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Designing 20% Time in Education

Designing 20% Time in Education
A.J. Juliani is a co-founder of Education Is My Life. He currently is a K-12 Technology Staff Developer overseeing a 1:1 initiative. There is a movement happening in education right now. Yes, I said it, so let me repeat: Students are learning what they want in classrooms across the world. What is truly astounding is how interconnected this movement is with the social web. Right now (depending on who you are) there are three possible ways to deal with this type of news: 1. I’ve heard all three “viewpoints” since writing “20% Time (like Google) In My Class” last January. This article is meant to address the three points-of-view above. If you are a #1 above, this will give you the resources and connections to get started today. If you are a #2 above, this will explain how I currently have three teachers in my high school doing the project. If you are a #3 above, this will explain the research and methodology behind 20% Time in education. The “This is Awesome” Group 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 1. Related:  Genius Hour Resourceslearning strategies and techniquesID Projects

6 Principles Of Genius Hour In The Classroom Genius Hour In The Classroom: 6 Principles Of Genius Hour by Terry Heick Update: We did a t-shirt campaign of this graphic last year and it sold decently (if 13 t-shirts can be considered ‘decent.’). It’s still available if you wanted a t-shirt with a kind of learning model on it. Genius Hour in the classroom is an approach to learning built around student curiosity, self-directed learning, and passion-based work. In traditional learning, teachers map out academic standards, and plan units and lessons based around those standards. Genius Hour is most notably associated with Google, where employees are able to spend up to 20% of their time working on projects they’re interested in and passionate about. What’s The Difference? Genius Hour provides students freedom to design their own learning during a set period of time during school. Sense of Purpose Students must find their own sense of purpose in what they study, make sense of, and create. Design Inquiry & Navigation Create Socialization

The Research Behind 20% Time Since experimenting with “20% Time” in my class a few years ago, I’ve been fascinated by the research and history of this practice in education and the business world. This has led me down a long road to finally writing a book (to be published by Routledge) on inquiry-driven education and 20% time. During that time I’ve had hundreds of conversations with fellow teachers practicing 20% time in some way shape or form (Genius Hour, Passion Projects, Choose2Matter etc). Lately, through the book-writing process I’ve had some more in-depth interviews about inquiry-based education, and I’ve spent a great deal of time researching the beginnings and reasons behind 20% time’s effectiveness. Today I want to shed some light on the research behind 20% time, and more broadly, inquiry-driven education. When folks such as Ewan McIntosh (who I really respect as an educator) stir up the pot with posts like this one, I believe the best way to defend inquiry as a practice is to look at the results. 1. 2.

Why the 'no make-up selfies' campaign raised £2m The selfie has reached a new zenith this week, thanks to the No Make-Up Selfie for Cancer Awareness campaign which has seen £2m raised for Cancer Research UK in the space of just a few days. But how did it happen? The #nomakeupselfie started trending on Tuesday as women posted pictures of themselves without make-up on Twitter and Facebook, and urged their friends to do the same. Cancer awareness became the theme, selfie posters pledged donations to cancer charities and CRUK set up a text number to make donating even easier. But the cancer charity did not kick-start the trend - it grew organically, making a huge impact on social media and getting attention in national newspapers and on radio and TV news. So why did it go viral? No-one quite knows how the trend started. Or it may have been a reaction to the negative comments directed towards 81-year-old actress Kim Novak following the same event. "This campaign has captured the imagination. "You can lose the depth of message.

20-Time In Education Inspire. Create. Innovate. Genius Hour Manifesto Denise Krebs, Gallit Zvi, Hugh McDonald and Joy Kirr came together to discuss “Genius Hour”. Each of these teachers has been running Genius Hour in his/her classroom and writing about their experiences online. This is the “Genius Hour Manifesto”: A guide to anyone who wants to know WHAT Genius Hour is, WHERE the idea came from, HOW to facilitate it in the classroom, WHY it is a next-practice in education, and HOW to get involved. Enjoy! What is Genius Hour? Denise: Genius hour is student-driven, passion-based learning. After seeing that tweet, I did a Google search for genius hour and Dan Pink’s blog post “The Genius Hour: How 60 minutes a week can electrify your job” came up. Last year, Gallit and I started the #geniushour Twitter chat. Hugh: I first learned of this term after reading Denise Krebs blog and the tweet (referenced above) where she referenced an article titled “Genius Hour” referenced on Daniel Pink’s Blog. I immediately loved the idea and retweeted Denise’s tweet.

