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People Can Learn New Skills While They Dream, Scientists Say

People Can Learn New Skills While They Dream, Scientists Say
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The Best of Dream Studies 2011 Here’s hoping that your final days of 2011 are relaxing! As I look back what happened this year, I’m happy to report that 2011 has been a year of growth for me. Highlights: I started off the year by lecturing at Stanford University on the topic of sleep paralysis, published my first peer-reviewed article in March, and am now wrapping up the year with a new book launch on lucid dreaming. Other highlights include three sleep related articles of mine that went viral on Business Insider and an article about wolf dreams that was republished on Care2, one of the biggest healthy living sites on the web. 2011 was a big year for radio work too. I was interviewed 5 times via blog radio: all are still available to listen online and can be found in my Whereabouts page. As for DreamStudies.org, you may be interested to learn that: The top trafficked articles written this year were: And some personal favorite posts of 2011 that you may have missed: What’s ahead for 2012? Happy New Year!

Hypnagogia and Hypnopompia | The Dream Studies Portal Hypnagogia is the imagery, sounds and strange bodily feelings that are felt at “sleep onset.” This is a simplification though, as researchers have noted hypnagogic imagery in the lab at periods of quiet wakefulness as well as stage 1 sleep. Others have correlated hypnagogia with pre-sleep alpha waves and also REM intrusion into sleep onset. The truth is that the wake-sleep transition is still not understood. And neither are its trippy visuals. whispy lights, multi-dimentional geometric objects, or a sudden image like a stranger’s face Few people remember hypnagogic imagery. Strange noises, voices and rushing sounds are typical, as well as weird mechanistic sounds like beeps and boops. Some hear music — I personally have had lucid hypnagogic orchestras from time to time, with the ability to listen passively or focus on a particular instrument to induce a solo. Entoptica - by Ryan Hurd, 2005, acrylic: inspired by my hypnagogic imagery Some people are haunted by the hypnagogic imagery.

10 Benefits of Rising Early, and How to Do It | zen habits “Early to bed and early to rise makes a man healthy, wealthy and wise” – Ben Franklin, famously “Put no trust in the benefits to accrue from early rising, as set forth by the infatuated Franklin …” – Mark Twain By Leo Babauta Recently, reader Rob asked me about my habit of waking at 4:30 a.m. each day, and asked me to write about the health benefits of rising early, which I thought was an excellent question. However, there are a ton of other great benefits. Now, let me first say that if you are a night owl, and that works for you, I think that’s great. Greet the day. How to Become an Early Riser Don’t make drastic changes. CambridgeDeclarationOnConsciousness.pdf (application/pdf Object)

Lucid Dreaming Tips - How to Lucid Dream - Tips for Lucid Dreaming / Lucid Dreams The Six Basic Steps There are many techniques and methods that you can use for inducing lucid dreams, but there is an underlying process behind most, if not all of them. I have broken this underlying process down into six basic steps to serve as a foundation for your lucid dream training. Once you absorb these steps and start following them, it is only a matter of time before you have your first lucid dream. In case you are wondering how long it will take for you to have your first one, just follow through with the steps and have faith that you will have one. 1) Doing the Mental Prep-Work 2) Increasing dream recall 3) Keeping a dream journal 4) Becoming familiar with your Dreams 5) Adding Awareness to your Waking Consciousness 6) Linking your Awareness to your Dreams Step One) Doing the Mental Prep-Work This step involves setting up the right mental foundation and building a mental framework that will maximize your success. Here are four key questions that you need to ask yourself. 1.) 2.) 3.)

