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Online Computer Science Courses In its purest form, computer science is the research and development of technology that solves specific problems. Computer science has brought the world smart phones, GPS systems, the gaming industry and tablet computing, along with technological developments that assist government, industry and medicine. In addition to creating new technology, computer scientists also make improvements to existing technology and study the ways computers can make our lives easier.

Six of the Best Open Source Data Mining Tools It is rightfully said that data is money in today’s world. Along with the transition to an app-based world comes the exponential growth of data. However, most of the data is unstructured and hence it takes a process and method to extract useful information from the data and transform it into understandable and usable form. This is where data mining comes into picture. Plenty of tools are available for data mining tasks using artificial intelligence, machine learning and other techniques to extract data. Free Lectures Online Whether your goal is to earn a promotion, graduate at the top of your class, or just accelerate your life, lectures can help get you there. Our archives of lectures cover a huge range of topics and have all been handpicked and carefully designed by experienced instructors throughout the world who are dedicated to helping you take the next step toward meeting your career goals. Lifelong learns can turn their free time turn into self-improvement time. The online lectures on this list are more than lecture notes or a slideshow on a topic -- they were designed for audiences like you, with carefully sequenced themes and topics taught by veteran educators, and often with additional resources for your own independent study. The lectures are available to anybody, completely free of charge. Lecture courses are a valid and vital learning tool, and may be one of the best methods of learning available.

Sharism 分享主义 - default Get It Louder Sharism exhibition in Shanghai. Sharism is a term for the motivation and philosophy behind the collaborative building of value that results from sharing content and ideas. Inspired by user-generated content, Sharism states that the act of sharing something within a community produces a proper value for each of its participants: "the more you share, the more you receive".[1] As knowledge is produced through crowdsourcing, this new kind of shared ownership leads to the production of goods and services where value is distributed through the contributions of everyone involved. History of the term[edit] Plans ZeroPC offers FREE, Basic and Pro premium accounts. Basic and Pro premium accounts offer users who require additional storage and expanded feature. Below please find the Pricing & Comparison for each account type.

Supporting tools for decentralized metadata - Creative Commons The use of decentralized metadata to drive discovery allows creators and curators to publish information about works without relying on a central authority, and allows developers to utilize that data with seeking permission from a gate keeper. However, self publishing requires a certain degree of technical expertise from creators and curators. Two tools can help ease this burden and aid deployment of the necessary metadata. A Validator would help publishers and curators understand how their resources are ingested and processed by DiscoverEd (and other tools). A Curation Tool would allow users to identify resources — individually, as an ad hoc group, or as part of an institutional team — and label them with quality, review, or other metadata.

Census – The Ada Initiative We ran the first Ada Initiative Census of open technology and culture in March 2011. We aimed to find out where the women are, and how they perceive their community. We're ready to share the results of this, our first project under the Ada Initiative banner. Creative Barcode and Creative Commons: complementary bedfellows Just six months after its launch, and five months after the IPKat posted this little piece, Creative Barcode has attracted a good deal of attention, not least on account of a question which many folk have asked the IPKat and others: “How does Creative Barcode differ from Creative Commons?” Maxine Horn, CEO of Creative Barcode, has kindly accepted the Kat's invitation to explain: "The shortest answer is that Creative Barcode and Creative Commons they are complementary. However, they do have a few pertinent points of difference. Let’s start with what both organisations have in common. They are both not for profit organizations.

» Blog Archives » 10 Minute Blog #5: Openness and Interoperability May 14th, 2011 by Naomi Korn Further to a dialogue (chat, emails and tweets) with Amber Thomas (@ambrouk) and some head spinning time spent on logic – some interesting thoughts on openness and interoperability of CC licences (not what you would expect!) 1. CC Zero, CC BY, CC BY SA are the most open of the CC suite of licences – in that order

The Quiet Revolution in Open Learning - Commentary By Kevin Carey In the late days of March 2010, Congressional negotiators dealt President Obama's community-college reform agenda what seemed like a fatal blow. A year later, it appears that, remarkably, the administration has fashioned the ashes of that defeat into one of the most innovative federal higher-education programs ever conceived. Hardly anyone has noticed. Obama originally called for $12-billion in new spending on community-college infrastructure and degree completion.

The Free Speech Critique of Copyright Mistake Did you hear that Florida just outlawed sex? This was pointed out by Southern Fried Scientist, after reading of a Florida bill that prohibits “knowing sexual conduct or sexual contact with an animal.” Humans are, after all, animals, so by definition, Florida has just made normal sexual relations a crime. Obviously, that’s not what happened. As Rick Hasen at Election Law Blog points out, “A court facing a question of interpreting the statute would almost certainly read the statute’s use of the term ‘animals’ as ‘non-human animals,’ both to avoid absurdity and to conform with (1) the intent of the drafters; (2) the purpose of the statute; and (3) a commonly used (if scientifically inaccurate) understanding of the term ‘animal’ to exclude humans.” But it does provide a good example of language in the law.

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