Give your students 20% time to do whatever they want | I teach. I think. "Seriously? You're going to let us do whatever we want for 20% of our time in English class?" "I'm skeptical." "That's awesome." Taking Google's lead, and inspired by Dan Pink's book, Drive, I decided to take the plunge and give my students the kind of radical autonomy they both suggest, and I gave my students 20% of their time in my English class to pursue a project of their choosing. Rules and expectations Project ideas build a tutoring network of high school students helping middle school studentsdesign a complex videogame map using Valve's SDKstart a business selling originally designed t-shirts and accessorieslaunch a web-design start-up for local organizations and businesseswrite a graphic novelmake a stop-motion animated movie of a scene from Macbethwrite a backpacking guide for teenage girlsinterview local senior citizens and document their historyrecord and produce a full-length album Failure is an option Here is a video of clips from their final 20% talks. My own successful failures

Bentley Ad Shot Using iPhone 5s, Assembled on iPad Air Bentley's newest ad, Intelligent Details, was filmed entirely with Apple's mobile devices. Photographers used the iPhone 5s to shoot video and then put it together using an iPad Air, according to details provided on the making of the ad at the end of the spot (via The Loop). Shot in New York, a quick behind the scenes look at the black and white film on the $300,000 Bentley Mulsanne reveals that it was filmed with an iPhone 5s, using specialized lenses, mounts, and cases to produce high-quality video on par with far more expensive camera equipment. The short video was then assembled using an iPad Air and the iMovie app with an attached custom keyboard case. Bentley's ad is the newest spot to be filmed using Apple tools, but it's far from the first. Searching for Sugar Man, a documentary that won an Academy Award back in February of 2013, was also partially shot using an iPhone.

The Genius Hour Design Cycle: A Process For Planning - 3. Some students need a push in the right direction Some students will come up with projects that are too simple with answers that could be easily Googled. We introduced the students to ‘High Order Thinking Skills’ and built these into the planning forms students complete. 4. A student might have a passion for surfing and decide they are going to write a book about the history of the sport. 5. It can be hard to say no to a project but some are just not feasible. 6. Some projects will clearly take longer than you have available, others are simply too large in scale or will rely on the involvement of too many people. Creating a detailed timeline with estimates of how long each phase will take is beneficial on many levels at this stage. 7. One of the challenges for some students has been the ever changing project. 8. Over the years we refined the level of planning the students were required to do before commencing on their projects in earnest. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13.

The Genius Hour: How 60 minutes a week can electrify your job Lots of people believe that a single individual can’t make a difference in an organization. Lots of people, it turns out, are wrong. Take the case of Jen Shefner. She’s an assistant vice president at Columbia Credit Union in Vancouver, WA, in charge of the credit union’s online and mobile services. Jen grooved on Google’s 20% time and Atlassian’s Fedex Days – and wanted to bring that sort of noncommissioned work to her department. Each week, employees can take a Genius Hour — 60 minutes to work on new ideas or master new skills. Of course, an hour a week for every employee isn’t much time. The boss pitches in. Implementation matters. It’s on the schedule. “Great ideas come from every level,” Jen says. When are you going to give it a try?

8 Things Everybody Ought to Know About Concentrating “Music helps me concentrate,” Mike said to me glancing briefly over his shoulder. Mike was in his room writing a paper for his U.S. History class. On his desk next to his computer sat crunched Red Bulls, empty Gatorade bottles, some extra pocket change and scattered pieces of paper. In the pocket of his sweat pants rested a blaring iPod with a chord that dangled near the floor, almost touching against his Adidas sandals. On his computer sat even more stray objects than his surrounding environment. Mike made a shift about every thirty seconds between all of the above. Do you know a person like this? The Science Behind Concentration In the above account, Mike’s obviously stuck in a routine that many of us may have found ourselves in, yet in the moment we feel it’s almost an impossible routine to get out of. When we constantly multitask to get things done, we’re not multitasking, we’re rapidly shifting our attention. Phase 1: Blood Rush Alert Phase 2: Find and Execute Phase 3: Disengagement

#BBCtrending: Tunisia’s rubbish selfie trend 27 May 2014Last updated at 14:04 ET BBC Trending What's popular and why Upgrade your KWL Chart to the 21st Century One of the take aways from the Curriculum Mapping Institute this past week was that it brought an upgrade to THE trusted KWL (Know, What to Know and Learned) Chart to the forefront. It seems a no brainer…one of those things… “I should have thought about it”… So what is this upgrade all about? An “H” snuck into the Acronym! What does this “H” stand for”? I started out by searching Google, which immediately wanted to correct my search term and showed me the traditional “KWL chart” results. The top search results turned out mostly downloadable files for templates, which was quiet interesting as there were several explanations in these tutorials what the “H” could stand for: HOW can we find the answers to these questions? In direct relation to our quest to bring Information literacy in the 21st century to our teachers and students, the “HOW will we find the information” sticks out right away for me. My Twitter network was much better in helping me extend my search for KWHL. Related 12. 8. 29.

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