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Calais Viewer

The Calais initiative is about enabling semantic applications by providing a metadata generation web service, sample applications using that service to jumpstart development efforts, and support for developers. The Calais Web Service The Calais web service automatically attaches rich semantic metadata to the content you submit. Using natural language processing, machine learning and other methods, Calais categorizes and links your document with entities (people, places, organizations, etc.), facts (person "x" works for company "y"), and events (person "z" was appointed chairman of company "y" on date "x"). * The Calais Viewer works with Firefox and Internet Explorer - other browsers may yield unpredictable results

http://viewer.opencalais.com/

Related:  Nouvelles écritures

Metalogue: Search Results I'm at the VALA2010 conference in Melbourne, a library technology conference comparable in some ways to the LITA national conferences in the U.S. VALA opened yesterday and will continue through Thursday (Melbourne's Thursday that is). Lots of interesting stuff being discussed here. Named-entity recognition Named-entity recognition (NER) (also known as entity identification, entity chunking and entity extraction) is a subtask of information extraction that seeks to locate and classify elements in text into pre-defined categories such as the names of persons, organizations, locations, expressions of times, quantities, monetary values, percentages, etc. Most research on NER systems has been structured as taking an unannotated block of text, such as this one: Jim bought 300 shares of Acme Corp. in 2006. And producing an annotated block of text that highlights the names of entities: [Jim]Person bought 300 shares of [Acme Corp.]Organization in [2006]Time. In this example, a person name consisting of one token, a two-token company name and a temporal expression have been detected and classified.

Web 3.0 A short story about the Semantic Web. Some Internet experts believe the next generation of the Web - Web 3.0 - will make tasks like your search for movies and food faster and easier. Instead of multiple searches, you might type a complex sentence or two in your Web 3.0 browser, and the Web will do the rest. For example, you could type "I want to see a funny movie and then eat at a good Mexican restaurant. What are my options?"

10086-1 Botanical model, deadly nightshade (Atropa belladonna), Object statement Botanical model, deadly nightshade (Atropa belladonna), made by Auzoux, Paris, France, 1865-1885 In the second half of the nineteenth century interest in the anatomical structure of the animal and vegetable world increased markedly.

LingPipe Home How Can We Help You? Get the latest version: Free and Paid Licenses/DownloadsLearn how to use LingPipe: Tutorials Get expert help using LingPipe: Services Join us on Facebook What is LingPipe? LingPipe is tool kit for processing text using computational linguistics. LingPipe is used to do tasks like: Writing Augmented Reality Applications using JSARToolKit This article discusses APIs that are not yet fully standardized and still in flux. Be cautious when using experimental APIs in your own projects. Introduction

Calais 4.0 Released: Linked Data Meets the Commercial Web Thomson Reuters is today launching the latest version of its Calais web service and open API, Calais 4.0. Calais is a toolkit of products that enables publishers to incorporate semantic functionality within their properties - enabling them to categorize content as people, places, companies, facts, events, and more. Calais 4.0 is perhaps the most significant version since the launch of Calais one year ago, because it enables publishers to connect to the Linked Data web standard that Sir Tim-Berners Lee and others in the Semantic Web community have been promoting over the past few years. Up till now, we have yet to see much commercial activity in Linked Data - developments have been largely confined to the academic and scientific communities. So we think Calais 4.0 represents an important move forward in the commercial Semantic Web - and we expect to see some big media companies using it before long. What's New in 4.0

AutoMap: Project Overview | People | Sponsors | Publications | Hardware Requirements | Software | Training & Sample Data AutoMap is a text mining tool developed by CASOS at Carnegie Mellon. Input: one or more unstructured texts. Output: DyNetML files and CS files. Thoughts on Google Plus: The Magic Isn’t Social, It’s Semantic It’s been said that I’ve called Google Plus “one of the subtlest and most user-friendly ontology development systems we’ve ever seen.” I did, and you can listen for yourselves on the Semantic Link podcast. Why did I do so? Well, G+ follows some of the basic principles of linked data: it uses persistent HTTP URIs for people, Sparks (concepts) and posts.

Metadata Metadata is "data about data".[1] There are two "metadata types;" structural metadata, about the design and specification of data structures or "data about the containers of data"; and descriptive metadata about individual instances of application data or the data content. The main purpose of metadata is to facilitate in the discovery of relevant information, more often classified as resource discovery. Metadata also helps organize electronic resources, provide digital identification, and helps support archiving and preservation of the resource. Metadata assists in resource discovery by "allowing resources to be found by relevant criteria, identifying resources, bringing similar resources together, distinguishing dissimilar resources, and giving location information." [2]

Beyond Social: Read/Write in The Era of Internet of Things This blog was founded in 2003 on the philosophy of a read/write Web - a Web in which people can create content as easily as they consume it. This trend eventually came to be known as Web 2.0 - although others preferred Social Web - and was popularized by activities like blogging and social networking. It would be easy to say that the 'social' element is still the primary part of today's Web, since the popular products of this era enable you to say what's on your mind (Facebook), what's happening (Twitter), or where you are (Foursquare). Flat design Definition and purpose[edit] Flat design refers to a style of interface design which removes any stylistic choices that give the illusion of three-dimensions (such as drop shadows, gradients, textures, or other tools that add depth)[1] and is focused on a minimalist use of simple elements, typography and flat colors.[2] Designers may prefer flat design because it allows interface designs to be more streamlined and efficient. It is easier to quickly convey information while still looking visually appealing and approachable.[3] Additionally, it makes it easier to design an interface that is responsive to changes in browser size across different devices. With minimal design elements, websites are able to load faster and resize easily, and still look sharp on high-definition screens.[1] As a design approach, it is often contrasted to skeuomorphism [4] and rich design.[1] In the 1980s, computer-based user interfaces were a foreign concept to most users. History of use[edit]

3.0 Semantic Web The Semantic Web is a collaborative movement led by international standards body the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C).[1] The standard promotes common data formats on the World Wide Web. By encouraging the inclusion of semantic content in web pages, the Semantic Web aims at converting the current web, dominated by unstructured and semi-structured documents into a "web of data". The Semantic Web stack builds on the W3C's Resource Description Framework (RDF).[2] Forecast 2020: Web 3.0+ and Collective Intelligence « simple processes “We know what we are, but we know not what we may become” – Shakespeare The ancient Chinese curse or saying — “May you live in interesting times.” — is upon us. We are in the midst of a new revolution fueled by advancements in the Internet and technology. Currently, there is an abundance of information and the size of social interaction has reached a colossal scale. Within a span of just one generation, the availability of information and our access to them has changed dramatically from scarcity to surplus. What humans will do or try to do with such powerful surplus of information will be the main topic of this article.

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