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Copyright and Creative Commons Explained by Common Craft

Copyright and Creative Commons Explained by Common Craft
Julia’s dream is to make a living as a photographer. In this dream, she takes amazing photos, people buy them, and their purchases fund her future work. But it’s not that simple. Julia wants to publish some of her photos to help spread the word, but she’s concerned because photos are easy to copy. She could lose control and not be able to make a living from her talent. So she does some research and learns that in the U.S., as with other countries, we have laws that give creators of materials like books, images, movies, artwork and music a way to own and protect their creations. And she’s surprised to find that when she creates photos, she owns the copyright to them automatically, without taking any other action. She likes being covered by copyright law, but it limits her exposure, because her permission is required for sharing a photo. Her research leads her to Creative Commons, which is a set of licenses that she can use to make her copyrighted photos free for sharing.

https://www.commoncraft.com/video/copyright-and-creative-commons

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12 Emerging Educational Uses of Technology That are the Most Exciting Right Now Well, it's that time of year again … the start of a new school year. With it often comes the irresistible urge to make another list, or even better … many lists! Lists help us to plan, and they can also help us reflect and assess. One list I really enjoy putting together as we head into a new academic year is an updated look at which educational uses of technology have shown the most promise over the last year. Which tools and techniques most excite me as I look forward to another year of striving for continuous improvement as a teacher, technologist, and #edtech advocate? And as different technology uses take the spotlight, which of them are standing out a little less?

Copyright and Online Courses: Frequently Asked Questions Can I use copyrighted material in an online course module if access to the web page is restricted to students in the course? Perhaps. There are no guidelines specific for the use of copyright materials in developing online courses. Therefore, judgments must be made about the fair use of the material. See: What Does Fair Use Reallly Mean?Since audiovisual materials are, by law, excluded from transmission in educational settings, any that are included in on line courses will need to be licensed. Copyright and Primary Sources How do I use the Restriction Statements that accompany the American Memory collections? The Library of Congress assesses materials for legal considerations prior to placing items online (see legal assessment). The Restriction Statement that accompanies each American Memory collection provides known information regarding ownership of materials in the collection. If known, we include contacts for permission. In some cases the Restriction Statement will indicate that material in a particular collection may be used freely; in other cases the Restriction Statement may only be a starting point for your inquiry.

Welcome - Copyright Crash Course - LibGuides at University of Texas at Austin The Copyright Crash Course was created by Georgia Harper and is currently maintained by UT Libraries. The Course is arranged into several sections that allow users to explore certain areas of copyright law individually or as a group. The Course was originally created with faculty in mind, but can be used by anyone who is interested in understanding and managing their copyrights. If you need to take the Crash Course tutorial & test, click here (UT affiliation required). Version 1 of the Copyright Crash Course is available via Texas ScholarWorks. You are using Version 2.

Educators Guide to the use of Pinterest in Education Some educational Pinners to follow This is the editor of the famous blog cool cat teacher. It has over 69 boards all with more than 600 pins. Some of her best boards include "Teaching Ideas and App", Collaborative Writing", and " Global Collaboration in Education ".

Copyright for Educators Copyright for Educators is a series of videos designed to help educators learn about what they can and can’t do within the category of “Teaching” in the Copyright Act. Under the Copyright Act, there is nothing more intriguing and exciting for educators than Fair Use. Fair Use is the concept that if you are doing something for the greater good of society, like teaching, then your needs supersede the ownership rights of the copyright holder under the Copyright Act. Teachers, and by association, students, can legally use music, websites, videos, images, and a wealth of copyrighted materials for the purposes of teaching, that wouldn’t be accessible otherwise.

A Copyright-Friendly Toolkit However fabulous Creative Commons and Public Domain content may be, sometimes you really need to use copyrighted material. Say you plan to comment on popular media or current events. For instance, you may be planning to critique the portrayal of Native Americans in commercial films. You are going to want to “quote” some commercial films like Pocahontas, Lone Ranger, and Dances with Wolves. If you are reviewing a book, you may want to share its cover art.

The Educator’s Guide to Copyright, Fair Use, and Creative Commons Lately, we’ve been hearing more and more about digital copyrights and fair use in the news and online – particularly with the whole SOPA/PIPA uproar that recently swept the web. Also, we on the Edublogs support team have been getting more and more complaints and official requests to remove copyrighted content that users have placed on blogs. The legal jargon with respect to digital copyrights can be confusing – especially since different countries have their own laws and regulations. With this post, we hope to dispel a few myths and pull together a complete list of resources for teachers and students to use when blogging and working with content online.

Other Side of Plagiarism Most of my Head for the Edge columns, updated and edited, can be found in my latest book. Buy it and I might be able to afford a nicer nursing home one day. Thank you. The Other Side of Plagiarism Head for the Edge, Library Media Connection, September 2004

Copyright Infringement: 5 Myths vs Facts Embed Code For hosted site: Click the code to copy <div class='visually_embed'><img class='visually_embed_infographic' src=' alt='Copyright Infringement: 5 Myths vs Facts' /><div class='visually_embed_cycle'><span>by </span><a target='_blank' href=' <br/></div><script type='text/javascript' src=' class='visually_embed_script' id='visually_embed_script_88270'></script><p> From <a href='

Evaluating Web Pages: Techniques to Apply & Questions to Ask 1. What can the URL tell you? Techniques for Web Evaluation : Free To Use and Share: Resources To Help Teach Kids (and Adults!) About Copyright and Creative Commons I've gotten a few requests lately for resources on how to teach kids (and adults!) about copyright. I've written before about how I don't think any lesson on copyright can be effective without an emphasis on creative commons and helping students choose licenses for their own work. Still, there are plenty of good resources out there to help start these conversations or that can serve as reminders as you help create a culture of creativity and attribution at your school.

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