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KONY 2012

KONY 2012

http://vimeo.com/37119711

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The Road to Hell Is Paved with Viral Videos - By David Rieff Click here to see photos of the evolution of the LRA. When and how so many Americans, young people in particular, were convinced, or convinced themselves, that awareness offers the key to righting wrongs wherever in the world they may be is hard to pinpoint. But whatever else it does and fails to do, Kony 2012, the 30-minute video produced by a previously obscure California- and Uganda-based charity called Invisible Children that seeks to "make Joseph Kony famous in 2012" so that this homicidal bandit leader of the Lord's Resistance Army (LRA) in central Africa will be hunted down and turned over to the International Criminal Court, illustrates just how deeply engrained in American culture this assumption has now become. As a film, as history, and as policy analysis, there is little to be said for Kony 2012 except that its star and narrator, Jason Russell, the head of Invisible Children, and his colleagues seem to have their hearts in the right place. Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Criticism over KONY 2012 video continues as Ugandan women wish to forget the past Any views expressed in this article are those of the author and not of Thomson Reuters Foundation. Women News Network (WNN) San Diego, CALIFORNIA: Amid harsh criticism stating that the makers of the viral video sensation about Joseph Kony and the child soldiers of Uganda, called ‘KONY 2012,’ is now considered the most viewed video ever. It has received attention from such diverse groups as NASDAQ, DailyKos, Al Jazeera TV, USA Today, Forbes and Doctors Without Borders.

Guest post: Joseph Kony is not in Uganda (and other complicated things) Click here to see photos of the evolution of the LRA. Thanks to an incredibly effective social media effort, #StopKony is trending on Twitter today. The campaign coincides with a new awareness-raising documentary by the group Invisible Children. Former FP intern Michael Wilkerson, now a freelance journalist and grad student at Oxford -- who has lived and reported from Uganda -- contributed this guest post on the campaign. -JK By Michael Wilkerson:

The Soft Bigotry of Kony 2012 - Max Fisher - International The viral video campaign reinforces a dangerous, centuries-old idea that Africans are helpless and that idealistic Westerners must save them. Staff from Invisible Children direct Africans in a still from their Kony 2012 video / YouTube The backlash against Kony 2012, a super-popular social media campaign to raise awareness about deranged warlord Joseph Kony and his Lord's Resistance Army, has mostly focused on two things. First, the group behind it, Invisible Children, has a poor track record and shady finances; and, second, the campaign's uninformed and almost infantilizing over-simplifications are probably going to do very little beyond raise lots of money and publicity for Invisible Children. But campaigns like this one, and this one especially, can end up doing more harm than good.

The Visual Thinking Revolution is Here! We are in the midst of a “Visual Thinking Revolution” and leaders in all types of organizations are embracing visual thinking as a literacy of the future. Source: MBA Career Service Professionals (click to enlarge) This revolution’s “tipping point” came earlier this year at the International Forum for Visual Practitioners annual conference, which drew 100 visual practitioners from across the globe. The panel I moderated with Business Models Inc.

Jeremy Konyndyk: Kony 2012 A number of pundits have rushed to cast the firestorm around the Kony 2012 video as pointless squabbling, with Nick Kristof the latest to chime in. After all, they argue, how could anyone question an effort to raise awareness about the damage done by the warlord Joseph Kony and his militia, the Lord's Resistance Army? This controversy should not be so casually dismissed. Students react to Kony 2012 video The KONY 2012 campaign swept Facebook pages across the country in the past few weeks and timelines of many University students featured reposts of the video that went viral in one day. The night it was released, University freshman Jamie Tyberg created a Facebook group for the “Make Kony Famous” event that the video called for in cities across the country on April 20. Invisible Children co-founder and director of the documentary Jason Russell implored viewers to “cover the night” with posters and images of Joseph Kony, the leader of the Lord’s Resistance Army made up largely of child soldiers and that terrorized northern Uganda through 2007.

The Road to Hell Is Paved with Viral Videos - By David Rieff Click here to see photos of the evolution of the LRA. When and how so many Americans, young people in particular, were convinced, or convinced themselves, that awareness offers the key to righting wrongs wherever in the world they may be is hard to pinpoint. But whatever else it does and fails to do, Kony 2012, the 30-minute video produced by a previously obscure California- and Uganda-based charity called Invisible Children that seeks to "make Joseph Kony famous in 2012" so that this homicidal bandit leader of the Lord's Resistance Army (LRA) in central Africa will be hunted down and turned over to the International Criminal Court, illustrates just how deeply engrained in American culture this assumption has now become. As a film, as history, and as policy analysis, there is little to be said for Kony 2012 except that its star and narrator, Jason Russell, the head of Invisible Children, and his colleagues seem to have their hearts in the right place. Spencer Platt/Getty Images

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