Lucid daydreaming | Snoozon.com Create account Sign in Create account We're working around the clock to give life to our upcoming online lucid dream journal. Please be patient and be the first to know about our progress, sneak previews and release date by subscribing to our free mailing list below. * Your email address will only be used for sending you updates on Snoozon. Sign in below Subscribe to our blog for the latest News, reviews and research studies We'll keep you updated on the latest lucid dreaming books, gadgets, research studies, and more. Share your thoughts! About Us Snoozon provides credible lucid dream training and dedicated online tools to support the science and worldwide practice of lucid dreaming. Contact us Rigelstraat 48 7522 HK Enschede Netherlands contact@snoozon.com +31 6 4675 7260 Terms and Conditions Privacy Policy Follow Us Be the first to know about our backstage developments, product discounts and upcoming events by keeping in touch.

Making a dream date - Dream Gates "At the Foothills of Mt Helen". B.K.Connelly, 1981 You’re separated from your sweetheart and you’d like to have some good private time together. Can you do that? Absolutely. If you are embarking on shared dreaming as home entertainment, you get to choose your category. I know what I am talking about. Want to try this? But shared dreaming doesn’t require you to start out from the same place, or even on the same continent. To keep this simple, let’s assume you have a friend who is not physically present, with whom you’d like to share a dream adventure. 1. You might simply agree to try to meet in your dreams on (say) Wednesday night. 2. If you’re new to this kind of thing, it’s probably best to start out with a place in the physical world that one or both of you know. 3. The idea of simply hanging out with your partner in a delightful locale – and not having to pay for the plane ticket or the five-star hotel suite – may be juicy enough. 4. 5. 6.

sleepyti.me bedtime calculator Instant Expert 31: The human brain Cookies on the New Scientist website close Our website uses cookies, which are small text files that are widely used in order to make websites work more effectively. Find out about our cookies and how to change them Log in Your login is case sensitive I have forgotten my password close My New Scientist Look for Science Jobs Instant Expert 31: The human brain (Image: Wellcome Trust Centre for Neuroimaging)It took thousands of years, but our understanding of how the brain works has brought us to the brink of enlightenment. Milestones of neuroscience We now have a detailed understanding of the brain's building block – the neuron. More than one way to map a mind Injuries were once the key to learning how the brain worked, but advanced imaging techniques are now giving us detailed maps of where our skills ariseRead more From tiny neurons to expansive minds How does the brain generate a conscious mind? Looking over the neuroscience horizon Download a paper brain to build yourself REVIEW: 19:00 16 April 2014

The Best Lucid Dreaming Techniques Movies like Inception and Avatar have made lucid dreaming a household word. The buzz around the idea that we can wake up in our dreams ripples outwards, rocking our collective boat as more us realize that the world as we know it is malleable and magical. But lucid dreaming can be difficult to learn. What I suggest is simple, but not necessarily easy. While dreams can open us up to new possibilities, most of the time our interests, preoccupations and cognitive abilities in dreams mirror the same constructs that we nurture in waking life. Towards Lucid Living Practice gratitude. Breathe. Feel your dreambody. See if you can give a name to this feeling: heart-achiness, burning belly, or fluttery chest. Lucidity is in the Mind and the Body Words confine, awareness defines This simple exercise, drawn from the work of psychologists Arnold Mindell and Eugene Genlin, puts us in direct contact with the dreambody. But in our dreams, the dreambody is front and center. The Path Up is Down

Meditation May Protect Your Brain | Miller-McCune Online For thousands of years, Buddhist meditators have claimed that the simple act of sitting down and following their breath while letting go of intrusive thoughts can free one from the entanglements of neurotic suffering. Now, scientists are using cutting-edge scanning technology to watch the meditating mind at work. They are finding that regular meditation has a measurable effect on a variety of brain structures related to attention — an example of what is known as neuroplasticity, where the brain physically changes in response to an intentional exercise. A team of Emory University scientists reported in early September that experienced Zen meditators were much better than control subjects at dropping extraneous thoughts and returning to the breath. The same researchers reported last year that longtime meditators don’t lose gray matter in their brains with age the way most people do, suggesting that meditation may have a neuro-protective effect. Where does all this lead?

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