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How to Conduct Scientific Research On the Internet (Without Getting Duped)

How to Conduct Scientific Research On the Internet (Without Getting Duped)

http://lifehacker.com/5985561/how-to-conduct-scientific-research-on-the-internet-without-getting-duped

Related:  search strategies, bookmarkingNews or NoiseGood To Know

Google's uProxy: A Peer-to-Peer Gateway to Internet Freedom In parts of the world where repressive governments control the Internet with unassailable firewalls, netizens don't see the same web that people in other countries can. Now, Google wants to give people in these countries a tool to circumvent those invisible barriers, and defeat censorship. Called uProxy, it is meant to be an easy-to-use, peer-to-peer gateway to the open Internet. With uProxy installed, somebody in Iran could use a friend's Internet to connect with him or her.

10 Search Engines to Explore the Invisible Web No, it’s not Spiderman’s latest web slinging tool but something that’s more real world. Like the World Wide Web. The Invisible Web refers to the part of the WWW that’s not indexed by the search engines. 100 Incredibly Useful and Interesting Web Sites Even as the Web has become more entertaining--and certainly better looking--over the past 15 years, it has also become much more useful and practical, as the 100 sites in this feature will demonstrate. I've organized the sites in the list by the type of task they help you with. It is not a ranking; in each category I recommend sites that specialize in a different area than the others. I've also mixed in a smattering of sites that you might not use every day, but that provide ready answers to specific questions like "How can I learn to rumba?" or "Who should I vote for?" or "How do I make a wallet out of duct tape?"

How Google Dominates Us (book review, includes search theory) In the Plex: How Google Thinks, Works, and Shapes Our Lives by Steven Levy Simon and Schuster, 424 pp., $26.00 I’m Feeling Lucky: The Confessions of Google Employee Number 59 by Douglas Edwards

Taking conspiracy theories seriously A police explosives expert prepares a controlled blast of a suspected parcel bomb in Athens on Nov. 1, 2010. Photo: AP/Thanassis Stavrakis Every now and then, I come across a publication conferring incisive analytic heft to cultural phenomena that society usually considers undeserving of serious consideration. The last great one I read, for example, was Harry Frankfurt’s treatise, On Bullsh*t. When deftly executed, such writing can start with a knowing wink, but quickly plunge the reader into the unexpected depths of seemingly shallow waters.

Google Docs Why Google Docs? Google Apps is a tremendous platform for facilitating online collaboration in your classroom, or beyond. It is freely available on the Web and if you are familiar with other word processors, spreadsheets, and presentation programs, you can easily use Google Docs. The chat feature on presentations makes it possible to create a "permeable classroom" by bringing experts into a lesson to interact with students online. Here are some benefits of Google Docs: It is available from anywhere and anytime with an Internet connection. Study: Belief in Free-Market Economics Linked to Distrust of Science April 22, 2013 | Like this article? Join our email list: Stay up to date with the latest headlines via email.

Ten Search Tools and Tactics Teachers and Students Need to Know I often find myself in conversations with teachers and students about Internet search strategies. Often times the conversation reminds me that what's obvious to me is amazing to someone else. Last week I had that very experience as I taught a couple of teachers some search techniques that they are going to pass along to their students.

Seymour Hersh on Obama, NSA and the 'pathetic' American media Seymour Hersh has got some extreme ideas on how to fix journalism – close down the news bureaus of NBC and ABC, sack 90% of editors in publishing and get back to the fundamental job of journalists which, he says, is to be an outsider. It doesn't take much to fire up Hersh, the investigative journalist who has been the nemesis of US presidents since the 1960s and who was once described by the Republican party as "the closest thing American journalism has to a terrorist". He is angry about the timidity of journalists in America, their failure to challenge the White House and be an unpopular messenger of truth. Don't even get him started on the New York Times which, he says, spends "so much more time carrying water for Obama than I ever thought they would" – or the death of Osama bin Laden.

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