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Teaching Strategies For Improving Student Internet And Keyword Research

Teaching Strategies For Improving Student Internet And Keyword Research

Web Search Strategies The Web may seem like a vast ocean when it comes to finding something you need. Thankfully, search engines can help turn oceans of information into small pools that make finding information easier. Before we dive in, let’s talk a bit about how search works on the Web. Search engines go out and try to account for every word on every webpage. All this information is then organized for easy reference. When you search for a word, the search engine finds all the pages where the word appears, and displays them in the search results. The problem is that there are often too many results. Say you’re looking for a specific kind of fish, and these represent all the websites on the Web. Try to imagine the exact fish and describe it in the search box. But to be a smart searcher, you should know some basic shortcuts. Here’s another shortcut.

Keywords: Learning to Focus Internet Research State Standards NCTE/IRA National Standards for the English Language Arts This resource has been aligned to the Common Core State Standards for states in which they have been adopted. If a state does not appear in the drop-down, CCSS alignments are forthcoming. back to top This lesson has been aligned to standards in the following states. Students apply a wide range of strategies to comprehend, interpret, evaluate, and appreciate texts. Students conduct research on issues and interests by generating ideas and questions, and by posing problems. Students use a variety of technological and information resources (e.g., libraries, databases, computer networks, video) to gather and synthesize information and to create and communicate knowledge.

PBLU.org | Making Projects Click Quintura - visual search engine Quintura - visual search engine Quintura - visual search engine for hotels ⚫ London hotels ⚫ Manchester hotels ⚫ Liverpool hotels ⚫ Bournemouth hotels ⚫ Cambridge hotels ⚫ Blackpool hotels ⚫ Cardiff hotels ⚫ Bristol hotels ⚫ Oxford hotels ⚫ Nottingham hotels ⚫ Edinburgh hotels ⚫ Brighton hotels ⚫ Glasgow hotels ⚫ Birmingham hotels ⚫ Leeds hotels

Keyword Searching vs. Subject Searching Are you wondering which option to choose in the library catalog and databases? These search tips will help you to get relevant results from library databases and catalogs. What's the difference? Here are some key differences between keyword searching and subject searching: When you do a keyword search or an "any word anywhere" search in a library catalog or a database, you can type in words that describe your research topic in any order and retrieve records containing those search terms. A major disadvantage of a keyword search is that it does not take into account the meaning of the words used as search terms, so if a term has more than one meaning (such as "mouse" - computer hardware or rodent?) When you do a subject search or a descriptor search in a library catalog or database, only the subject headings or descriptors are searched for words that match your search terms. How can you find out which subject headings are used? This example is from the ERIC database. Sources

Sweet Search How People Use Search Engines - The Beginners Guide to SEO One of the most important elements to building an online marketing strategy around SEO is empathy for your audience. Once you grasp what the average searcher, and more specifically, your target market, is looking for, you can more effectively reach and keep those users. We like to say "Build for users, not search engines." When users have a bad experience at your site, when they can't accomplish a task or find what they were looking for, this often correlates with poor search engine performance. On the other hand, when users are happy with your website, a positive experience is created, both with the search engine and the site providing the information or result. What are users looking for? "Do" Transactional Queries - Action queries such as buy a plane ticket or listen to a song. When visitors type a query into a search box and land on your site, will they be satisfied with what they find? It all starts with the words typed into a small box. Why invest time, effort and resources on SEO?

Google Search: 10 Questions & Answers to Help You Search Smarter! At the Google Teacher Academy Lisa Thumann awed me with her lively presentation on Google Search. I must do an average of 15 searches a day on a wide range of topics. I search for articles, images, power points presentations, key words, etc. but I had no idea what Google search could do for me and my students. What I know now will radically change how I teach my students to research in the future, so I wanted to share some cool tips with other educators. First, let’s get the lingo down (since I didn’t know the terminology before I started digging into the resources Lisa provided). Your search is called a “query” and you type it in the “query box.” I know that query means question or inquiry, but I had no idea that is what you called the little box on the Google homepage. Note: When I type an example query, I will use brackets [ ] to indicate that it is a query. Here is some quick and interesting information on how Google improves your searches. 1. 2. Do you want to find PDFs, PPTs, or XLS?

How Search Engines Work - The Beginners Guide to SEO Search engines have two major functions: crawling and building an index, and providing search users with a ranked list of the websites they've determined are the most relevant. Imagine the World Wide Web as a network of stops in a big city subway system. Each stop is a unique document (usually a web page, but sometimes a PDF, JPG, or other file). Crawling and IndexingCrawling and indexing the billions of documents, pages, files, news, videos, and media on the World Wide Web. The link structure of the web serves to bind all of the pages together. Links allow the search engines' automated robots, called "crawlers" or "spiders," to reach the many billions of interconnected documents on the web. Once the engines find these pages, they decipher the code from them and store selected pieces in massive databases, to be recalled later when needed for a search query. These monstrous storage facilities hold thousands of machines processing large quantities of information very quickly.

Search operators - Search Help You can use symbols or words in your search to make your search results more precise. Google Search usually ignores punctuation that isn’t part of a search operator. Don’t put spaces between the symbol or word and your search term. A search for site:nytimes.com will work, but site: nytimes.com won’t. Refine image searches Overall Advanced Search Go to Advanced Image Search. Search for an exact image size Right after the word you're looking for, add the text imagesize:widthxheight. Example: imagesize:500x400 Common search techniques Search social media Put @ in front of a word to search social media. Search for a price Put $ in front of a number. Search hashtags Put # in front of a word. Exclude words from your search Put - in front of a word you want to leave out. Search for an exact match Put a word or phrase inside quotes. Search within a range of numbers Put .. between two numbers. Combine searches Put "OR" between each search query. Search for a specific site Search for related sites

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