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Explorations of the Mind: Intuition

Explorations of the Mind: Intuition
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The Brain Story | Documentary Heaven | Watch Free Documentaries Online Why do we think and feel as we do? For years man has sought to understand the workings of the mind. Now, with advances in modern-day technology and developments in neuroscience, a whole new world of brain research is opening up. Understanding our minds is becoming a reality. Guided by top neuroscientist Susan Greenfield, Brain Story attempts to answer the question “What is my mind and who am I?” We talk to philosophers, clinicians, neurosurgeons and their patients to discover quite what a finely balanced and complex machine the brain is. All in the Mind. In the Heat of the Moment. The Mind’s Eye. First Among Equals. Growing the Mind. The Final Mystery.

Brain Study | Learning about the brain, body and how it all connects The Seven Habits of Highly Effective People The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People, first published in 1989, is a business and self-help book written by Stephen R. Covey.[1] Covey presents an approach to being effective in attaining goals by aligning oneself to what he calls "true north" principles of a character ethic that he presents as universal and timeless. The 7 Habits[edit] The book first introduces the concept of paradigm shift and helps the reader understand that different perspectives exist, i.e. that two people can see the same thing and yet differ with each other. On this premise, it introduces the seven habits in a proper order. Each chapter is dedicated to one of the habits, which are represented by the following imperatives: Independence[edit] The First Three Habits surround moving from dependence to independence (i.e., self-mastery): 1 - Be Proactive roles and relationships in life. 2 - Begin with the End in Mind envision what you want in the future so that you know concretely what to make a reality. 4 - Think Win-Win

Hermetics.org Brain, Mind, and Altered States of Consciousness The conspiracy to reduce consciousness to intellectual awareness of the physical world has been in evidence for at least five thousand years. Over the centuries the mental and psychic powers that only mystics and seers now possess have been filtered out of most people. So we now assume that our narrow, tightly-bound consciousness is normal and natural. "Ordinary consciousness" is "normal" only in the strict sense of "statistically most frequent," not inherently "good" or "natural" as the term is sometimes misconstrued to mean. When contrasted with supernormal consciousness experienced by certain people in specific instances, our current rigid, intellect-based awareness is highly abnormal and unnatural. Reports of Supernormal Consciousness "The boundary between my physical self and my surroundings seemed to dissolve and my feeling of separation vanished. . . . The Conspiracy to Debase Human Consciousness The Human Brain and Mind Brain Stimulation and Neurofeedback

Where is The Mind?: Science gets puzzled and almost admits a non-local mentalscape. This will be the last "home-produced" blog entry for a while [save the short "Everyday Spirituality" which will follow it as a sign-off] . West Virginia beckons tomorrow morning and off I will go to whatever that entails. As I said in one of the commentary responses the other day, I hope that reading two journal runs "cover-to-cover" will bring up a few thoughts worth sharing. This day's entry was inspired by two articles bumped into coincidentally which had scientists puzzling about a holographic universe and a non-local mind. Those scientists would cringe to see how I've taken their sign-posts-on-the-path, but that is their hang-up, not mine The first of these articles [both from the New Scientist] was "Where in the World is the Mind?" That brings in the second serendipitous article. It reminded me then, also, of a moment when I was able to spend a [too short] time with David Bohm, the famous theoretical physicist.

Intuitionism in the Philosophy of Mathematics First published Thu Sep 4, 2008; substantive revision Wed Aug 14, 2013 Intuitionism is a philosophy of mathematics that was introduced by the Dutch mathematician L.E.J. Brouwer (1881–1966). Intuitionism is based on the idea that mathematics is a creation of the mind. The truth of a mathematical statement can only be conceived via a mental construction that proves it to be true, and the communication between mathematicians only serves as a means to create the same mental process in different minds. This view on mathematics has far reaching implications for the daily practice of mathematics, one of its consequences being that the principle of the excluded middle, (A ∨ ¬A), is no longer valid. Besides the rejection of the principle of the excluded middle, intuitionism strongly deviates from classical mathematics in the conception of the continuum, which in the former setting has the property that all total functions on it are continuous. 1. 2. 2.1 The two acts of intuitionism 3.

All about flow Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi, author of “Flow: The Psychology of Optimal Experience,” describes flow as “being completely involved in an activity for its own sake. The ego falls away. Time flies. Every action, movement, and thought follows inevitably from the previous one, like playing jazz. Your whole being is involved, and you’re using your skills to the utmost.” Csikszentmihalyi’s ideas on flow stemmed from his attempt to discover a path to happiness. “Flow” & Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi discusses what it feels like to be in flow: Completely involved, focused, concentrating – with this either due to innate curiosity or as the result of training. Clear goals (expectations and rules are discernable). Group environment matters too. Creative spatial arrangements: Chairs, pin walls, charts, however no tables, therefore primarily work in standing and moving. Enemies of flow include fearing what other people think… ...and mundane daily routines.

166 Documentaries To Expand Your Consciousness By: Higher Perspective Here is a list of over 100 documentaries you can watch for free online. They are about Science, Consciousness, ETs, you name it. It’s a smorgasbord of fascinating subjects to learn about. If you find a dead link please let us know and we will find another to replace it. Enjoy! 1. Lucid Dreaming Techniques: A Guide To Lucid Dream Induction Here are my top lucid dreaming techniques for beginners. They range from simple memory exercises (like Reality Checks and Mnemonic Induction of Lucid Dreams) to specialized meditation (like Wake Induced Lucid Dreams). Lucid Dreaming Tutorials For step-by-step tutorials and audio tools for lucid dream induction and exploration, check out my Lucid Dreaming Fast Track study program for beginners and beyond. 52 Ways to Have Lucid Dreams A complete list of 52 ways to have lucid dreams - based on visualization, memory, supplements, sleep cycles and more methods than you can shake a stick at. How to Have Lucid Dreams A summary of my favorite lucid dreaming techniques, from improving dream recall, to programming your dreams, to meditation and self-hypnosis. How to Remember Your Dreams To lucid dream, you must first remember your dreams. Keeping a Dream Journal How to Perform Reality Checks How to Improve Your Self Awareness Lucid Dreams and Prospective Memory Dream Induced Lucid Dreams (DILDs)

Neurotheology: This Is Your Brain On Religion Principles of NeurotheologyBy Andrew B. NewbergPaperback, 284 pagesAshgateList price: $29.95 "Neurotheology" is a unique field of scholarship and investigation that seeks to understand the relationship specifically between the brain and theology, and more broadly between the mind and religion. As a topic, neurotheology has garnered substantial attention in the academic and lay communities in recent years. Several books have been written addressing the relationship between the brain and religious experience and numerous scholarly articles have been published on the topic. The scientific and religious communities have been very interested in obtaining more information regarding neurotheology, how to approach this topic, and whether science and religion can be integrated in some manner that preserves, and perhaps enhances, both. In short, for neurotheology to be successful, science must be kept rigorous and religion must be kept religious. 1. 2. 3. 4.

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