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17 Fun Games to Play in Spanish Class!

17 Fun Games to Play in Spanish Class!
1. ARROZ CON PAN: Game of elimination played in a circle where the students chant “Arroz con pan (3x) y sal” then a number is called out and counted around the circle. 2. CIERTO - FALSO: A person (often the teacher) stands between the stands of the trees and calls out phrases related to the class's latest vocabulary. If the statement is true about the student, they must try to run to the other side without being tagged. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. For example: Mano a mano –they put together their hands. Make it more fun by calling different body parts Codo a rodilla-they put together their elbow and knee. Variation: You can also use flash cards for this game. 10. A student uncovers two cards. 11. “Pesca, pesca, pescador, Pesca un pez, ¿De qué color?” The student who is fishing must say the color. Variation: Write questions on the fish, and instead of saying the color, the student will have to answer the question. 12. 13. class chants: “¡Pasa la bola, pasa la bola, pasa la bola, para!.” Carolina Related:  GRADO

Teaching Resources for Spanish Class, Spanish4Teachers.org Spanish Yesterday I did a new lesson with my 7th graders that reinforced everything I've always felt about integrating culture into language study. It was one of those lessons where you just WISH the principal would pop in to see how things are going. (Of course, they never pop in THEN, they pop in right when you're troubleshooting a technology problem and some kid needs a band-aid and another kid needs you to sign his pre-arranged absence note and give him the work for the next 3 days because he's going to Disney World and...) AND it was one of those lessons in BOTH periods, which is even better because it's much more likely that it's really appealing to a wide range of kids, and not one of those things that works like magic with one group and the next group acts like they're about to fall asleep. It was one of my favorite kinds of lessons -- a made-from-scratch lesson that integrates culture into language practice.

5 Kids Videos That Will Definitely Teach You Spanish Want a way to watch videos for entertainment and Spanish learning? Can’t quite understand Spanish telenovelas? Confused by Spanish movies and TV? Spanish videos for kids could be just the thing for you. You don’t have to be a total newbie to enjoy them—videos for kids cover a range of age groups and Spanish skill levels. Take a look at what’s available on the Internet, and you might be surprised how helpful these colorful videos can be when learning Spanish! Why Watch Spanish Videos for Kids? Easy to understand. How to Utilize Spanish Videos for Kids Do you feel like just watching these shows isn’t enough on its own? You’re probably right. If you’re serious about learning Spanish, watching videos is far more effective as a learning strategy if you try to actively watch, listen and record new vocabulary. To do this, you’ll need to: Most of all, enjoy the experience and try to relax. A great place to practice learning Spanish with authentic video content is FluentU. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Infografía: El mapa más ‘cool’ del mundo hispanohablante | Zambombazo ¿Cómo se dice ‘cool’ en español? La respuesta no es para nada sencilla. Depende de muchos factores, por ejemplo, el país, la región, la clase socioeconómica y la edad del locutor. Además las palabras cool cambian con cada generación. Dicho eso, este mapa tipográfico nos dará una idea básica de las palabras bacanas que se usan por allí. :) Descarga gratuita El mapa más ‘cool’ del mundo hispanohablante (pdf) Póster Visita Redbubble para comprarlo como póster o camiseta Propuestas didácticas 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Proegresados: EXPRESIONES INCORRECTAS VS EXPRESIONES CORRECTAS. MEJORA TU LENGUAJE Expresiones incorrectas. Tomado de: A continuación presentamos algunas expresiones incorrectas que son utilizadas con mucha frecuencia. Toma nota sobre su forma correcta de expresión y mejore su lenguaje. Fuente: Catalina Jaramillo Aguilar. Docente. Facultad de Comunicación, Universidad de Medellín. Correo electrónico: cjaramillo@udem.edu.co

LA Youth » Immigrant dreams I always knew my parents had come here from Mexico illegally but I didn’t know any of the details. I was busy hanging out with my family and friends, going to school or longing to go to a show for the rockabilly band the Horrorpops. I would cry when I saw the news reports about people drowning in the Rio Grande or dying in the desert while trying to cross the border, but then I would go back to my life. As I heard about the protests and the school walkouts over HR 4437, the bill that would make it a felony to be undocumented, I became curious about how and why my parents had come here. When I was a child, my dad and grandma told me stories about Mexico so I would appreciate my home. But I hardly knew anything about my dad’s childhood. One afternoon, as I relaxed on the bench on our front porch, my dad sat next to me. Growing up in Puebla, Mexico, my dad had a childhood like any other kid. Everyone knew each other. The lure of Los Angeles The coyote told them to follow him.

Virtual Professional Learning Networks - The Inspired Classroom  If you live in an urban area, near a university, or work in a large school district you may have access to lunchtime brownbag meetings and idea exchanges. Professional educators with a common interest sit down and share ideas and resources with each other. I am often envious of English teachers who have fellow faculty members, who are teaching the exact same content, to share thoughts with. I have found that by creating an online Professional Learning Network (PLN) I am still able to discuss new ideas, share resources, and promote current uses with individuals interested in information resources and educational technology. Your next step is to set up a Google Reader (or other online aggregator service) account and find twenty educational blogs to follow. We have also been thinking about guiding students in the creation of their own PLNs.

guernica Analyse de GUERNICA GUERNICA a été réalisé par Picasso en 1937. Celui-ci s'est inspiré du bombardement de la petite ville basque de GUERNICA, le 26 avril 1937, par l'aviation allemande au service de Franco. Guernica était une commande du gouvernement républicain espagnol pour le pavillon à l'Exposition Universelle de Paris de juillet 1937. Picasso, à travers ce tableau, symbolise l'horreur des conflits humains. "La peinture n'est pas faite pour décorer les appartements; c’est une arme offensive et défensive contre l’ennemi", c'est ce que déclara Picasso à propos de Guernica. Les Caractéristiques : Guernica est une huile sur toile mesurant 7 m 52 de long sur 3 m 51 de largeur. Analyse des différents symboles du tableau : Tout d'abord, au centre du tableau, la lampe. Le taureau à gauche est l'incarnation de la brutalité, de l'obscurité dans la corrida. Le cheval, quant à lui, incarne la victime innocente de cette corrida. La colombe symbolise la paix. Le soldat, on le voit l'épée brisée.

Muletillas - ejemplos Historias orales: beginners First jokes for children learning Spanish » Spanish Playground I have to admit that a lot of the Spanish jokes my children told when they were little, or English jokes for that matter, did not make me laugh. They were usually basic word play or just silly. Of course, even when I didn’t think they were very funny, the kids thought they were hilarious. There are lots of simple Spanish jokes that children can understand. Some depend on the double meaning of a word. Children learn language from listening, so they do not have to tell Spanish jokes themselves to learn from them. To make the most of Spanish jokes with language learners: -Tell your child that you are going to tell a joke. When children do tell jokes, they repeat them from memory, much like songs or poems. The vocabulary in jokes varies a lot, so your child may understand some perfectly and others not at all. Here are a few simple jokes that many Spanish language learners understand: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. (A patient says to the doctor: Doctor, if I touch my ear, it hurts.

How To Use Blogs In the Classroom - eLearning Industry With the inception of Common Core standards and The No Child Left Behind Act, all educators require teaching literacy across the curriculum. Getting kids to write, especially the weaker writers, can be a challenge in itself but getting kids to write about math can be even more challenging – unless you use blogging as your literacy tactic. Blog writing is informal, unlike academic writing, which may be intimidating to some, if not all, of your students. Blog writing takes the pressure off of writing and gives your students a voice in a safe environment, even if you or your students stepping out of your comfort zone. What is a Blog? Blog is short for web log. Blogs are written on all kinds of topics from A to Z. How can Teachers and Students use Blogs? This YouTube video from Palm Breeze Cafe gives an overview of a blog’s place in the educational process. In order to watch this video you need to have advertising cookies enabled. The Top 3 Blogging Platforms For Teachers Homebase

Spanish Authentic Resources - home Finally...My Home Away From Home! I am so happy to finally share pictures of my classroom. I absolutely love the way it turned out. I was going for a circus theme, but it really turned out to be a whimsical wonderland...TONS of color, flags and bright lights. So...Welcome to my 2011-2012 Classroom! Our school uses foam insulation boards as bulletin boards outside of our classrooms. My board is covered in fabric, and I hot glued real crayons on top as a border, and hung it from the ceiling with cute ribbon. For the past several years I have used Poco and Pop's Birthday Banner (which is awesome), but when I saw this on Pinterest, I knew I had to give it a try. So if you haven't heard of QR codes...google it! Photos from various places in my classroom! My new "circus themed" word wall. My smartboard, with one of my favorite pinterest ideas. We are a bucket filling classroom! Jail Words - Found the idea on a first grade blog and the kids love the idea of sending words to jail.

Great games to learn vocabulary in Spanish by leonora9700 Oct 27

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