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Engage your audience with verified social content and insights.

Engage your audience with verified social content and insights.
Loaded: 0% Progress: 0% Newswire A new kind of newswire, powered by Storyful's "human algorithm". Verified news videos, alerts and context served into a powerful web dashboard and backed up by editorial services from the world’s leading digital news gathering team. Find out more about Newswire

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Why did Hillary Clinton lose? Sign Up for Our free email newsletters Donald Trump's victory over Hillary Clinton will probably be considered the second-greatest upset in American presidential politics, after Harry Truman's come-from-behind victory in 1948. Is Twitter Wrong? No. It’s actually a picture from 2011, of a thunderstorm over Manhattan during a tornado alert (which turned out to be uneventful in the end, although the US and other countries were struck with an unusually high number of tornados that year). The original source appears to be this Wall Street Journal article, and the picture was taken through a tinted window by a finance professional called Charles Menjivar (from his workplace, most likely - his current employers are situated pretty much where this picture looks to be taken from).

Knight Prototype Fund announces funding for 18 new projects Eighteen projects aimed at improving journalism or media are each receiving $35,000 in seed funding from Knight Foundation as part of the latest round of funding from the Knight Prototype Fund, the foundation just announced. (Disclosure: Knight also funds Nieman Lab, though not through the Prototype Fund.) Many of the more journalistically focused projects in this round of funding involve audience engagement and how to better solicit and accept user-generated content. Public Radio International is building a system to allow readers to respond to news articles by integrating prompts into the body of stories.

Circa’s New iOS App Will Change The Way You Consume News The way that we consume information on the Internet has changed dramatically over the years. The main reason is because there is simply more content available to us than we could ever consume during our time on Earth. Back in the day, our only options for news were newspapers and then eventually the local TV or radio station telling us what’s happening in our immediate area.

Content Curation Tools from Mass Relevance 74 Flares Twitter 37 Facebook 5 StumbleUpon 0 Google+ 8 LinkedIn 5 inShare5 Buffer 5 Reddit 0 Pin It Share 14 14 Email -- Email to a friend 74 Flares × Some of you may be asking what content curation is. There’s a ridiculous volume of content being published on the web via Twitter, Facebook, blogs, news, YouTube and other mediums. Chances are that some of that content is valuable to your audience – but it requires some analysis, filtering and presentation in a manner that is helpful. The Personal News Cycle: How Americans choose to get news Published This research was conducted by the Media Insight Project — an initiative of the American Press Institute and the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research Introduction Contrary to the conventional wisdom about media consumption dividing along generational or political lines, a new survey finds that the nature of the news itself — the topic and speed of the story — largely determines where people go to learn about events and the path they take to get there.

S9 Citizen Video for Journalists: Verification Citizen video is becoming a powerful new reporting tool. But faked footage threatens to break the trust that’s so critical to newsrooms and audiences. Storyful reporter Della Kilroy demystifies the verification process, sharing important lessons for reporters and human rights researchers alike. By Della Kilroy, Storyful Journalist Even three years ago, many news organizations were nervous about broadcasting YouTube content because of concerns about whether it could be trusted, worries that viewers would be turned off by shaky cell phone footage, and confusion about whether they had permission to use such content. But user generated content has now become a staple of television broadcasts, as audiences seek more authentic footage, and journalists become more sophisticated about verifying content and seek permission for use.

On the hunt for attention, media outlets gamify the news And now, for their next reader-engagement trick, publishers are taking a few lessons from your PlayStation. The world of video games is coming to the news. While publishers are used to telling stories in text and, recently, in video, some are looking to add a dose of interactivity to their news in an effort to attract more readers and keep them around longer. Last week, Al Jazeera launched “Pirate Fishing,” an online game that puts players in the role of a journalist as he investigates an illegal fishing trade. Players, who start as “junior researchers” get points by watching videos and filing clips in their notebooks, helping them earn “senior reporter” positions and ” specialist badges.” The game was based of an Al Jazeera video series originally published in 2012.

How media companies can think more like startups One of the central themes of the RoadMap conference we just finished doing in San Francisco earlier this week was the importance of design, and how companies both big and small need to think about design in an age of ubiquitous connectivity — and not just design in the sense of how something looks or feels, but how it works and the relationship users have with it. That might not seem like something that has immediate or obvious implications for media companies, but I think plenty of traditional players in the industry could learn a lot from the lessons that founders like David Karp of Tumblr and Evan Williams of Medium provided at RoadMap. Create something you want or need

A Curator's Tools and To-Do List Going to a museum is an enhanced content-viewing experience; some of the work it takes to understand and appreciate art has already been done for you. That's the same confidence you feel when going to a good wine shop or bookstore. You know someone has reflected thoughtfully on the contents of those aisles, selected the best wines and books in a given category and done the research for you. And if you have questions, you can talk to someone who can answer them. That's the magic of the curator: Putting in the work to find the content that matters and assembling objects, ideas, and media into an experience that is meaningful to the consumer. And it's not just art, wine, and books that need a good curator—information does as well. How technology disrupted One Monday morning last September, Britain woke to a depraved news story. The prime minister, David Cameron, had committed an “obscene act with a dead pig’s head”, according to the Daily Mail. “A distinguished Oxford contemporary claims Cameron once took part in an outrageous initiation ceremony at a Piers Gaveston event, involving a dead pig,” the paper reported. Piers Gaveston is the name of a riotous Oxford university dining society; the authors of the story claimed their source was an MP, who said he had seen photographic evidence: “His extraordinary suggestion is that the future PM inserted a private part of his anatomy into the animal.” The story, extracted from a new biography of Cameron, sparked an immediate furore.

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