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STREET ART

STREET ART

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uuGaqLT-gO4

20 awesome examples of street art If you still need a proof that art can be found anywhere, those awesome examples of great street art should convince you. Steve Kaufman Dollar Bills screenprint (PP). Place bid Review and confirm your bid Bid confirmation d

Immaterials: Light painting WiFi The city is filled with an invisible landscape of networks that is becoming an interwoven part of daily life. WiFi networks and increasingly sophisticated mobile phones are starting to influence how urban environments are experienced and understood. We want to explore and reveal what the immaterial terrain of WiFi looks like and how it relates to the city. The Convertible “Infinity” Dress: How it almost defeated me, and what you need to make one I made this thing. It’s pretty cool. It’s a convertible dress that’s basically a circle and two straps, so it’s really easy, inexpensive, and crazy versatile. It’s been around forever and everyone seems to love it (in fact, part of the reason I’m posting this is to answer some questions for people I’ve run into), and I can hardly believe how close I came to not making it at all. I first found the instructions at a blog called rostitchery, and then I came across a second set at Cut Out + Keep.

Acrylic pixels by Anthony Michaels Just found on Flickr (thanks to Simmi) and can’t find much info about him, sorry. I really enjoy his colorful pixel retro style acrylic paintings, bringing strong messages put down like old Nintendo videogames covers. Before I Die What matters most to you Interactive public art project that invites people to share their personal aspirations in public. After losing someone she loved and falling into depression, Chang created this experiment on an abandoned house in her neighborhood to create an anonymous place to help restore perspective and share intimately with her neighbors. The project gained global attention and thanks to passionate people around the world, over 1000 Before I Die walls have now been created in over 70 countries, including Kazakhstan, Iraq, Haiti, China, Ukraine, Portugal, Japan, Denmark, Argentina, and South Africa. The walls are an honest mess of the longing, pain, joy, insecurity, gratitude, fear, and wonder you find in every community, and they reimagine public spaces that nurture honesty, vulnerability, trust and understanding. The Before I Die book is a celebration of these walls and the stories behind them.

Steve Kaufman Steven Alan Kaufman (also known as Steve Kaufman, December 29, 1960 – February 12, 2010) was an American pop artist,[1] fine artist, sculptor, stained glass artist, filmmaker, photographer and humanitarian. His entry into the world of serious pop art began in his teens when he became an assistant to Andy Warhol at The Factory studio. Nicknamed "SAK" by Warhol, Kaufman eventually executed such pieces as a 144-foot long canvas which later toured the country. Early life[edit] Steve Kaufman was born in 1960 in the The Bronx, New York, the middle child, surrounded by an extended family, many of whom were painters and sculptors that were a significant influence on him and his views on art. His father died when he was four years old.

'Tox' graffiti artist convicted of criminal damage To some he is an urban icon, a street artist dedicated to bombing his tag on more, and riskier, places than any other in the UK. But Daniel Halpin – or Tox, "king of taggers" and scourge of London Underground's cleaning force – faces the possibility of prison walls as his only canvas after a jury decided his art was vandalism and convicted him of criminal damage. The 26-year-old, from Camden, north London, whose masked image and story of anarchism has featured on television documentaries and in magazines, was found guilty of a string of graffiti attacks across England after prosecutor Hugo Lodge told a jury: "He is no Banksy.

DIY Solar Lamp: Make Your Own Eco-Friendly Sun Jars The principle is simple and seductively clever: solar lights that store energy during the day and release light at night. These can be purchased ready-made in a variety of colors (yellow, blue and red) but they can also be built at home. A simple, less-technical approach involves buying a conventional solar-powered yard lamp and then essentially harvesting it for key pieces to put in a jar. This is simply a way of taking an existing solar lamp design and appropriating its parts to make something more attractive for display around a house or home. A more electronically-savvy individual can take the more complex route and built a solar lamp from the ground up using small solar panels – though the aesthetic result may not be as impressive.

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