background preloader

How to become smarter by doing less in the information age

How to become smarter by doing less in the information age
Common: Believing that focusing on detail is the only and best path to success. Uncommon: Let’s be honest: Most things studied in college are quickly forgotten. I believe this is partly due to the sheer number of concepts addressed per class, per semester. In my experience, the emphasis is often on breadth versus depth. This poses a challenge to students studying for comprehensive tests. I know; I’ve been there many times. But I didn’t have the “luxury” of making the library my second home to spend hours on rote memorization. The eclipsing effect of detail: Traditional college advice places an extremely high level of importance on detail, but this train of thought can be a hindrance, at times resulting in increased stress and workload. An extreme focus on detail limits one’s ability to grasp the larger picture, which is critical to knowing what details to focus on. Even though it may seem like some tests include everything covered during the semester, 99% of tests do not. Not so. - Kent

http://www.theuncommonlife.com/blog/how-to-become-smarter-by-doing-less/

Related:  Learning StrategiesSelf Actualisationedu

The Secret To Learning New Skills Twice As Fast Learning a new skill doesn’t depend so much on how much practice you do, but how you practice. The key is to subtly vary your training with changes that keep your brain learning. By changing up your routine, new research says, you can cut the time to acquire a new skill by half. Acquiring new motor skills requires repetition, but iterative repetition is much more effective than just doing the same thing over and over. A new study from Johns Hopkins found that modifying practice sessions led participants to learn a new computer-based motor skill quicker than straight repetition. The results suggest that a process called reconsolidation is at work.

Hacking Knowledge: 77 Ways to Learn Faster, Deeper, and Better If someone granted you one wish, what do you imagine you would want out of life that you haven’t gotten yet? For many people, it would be self-improvement and knowledge. Newcounter knowledge is the backbone of society’s progress. Sketchnotes 101: The Basics of Visual Note-taking Welcome to the second article in the the new Core77 "Sketchnotes Channel" (www.core77.com/sketchnotes) where we'll be exploring the application of visual thinking tools in the worlds of design and creative thinking. So you say you're ready to start sketchnoting. Maybe you're not much of a sketcher but you take a lot of notes, and are interested in making them more meaningful and interesting, but you're afraid your drawings are too crude. For you, it's important to stress that sketchnotes—although they are inherently a visual medium—do not require drawing ability of any kind. Essentially they're about transforming ideas into visual communication; structuring thoughts and giving hierarchy to concepts can be completed with strictly text and a few lines.

Robots and Babies Both Use Curiosity to Learn Humans have a drive to eat. We have a drive to drink. We have a drive to reproduce. Mind Mapping, Concept Mapping, Argument Mapping: What are the differences and Do they Matter? (Martin Davies) Concept mapping, mind mapping and argumentmapping: what are the differences and do they matter? Martin Davies Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2010 Abstract In recent years, academics and educators have begun to use software map-ping tools for a number of education-related purposes.

Visual thinking Visual thinking is a way to organize your thoughts and improve your ability to think and communicate. It’s a way to expand your range and capacity by going beyond the linear world of the written word, list and spreadsheet, and entering the non-linear world of complex spacial relationships, networks, maps and diagrams. It’s also about using tools — like pen and paper, index cards and software tools — to externalize your internal thinking processes, making them more clear, explicit and actionable. Why is visual thinking important? There’s more information at your fingertips than ever before, and yet people are overwhelmed by it. When faced with too much information we shut down.

The Anti-Reading List All successful investors read a lot. It's a common denominator you'll find among most smart people. Charlie Munger once said, "In my whole life, I have known no wise people who didn't read all the time – none, zero." 25 Useful Brainstorming Techniques by Celes on Feb 9, 2009 | ShareThis Email This Post Caught with a problem you cannot solve? Need new ideas and solutions? The process of brainstorming requires you to think out of the box that is keeping you in the problem.

Here's Why, How, And What You Should Doodle To Boost Your Memory And Creativity Did your boss ever catch you covering an important memo with Escher-like scribbles? In high school, did your teacher call you out for drawing on the desk, your sneakers, your skin? Today, the doodle nay-sayers are being drowned out by a growing body of research and opinion that indicates that connects that seemingly distracted scribbling with greater info retention and creativity. Companies like Dell, and Zappos, and Disney are eager for employees to doodle on the job—they even pay consultants to help them. "I can’t tell you how important it is to draw," says Sunni Brown, whose creative consultancy Sunni Brown Ink, teaches "applied visual thinking"— a.k.a doodling—to coders, designers, and even journalists.

The 4 Rituals That Will Make You An Expert At Anything We hear a lot about “10,000 hours” being what it takes to become an expert. But the majority of people totally misunderstand the idea. So I decided to go to the source and talk to the guy who actually created the theory.

Related: