background preloader

Rachel Botsman: The currency of the new economy is trust

Rachel Botsman: The currency of the new economy is trust

http://www.ted.com/talks/rachel_botsman_the_currency_of_the_new_economy_is_trust.html

Dieter Suhr, Neutral Money Network Prof. Dr. Dieter Suhr (+) University of Augsburg The collaborative economy in your neighborhood: welcome to StreetBank The idea that neighbors can share their resources efficiently is not new, however there are very few examples of successful initiatives to date. Many sharing schemes failed after only a few years. A successful example of such a model is StreetBank, a platform in England that is growing steadily. We took a moment to chat with Sam Stephens, StreetBank’s founder, about the reasons for the site’s growth. StreetBank is an online platform that allows neighbors to collectively share items they possess individually.

Local currency See Emissions Reduction Currency System for community based initiatives aimed at emission reduction In economics, a local currency, in its common usage, is a currency not backed by a national government (and not necessarily legal tender), and intended to trade only in a small area. As a tool of fiscal localism, local moneys can raise awareness of the state of the local economy, especially among those who may be unfamiliar or uncomfortable with traditional bartering.[citation needed]

Metacurrency Collabathon: a wealth system After Sibos, Q4 is usually the period of the year when I try to re-boot, to refresh my sources, to be a sponge and take-in new knowledge. It’s when I start painting for the next year. When the themes and trends for next year start emerging. I wanted to get a much better feel for what this world of alternative and complementary currencies was all about, and decided to join a week-end “Collabathon” organized by Art Brock (@artbrock) and Eric Harris-Braun (@zippy314), the founders of The Metacurrency Project. In the slipstream of the Contact Summit, they wanted to gather the minds to work on NextNet ideas and tools. From their site:

The Freecycle Network On May 1st, 2003, Deron Beal sent out the first e-mail announcing The Freecycle Network™ to about 30 or 40 friends and a handful of nonprofits in Tucson, Arizona. At the time Deron founded The Freecycle Network, he worked with a small nonprofit organization, RISE, which provides recycling services to downtown businesses and transitional employment to Tucsonans in need. As the team recycled, rather than watching perfectly good items being thrown away, they found themselves calling or driving around to see if various local nonprofits could use them. Thinking there had to be an easier way, Beal set up that first Freecycle e-mail group in a way that permitted everyone in Tucson to give and to get. Freecycle was off and running.

Political Currency According to the report in 9to5mac, Healthbook not only will track things like how much exercise and sleep youre getting, but also your blood pressure, your blood sugar levels, and much more. It appears extremely comprehensive. Sure, the images may be fake. But as a thought experiment, lets pretend its legit. All that collection will be great, but without a way to not just collate them, but make them meaningful, it runs the risk of becoming data clutter. There are already devices that can collect the data referenced in these imageseven the hard-to-find stuff. Is Sharing Illegal? In Many Cases, Yes. Governments have their work cut out for them in keeping pace with innovation, especially as mobile, social and cloud technologies allow for new business models that, in the eyes of regulators, threaten consumer safety and incumbent industries. The most poignant current-day example of the tug-of-war between government and technology entrepreneurs is the legal quagmire many “sharing,” or “collaborative consumption,” companies face in the cities they operate. The problem, at least for home- and car-sharing services, is multifaceted: they’re agitating dozens of stakeholders, operating in uncharted territories, and legally indefinable. And indefinable is hard to regulate. You can’t talk about legal issues surrounding ‘sharing’ without talking about the industry’s ‘800-pound gorilla’: home rental service Airbnb. “Government is usually the last one to pick up on innovations,” Turner said.

Alternative currency An alternative currency (or private currency) is any currency used as an alternative to the dominant national or multinational currency systems (usually referred to as national or fiat money). They are created by an individual, corporation, or organization, they can be created by national, state, or local governments, or they can arise naturally as people begin to use a certain commodity as a currency. Mutual credit is a form of alternative currency, and thus any form of lending that does not go through the banking system can be considered a form of alternative currency. When used in combination with or when designed to work in combination with national or multinational fiat currencies they can be referred to as complementary currency. Most complementary currencies are also local currencies and are limited to a certain region. Barters are another type of alternative currency.

La confiance dégradée en valeur marchande, capitalisable. by a.mary Sep 25

Related: