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Clay Shirky: How the Internet will (one day) transform government

Clay Shirky: How the Internet will (one day) transform government

http://www.ted.com/talks/clay_shirky_how_the_internet_will_one_day_transform_government.html

Liquid Democracy: Web Platform Makes Professor Most Powerful Pirate Martin Haase doesn't have to give any hard-hitting speeches at party conferences, nor does he spend time at board meetings or in back rooms to hone his power. When the 49-year-old professor wants to engage in politics, he just opens his laptop and logs in to Liquid Feedback, the Pirate Party's online platform for discussing and voting on political proposals. For hours at a time, the political newcomers (the Pirates first formed in Germany in 2006) discuss their party's goals, and each member has the opportunity to use Liquid Feedback as a platform to promote his or her positions -- which can range from the Pirate Party fielding its own presidential candidate to the appeal to deescalate the conflict with Iran. It isn't always easy to secure a majority for a given cause on the site.

Better Than Free [Translations: Belarusian, Chinese, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Polish, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Turkish] The internet is a copy machine. At its most foundational level, it copies every action, every character, every thought we make while we ride upon it. In order to send a message from one corner of the internet to another, the protocols of communication demand that the whole message be copied along the way several times. IT companies make a lot of money selling equipment that facilitates this ceaseless copying.

Drink This! Cup Show 2014 Photos » Workhouse Ceramics Drink This! Workhouse International Ceramic Cup Show 2014 Drink This! The power of passion - Richard St. John Passion is contagious, so hang around people who love what they do. It sure beats hanging around people who hate their jobs. Also, you can read, listen, or watch successful people and celebrities being interviewed on radio, TV, and the web.

Delegative democracy Delegative democracy is a form of democratic control whereby voting power is vested in delegates, rather than representatives. This term is a generic description of either already existing or proposed popular control apparatuses. The delegative form[edit] Direct Democracy, 2.0 Angelika Warmuth/DPA, via Agence France-Presse — Getty Images Members of the Pirate Party attended a conference in Neumünster, Germany, last month. I FIRST took real notice of the Pirates last summer during the campaign for city elections in Berlin. German electioneering is quaint, even faintly musty by American standards.

The Printer That Can Print A 2,500 Square Foot House In 20 Hours. We have seen huge advancements in 3D printing. We’ve even seen oversized wrenches printed that measure 1.2 meters in length. Now, we can print an entire 2,500 sqft house in 20 hours. In the TED Talk video below, Behrokh Khoshnevis, a professor of Industrial & Systems Engineering at the University of Southern California (USC), demonstrates automated construction, using 3D printers to build an entire house in 20 hours. In manufacturing we use a process called CAD/CAM (computer-aided design / computer-aided manufacturing). 3D models are designed on a computer and then manufactured using CNC Machines or 3D printers. The design is manufactured into a physical object automatically, with instruction from 3D computer model to physical object without human interface.

Proxy voting Proxy voting is a form of voting whereby some members of a decision-making body may delegate their voting power to other members of the same body to vote in their absence, and/or to select additional representatives. A person so designated is called a "proxy" and the person designating him or her is called a "principal". Proxy appointments can be used to form a voting bloc that can exercise greater influence in deliberations or negotiations. Proxy voting is a particularly important practice with respect to corporations; in the United States, investment advisers often vote proxies on behalf of their client accounts.[1] The United States parliamentary manual Riddick's Rules of Procedure notes that, under proxy voting, voting for officers should be done by ballot, due to the difficulties involved in authentication if a member simply calls out, "I cast 17 votes for Mr. X

The Internet is not a Surveillance State… In his March 16, 2013 opinion column on CNN.com, Bruce Schneier called the Internet a “surveillance state”. In the piece, Schneier complains that the Internet now serves as a platform which enables massive and pervasive surveillance by the State. State sponsored and ordained surveillance, however, is not synonymous with the Internet. Schneier’s use of the word ‘state’ is ill-advised, his goading conclusion thereby misses the mark.

Nanoscribe Will Sell a Micro 3-D Printer That Creates Tiny Structures in Seconds Nanoscribe, a spin-off from the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology in Germany, has developed a tabletop 3-D microprinter that can create complicated microstructures 100 times faster than is possible today. “If something took one hour to make, it now takes less than one minute,” says Michael Thiel, chief scientific officer at Nanoscribe. While 3-D printing of toys, iPhone covers, and jewelry continues to grab headlines (see “The Difference Between Makers and Manufacturers”), much of 3-D printing’s impact could be at a much smaller scale. Micrometer-scale printing has shown promise for making medical and electronic devices. Thiel says it should be possible to speed up his company’s microprinting technique even more in the future. Nanoscribe plans to start selling its machine in the second half of this year.

Je me posais les mêmes questions mais il y a un énorme filtre à l'entrée. Les seuls personnes qui vont participer sont celles capables de participer techniquement, que ce soit du point de vue intellectuel ou du point de vue légal. Je ne sais pas combien de gens ça fait du coup mais on perd facilement un ou deux ordres de grandeurs. by baptistecouly Oct 16

Excellent. J'ai l'impression que les coûts de mise en place de ce système seraient ridicules mais j'ai du mal à me représenter l'organisation qu'il faudrait construire. Pour linux, il y avait Torvalds qui s'occupait des merge, mais quid des organisations vraiment gigantesques ?? Comment procéder sans découpage du périmètre fonctionnel ? Si un ensemble inconnu d'acteurs peuvent s'exprimer sur un sujet, comment faire naitre le consensus ? by ferdma Oct 16

Un "absolutely must-see". C'est la première fois que je vois un exemple concret d'application de l'open-source/l'informatique/l'interwebz à un problème de gouvernement (le processus législatif) et que je n'ai pas envie de crier bullshit. by baptistecouly Oct 7

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