminds me that what's obvious to me is amazing to someone else. Last week I had that very experience as I taught a couple of teachers some search techniques that they are going to pass along to their students. As a follow-up to that experience, I've crafted the following list of search tools and tactics that every teacher and student should know. 1. Stop Googling "What" questions. 2. 3. 4. 5. Sweet Search is a search engine that searches only the sites that have been reviewed and approved by a team of librarians, teachers, and research experts. Wolfram Alpha is billed as a computational search engine and this is exactly what it does. Twurdy is search tool that automatically displays the readability of your search results for you. Twurdy with Pop - searches using Twurdy's most complex algorithm which includes looking up the popularity of words within the text.

How to Test For One Hundred Percent Truth - the 3 Emergence Truth Tests This article was written only months before I discovered the map of the mind. And while these ideas are still true, our standards for accessing truth have since been raised a thousand fold. More important, in 2010, I began work on a new scientific method, one with which discoveries are guaranteed. This method also contains a far more stringent test for truth. This said, this article is still important in that is shows the relationships between my work on mind and consciousness, emergence personality theory, and emergence therapy. It also shows how anything posited had (and still has to) test as true from all three prospectives; from the view of the mind, from the perspective of personality, and as part of a working therapy. On What Do We Base Our Three Emergence Based Theories? The First Truth Test - the Two Geometries (the meta truth test) Socrates had four main areas of study. Logically, one cannot fault Socrates here. Truth for Socrates was a much purer goal. Why this order? Steven

The Unquiet Librarian Personal information management Personal information management (PIM) refers to the practice and the study of the activities people perform in order to acquire, organize, maintain, retrieve and use personal information items such as documents (paper-based and digital), web pages and email messages for everyday use to complete tasks (work-related or not) and fulfill a person’s various roles (as parent, employee, friend, member of community, etc.). There are six ways in which information can be personal: [1] Owned by "me"About "me"Directed toward "me"Sent/Posted by "me"Experienced by "me"Relevant to "me" One ideal of PIM is that people should always have the right information in the right place, in the right form, and of sufficient completeness and quality to meet their current need. History and background[edit] Although PIM is a relatively new field, information management began in spoken word; people would use mnemonics as PIM for the human memory. [1] Tools[edit] Study[edit] Related activities and areas[edit]

TRAILS: Tool for Real-time Assessment of Information Literacy Skills TRAILS-9 not active, content moved As of July 1, 2019, TRAILS-9 is no longer an active site. All TRAILS content is now available as an open educational resource (OER) at the new site at TRAILS-Archive.org. Resources available at TRAILS-Archive.org include: + TRAILS assessments as downloadable PDFs + A searchable database of all TRAILS items + Teaching resources contributed by users + A history of TRAILS Registered TRAILS-9 users Registered TRAILS users will be able to continue to sign in to this TRAILS-9.org site to view their existing data through June 30, 2020. Our Appreciation We are proud of the impact and reach TRAILS has had over the past fourteen years. TRAILS-9.org was a service of Kent State University Libraries.

A Learning Secret: Don’t Take Notes with a Laptop “More is better.” From the number of gigs in a cellular data plan to the horsepower in a pickup truck, this mantra is ubiquitous in American culture. When it comes to college students, the belief that more is better may underlie their widely-held view that laptops in the classroom enhance their academic performance. Laptops do in fact allow students to do more, like engage in online activities and demonstrations, collaborate more easily on papers and projects, access information from the internet, and take more notes. Indeed, because students can type significantly faster than they can write, those who use laptops in the classroom tend to take more notes than those who write out their notes by hand. Obviously it is advantageous to draft more complete notes that precisely capture the course content and allow for a verbatim review of the material at a later date. What drives this paradoxical finding? Wrong again.

Blogs of School Librarians/Educators Resource Descriptions 5 Reasons You Should Keep All Your Notes in One Place Do you ever find yourself searching for that one note that you know you wrote down somewhere? Perhaps, it is a last-minute frantic search for a piece of information that you need. Or you have been endlessly searching for days for that missing document. You need to keep your notes in one place. Where are Your Notes? A complete time management system includes many productivity tools. You need the ability to capture notes and pieces of information. A common trap is to write notes everywhere. Simply put, the more places you take notes… the more places you have to look later when you need a piece of information. A better solution is to record all of your notes in one place, one tool. Here are 5 Reasons You Should Always Keep Your Notes in One Place: Reduced Cutter – If your desk is covered in notebooks, pads, and loose pieces of paper, then you are taking notes in too many places. One Place for Your Notes Choose the solution that works best for you. No time for time management?

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