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Practical Arduino: News

Practical Arduino: News
Fri, Apr 9 2010: Filed under Projects Posted by Jonathan Oxer When whittling down the list of projects for Practical Arduino I never expected the Weather Station Receiver project to be one that gained so much attention. To be honest I was dubious about whether enough people would build it to justify its inclusion, but felt that even if it wasn't built very often it was still worthwhile as an example of how to do signal timing analysis and bitstream decoding. I'm glad we put it in, because it seems to be one of the more popular projects! Reader Kelsey Jordahl contacted me yesterday with details of a modified version that reads data from a La Crosse TX4U system, using the circuit from Practical Arduino but with modified software to deal with the different data format.

http://www.practicalarduino.com/

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Secret-Knock Gumball Machine One of the best things about exhibiting at Maker Faire is giving attendees a challenge. For the 2010 Maker Faire Bay Area, I decided to combine a past project of mine, a door lock that opens only when you give a secret knock, with a standard crowd pleaser: candy. The result was this Secret-Knock Gumball Machine, which tempted and tested the crowds at Maker Faire to guess the right rhythm and receive a treat. Since the knock was not terribly secret (I happily handed out hints), it distributed hundreds of gumballs over the event’s two days. The “secret” knock defaults to the famous “Shave and a Haircut” rhythm, but you can program custom knocks by simply pressing a button and knocking a new pattern. The machine only listens for the rhythm, not the tempo, so the correct knock will dispense a treat whether you perform it fast or slow.

Arduino Arduino is an open-source computer hardware and software company, project and user community that designs and manufactures kits for building digital devices and interactive objects that can sense and control the physical world.[1] Arduino boards may be purchased preassembled, or as do-it-yourself kits; at the same time, the hardware design information is available for those who would like to assemble an Arduino from scratch. The first Arduino was introduced in 2005. The project leaders sought to provide an inexpensive and easy way for hobbyists, students, and professionals to create devices that interact with their environment using sensors and actuators. Common examples for beginner hobbyists include simple robots, thermostats and motion detectors. Adafruit Industries estimated in mid-2011 that over 300,000 official Arduinos had been commercially produced,[3] and in 2013 that 700,000 official boards were in users' hands.[4]

0 Motivation When I bought such a motor control shield recently, it came as a kit without any instructions. I could find the circuit diagram and list of parts on the Internet after some searching, but almost nothing on assembly and how to control it. Therefore I decided to create this page to share with the community what I learned so far. Products Quickly create graphic applications for NETMF devices using windowed controls, prompts, menuing and more! Complete driver for decoding NEMA messages from most serial GPS units This new Operating Environment allows you to load hardware drivers on the fly, run applictions, manage multiple users, and much more! Open source game engines for .NET Micro Framework arduino meets processing - PUSHBUTTON The Arduino meets Processing project intends to make it as easy as possible for anyone to explore the world of physical computing. All you need is an Arduino board as well as the Arduino and Processing software, which you can download on their project websites. On this website we explain how to:

Charlieplexing LEDs with an AVR ATmega328 (or Arduino) Charlieplexing is an ingenius method for controlling many LEDs without using many microcontroller pins. You can turn on or off one LED at a time. To light more than one LED at a time, you can scan the LEDs by turning a sequence of them on and off really fast. The number of LEDs you can control is determined by this formula: N pins * (N pins – 1). Bionic Arduino – Introduction to Microcontrollers with Arduino Bionic Arduino is a set of four 3-hour classes in November 2007 hosted by Machine Project and taught by Tod E. Kurt. It is an introduction to microcontroller programming and interfacing with the real world using the Arduino physical computing platform. It focuses on building new physical senses and making motion with the building blocks of robotics, using Arduino as a platform. In the class, participants are shown and experiment with the Arduino’s capabilities and learn the basics of common microcontroller interfacing, such as: digital output to control lights and LEDs, digital input to read switches and buttons, analog output to control motor position or LED brightness, and analog input to read sensor inputs. The class assumes no previous electronics knowledge, though it does assume a little programming knowledge.

Yet another laser cutter When my EPSON 830U decided not to work for me anymore (printing heads clogged) I thought I could make some use of the still working mechanics of the printer. It's based on a couple of stepper motors for both axis of motion (print head and paper feed). So I replaced the original power supply and drive electronics for an arduino board and an stepper motor driver from Adafruit industries.

MP3 and MIDI Codec - VS1053B Description:VS1053b from VLSI is a single-chip Ogg Vorbis/MP3/AAC/WMA/MIDI audio decoder and an IMA ADPCM and user-loadable Ogg Vorbis encoder. It contains a high-performance, proprietary low-power DSP processor core VS DSP4, working data memory, 16 KiB instruction RAMand 0.5+ KiB data RAM for user applications running simultaneously with any built-in decoder, serial control and input data interfaces, upto 8 general purpose I/O pins, an UART, as well as a high-quality variable-sample rate stereo ADC (mic, line, line + mic or 2×line) and stereo DAC, followed by an earphone amplifier and a common voltage buffer. VS1053b receives its input bitstream through a serial input bus, which it listens to as a system slave. The input stream is decoded and passed through a digital volume control to an 18-bit over-sampling, multi-bit, sigma-delta DAC. The decoding is controlled via a serial control bus. Available in a LQFP-48 pin 7x7x1.4mm package.

Spooky Projects – Introduction to Microcontrollers with Arduino Spooky Projects is a set of four 3-hour classes in October 2006 hosted by Machine Project and taught by Tod E. Kurt. It is an introduction to microcontroller programming and interfacing with the real world using the Arduino physical computing platform. In the class, participants are shown and experiment with the Arduino’s capabilities and learn the basics of common microcontroller interfacing, such as: digital output to control lights and LEDs, digital input to read switches and buttons, analog output to control motor position or LED brightness, and analog input to read sensor inputs. From these tools all sorts of interesting projects can be created.

RGB Liquid Crystal Display Tutorial Step #2: PrevNext Now we will prepare everything to start connecting to the Arduino. Insert the display into the breadboard with the pot next to it. Then connect 5V and GND to the breadboard rails as I have done.

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