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Free Spanish Lessons

Free Spanish Lessons

http://www.123teachme.com/learn_spanish/beginner/

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Spanish Numbers Home / Grammar / Topic Notes: The written lesson is below.Links to quizzes, tests, etc. are to the left. Here are the numbers 1-10: Amusing Spanish Idioms See also Spanish Slang, Spanish Words & Phrases An idiom is a phrase that is understood to have a meaning different from its literal meaning. For example, in English when we say “it’s raining cats and dogs” we mean it’s raining heavily, it’s a downpour. Like the cats and dogs example, idioms are fun, colorful expressions and the direct translation of an idiom from one language to another is often hilarious. Below are some of my favorite Spanish idioms. This is not an exhaustive list of Spanish idioms but rather a selection of amusing Spanish idioms that at one time or another caught my attention.

How to Teach Commands to First Year Spanish Language Students written by: Heather Marie Kosur • edited by: Rebecca Scudder • updated: 3/2/2012 The following article describes a first year Spanish lesson plan for teaching basic commands in Spanish and includes examples to illustrate the Spanish imperative verb form. An optional refresher on the imperative mood in English is provided. Imperative Mood Lesson PlanThe following lesson plan can be used by Spanish teachers to introduce the imperative mood to English-speaking Spanish students. The first part introduces the imperative to students by explaining the use of the verb form in English.

17 Fun Games to Play in Spanish Class! 1. ARROZ CON PAN: Game of elimination played in a circle where the students chant “Arroz con pan (3x) y sal” then a number is called out and counted around the circle. 2. CIERTO - FALSO: A person (often the teacher) stands between the stands of the trees and calls out phrases related to the class's latest vocabulary. If the statement is true about the student, they must try to run to the other side without being tagged.

Formal & Plural commands in Spanish The formal and commands are polite requests that you make of adults who are not close friends. This includes patients if you are a doctor (unless your patients are young children), clients for businessmen, even waiters since in most Hispanic countries you will not find a teenager bouncing over to your table with a "Hey! I'm Jim!" name-tag on. When in doubt, use the Ud. (usted) form unless you are invited to do otherwise. Spain: Spanish Language Welcome to our guide to Spain! This is useful for anyone researching Spanish culture, customs, manners, etiquette, values and wanting to understand the people better. You may be going to Spain on business, for a visit or even hosting Spanish colleagues or clients in your own country. Remember this is only a very basic level introduction and is not meant to stereotype all Spanish people you may meet! Facts and Statistics

Spanish Pronouns A Pronoun in Spanish as well as in English is like a shortcut to refer to a noun, a word that stands for or represents a noun or noun phrase, a pronoun is identified only in the context of the sentence in which they are used. So you must have a prior idea about who "he or she" "él or ella" is. In English we find "me, her, what, that, his", In Spanish they're used pretty much the same way, the main difference is that in Spanish most pronouns have a gender, masculine or feminine and rarely neuter to unknown objects or ideas. Spanish Idiom Dictionary Spanish idioms are essential to understanding and communicating with native speakers. Because Spanish is spoken in so many different countries, extra care is required when learning idioms. Make sure to pay attention to who is saying what under what circumstances before you attempt to use anything but the most common expression.

Home Home Activities: Adjectives & Nouns Adverbs Articles Command Forms Comparisons Conditional Tense Demonstrative Adjectives Future Tense Gustar Verbs like Gustar Interrogative Words Negative/Affirmative Words Numbers Past Participle Perfect Tenses Por vs Para Prepositions with qtvr movie Present Participle (gerund) Present Progressive Tense Present Tense Preterite Tense Preterites w/ Irregular Meanings Preterite vs Imperfect Pronouns DO Pronouns IO Pronunciation Reflexive Verbs Relative Pronouns Saber vs Conocer Ser vs Estar Sequence of Tenses Si Clauses Subjunctive Mood (present) Subjunctive mood (past) Time-¿Qué hora es? Tener-idiomatic expressions Unplanned events with SE Verb conjugation charts: Present tense Preterite tense Present subjunctive Imperfect subjunctive

Home Home Activities: Adjectives & Nouns Adverbs Articles Command Forms Comparisons Conditional Tense Demonstrative Adjectives Future Tense Gustar Verbs like Gustar Interrogative Words Negative/Affirmative Words Numbers Past Participle Perfect Tenses Por vs Para Prepositions with qtvr movie Present Participle (gerund) Present Progressive Tense Present Tense Preterite Tense Preterites w/ Irregular Meanings Preterite vs Imperfect Pronouns DO Pronouns IO Pronunciation Reflexive Verbs Relative Pronouns Saber vs Conocer Ser vs Estar Sequence of Tenses Si Clauses Subjunctive Mood (present) Subjunctive mood (past) Time-¿Qué hora es? Tener-idiomatic expressions Unplanned events with SE

Spanish Idioms Webster's dictionary defines an idiom as: "1) the dialect of a people, region,etc., 2) the usual way in which words of a language are joined together to express thought; 3) a conventional phrase or expression having a meaning different from the literal; 4) a characteristic style." Webster's New World Dictionary,Compact School & Office Edition - The World Publishing Company, 1967 The use of idioms allows you to expand your fluency in a language. Where in English we might use the common phrase "Can't hold a candle to" when discussing a person's ability, such as in the sentence "As far as her ability to use idioms, no one can hold a candle to her.

Fiestas & Festivals in Spain Spanish fiestas symbolise the very essence of Spain and the Spanish people. They're colourful, vibrant, usually extremely noisy, often chaotic and always great fun. The origins of many of the country's countless fiestas lie in religious feasts, often honouring a patron saint. It's the same in northern Europe where many public holidays were born out of religious 'holy days'.

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