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History - Ancient History in depth: Viking Quest

History - Ancient History in depth: Viking Quest

http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/ancient/vikings/launch_gms_viking_quest.shtml

Related:  Age of Exploration

Viking Exploration Video - Vikings Last spring, HISTORY introduced viewers to a clan of Norse warriors with a rapacious appetite for warfare, knowledge and power. The gripping family saga of Ragnar, Rollo, Lagertha, friends and enemies was a tale of brutality and passion, alliances and infidelities, infighting and death. It portrayed life in the Dark Ages, a world ruled by raiders and explorers, through the eyes of Viking society.

Write Your Name in Runes Write Your Name in Runes The runic alphabet, or Futhark, gets its name from its first six letters (f, u, th, a, r, k), much like the word "alphabet" derives from the first two letters of the Greek alphabet, alpha and beta. Each rune not only represents a phonetic sound but also has its own distinct meaning often connected with Norse mythology.

Beowulf Study Guide A Study Guide Roy M. Liuzza Department of English University of Tennessee, Knoxville 301 McClung Tower Knoxville, TN 3796-0430 email rliuzza@utk.edu Viking Longships - Children's British History Encyclopedia Many Vikings were good sailors because they lived close to rivers and fjords (sea inlets). They grew up from childhood able to use ships for fishing and travelling. A big Viking longship would be about 30 metres long and were made from overlapping planks of oak wood joined together with iron rivets (bits of metal hammered into holes). Each ship could carry 60 men. Sea-chests were used to sit on when rowing and to store personal belongings.

Milk Carton Spanish Galleon Craft Materials: 2 milk cartons 2 straws playdough black and white paper (construction paper) glue, scissors and tape Optional: template pieces (see bottom of this page) -- you could also make them yourself with white paper and markers. Alternative: use craft foam instead of construction paper and you'll have a ship that you can play with in the bathtub. tape a piece of construction paper about 1/2 way up the milk carton as shown in the photo to the right. tape black construction paper all the way up the back of the milk carton, leaving about 1 inch sticking up over the carton tape white construction paper over the rest of the milk carton glue two blobs of playdough into the center of the Spanish galleon cut a two to three inch piece off the bottom of the second milk carton.

Beowulf at the British Library Beowulf: sole surviving manuscriptBritish Library Cotton MS Vitellius A.XV, f.132Copyright © The British Library BoardA high-quality version of this image can be purchased from British Library Images Online. For more information email imagesonline@bl.ukBuy this print What is Beowulf? Beowulf is the longest epic poem in Old English, the language spoken in Anglo-Saxon England before the Norman Conquest. More than 3,000 lines long, Beowulf relates the exploits of its eponymous hero, and his successive battles with a monster, named Grendel, with Grendel’s revengeful mother, and with a dragon which was guarding a hoard of treasure.

* 101 Viking Facts from the History Specialists 1. Vikings were very clean people (at least by comparison to other people at the time!). 2. 10 Things You May Not Know About Christopher Columbus - Reading for the Columbus Puzzlement. Must change one sentence in #4!!!! Inapproproate word. On October 12, 1492, Christopher Columbus set foot on the fine white sands of an island in the Bahamas, unfurled the Spanish royal standard and claimed the territory for King Ferdinand and Queen Isabella. Although Columbus thought he was in Asia, he had actually landed in the “New World.” History—for better and worse—would never be the same again. Here are 10 things you may not know about the famed explorer. 1.

Electronic Beowulf-Digital Collections Inventory Council on Library Resources Commission on Preservation and Access Preliminary Results Electronic Beowulf: British Library The original thousand-year-old manuscript of Beowulfs epic combats has been digitized by high resolution cameras. Middle Ages for Kids: Vikings Back to Middle Ages for kids The Vikings were people who lived in Northern Europe during the Middle Ages. They originally settled the Scandinavian lands that are today the countries of Denmark, Sweden, and Norway. The Vikings played a major role in Northern Europe during the Middle Ages, especially during the Viking Age which was from 800 CE to 1066 CE. Viking Raids The word Viking actually means "to raid" in Old Norse.

Vinland - Identifying the Viking Homeland in America In the 1960s, archaeologists Helge and Anne Stine Ingstad used the medieval Vinland Sagas to search for evidence of Viking landings on the North American continent. They eventually discovered the archaeological site of l'Anse aux Meadows, a Norse settlement on the coast of Newfoundland. But there was a problem—while the site was clearly constructed by Vikings, some aspects of the site vicinity didn't match what the sagas described. In particular, the Norse sagas refer to the Norse settlement as "Vinland", which translates to "Wineland" in old Norse. Historically, there were no grapes anywhere near l'Anse aux Meadows. To resolve this issue, the Ingstads argued that the word actually meant "Pastureland"—but that is something that very few Norse philologists accept.

Anglo-Saxon (Old English) Anglo-Saxon is the language that was spoken more than a thousand years ago in the southern part of what is now England. It is also called Old English and is the mother tongue from which Modern English is descended. But to speakers of Modern English it looks like an entirely different language. The following example, the first few lines from the epic poem Beowulf, will persuade you that we're not talking Shakespeare here:

Vikings Homework Help Where did the Vikings settle in Britain? The area eventually settled by Vikings was called the Danelaw. It formed a boundary separating Anglo-Saxon England from Viking England and was defined in a treaty between the English King Alfred and Viking King Guthrum in AD 880. It lay north of Watling Street, a Roman road running from London north-west to Chester and covered northern and eastern England. It included counties north of an imaginary line running from London to Bedford and then up to Chester.

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