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Copyright Kids!

Copyright Kids!

http://www.copyrightkids.org/cbasicsframes.htm

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Why teach copyright to students? There are several reasons why it is important for students to develop a basic understanding of how copyright and limitations such as fair use work together to encourage creativity. Copyright is becoming an essential element of digital literacy – because everyone is a publisher now. Students today grow up with powerful technologies at their fingertips from very early ages. These technologies enable them to access, share, copy, generate, and collaborate on creative work in ways that are new and constantly evolving. Put simply, kids today may be large-scale consumers of online media, but they are also creators, publishers, distributors, and critics. It used to be common for students to hang their work on the family refrigerator.

Write Right Back: Recognizing Readers’ Needs and Expectations for E-mail Replies ReadWriteThink couldn't publish all of this great content without literacy experts to write and review for us. If you've got lessons plans, activities, or other ideas you'd like to contribute, we'd love to hear from you. More Find the latest in professional publications, learn new techniques and strategies, and find out how you can connect with other literacy professionals. Copyright and Primary Sources How do I use the Restriction Statements that accompany the American Memory collections? The Library of Congress assesses materials for legal considerations prior to placing items online (see legal assessment). The Restriction Statement that accompanies each American Memory collection provides known information regarding ownership of materials in the collection. If known, we include contacts for permission. In some cases the Restriction Statement will indicate that material in a particular collection may be used freely; in other cases the Restriction Statement may only be a starting point for your inquiry.

Rutgers University Libraries Copyright underlies our daily activity at the university- whether we realize it or not. When students create assignments, projects, paper, and theses, when they use other peoples’ works to support their scholarly and educational work, and when they copy materials in any format and on any platform, copyright law is relevant. There are two sides to copyright: Teaching With Glogster: Using Virtual Posters in the Classroom Grades 3 – 5 | Lesson Plan | Standard Lesson A Musical Prompt: Postcards From the Concert Students won't miss a beat in this musical lesson that combines listening with personal response on a postcard. Grades 3 – 6 | Lesson Plan | Standard Lesson Color My World: Expanding Meaning Potential through Media Using different writing/drawing materials (e.g., markers, color pencils, pastels, etc.), students learn how to communicate different moods and/or feelings to support their written ideas and how authors do the same through their work.

Copyright for Educators Copyright for Educators is a series of videos designed to help educators learn about what they can and can’t do within the category of “Teaching” in the Copyright Act. Under the Copyright Act, there is nothing more intriguing and exciting for educators than Fair Use. Fair Use is the concept that if you are doing something for the greater good of society, like teaching, then your needs supersede the ownership rights of the copyright holder under the Copyright Act. Teachers, and by association, students, can legally use music, websites, videos, images, and a wealth of copyrighted materials for the purposes of teaching, that wouldn’t be accessible otherwise.

Students and Copyright | Next Page What is copyright? A simple definition of copyright is that it is a bunch of rights in certain creative works (literary works, artistic works, musical works, computer programs, sound recordings, films and broadcasts) which can be used to stop others from copying the creative works without permission. Tech-Savvy Teaching Top apps for your class Graphite, a new website from Common Sense Media, rates apps, games, websites, and digital curricula. These elementary education apps are among their “top picks.” Find more reviews at graphite.org. • Teach Me: Kindergarten Young learners earn rewards like virtual stickers for acing math and spelling drills. A Copyright-Friendly Toolkit However fabulous Creative Commons and Public Domain content may be, sometimes you really need to use copyrighted material. Say you plan to comment on popular media or current events. For instance, you may be planning to critique the portrayal of Native Americans in commercial films. You are going to want to “quote” some commercial films like Pocahontas, Lone Ranger, and Dances with Wolves. If you are reviewing a book, you may want to share its cover art.

14 copyright essentials teachers and students must know Using copyrighted material incorrectly can land teachers and students in hot water. Here’s what you need to know to stay safe. (Image by Gerd Altmann via Pixabay.com / CC0) Students and teachers toe a very fuzzy ethical line every day — many without even realizing it. Some end up on the safe side of the line, but others cross the line and cross ethical boundaries — and sometimes costly legal ones. That line is the copyright line, deciding how teachers and students can respect people’s intellectual property. 100+ Teaching With the iPad Hacks: A Curated Playlist of Quick Start Resources A publisher recently asked me if I knew of a good iPad “Quick Start” Guide for teachers just getting started with using the iPad in the classroom. I didn’t, but had to imagine that I could find resources along these lines on the Web. As I searched, I found many good web pages, and knew right away that this was a great topic for creating a LessonPaths curated Playlist to share them. LessonPaths (formerly known as MentorMob) is an awesome free web tool for easily assembling digital content into an elegantly simple information resource. Just click through the Playlist, stop and further explore resources that interest you (clicking on one will open up the Playlist in full screen mode) then click through to the next one when you’re ready.

Free To Use and Share: Resources To Help Teach Kids (and Adults!) About Copyright and Creative Commons I've gotten a few requests lately for resources on how to teach kids (and adults!) about copyright. I've written before about how I don't think any lesson on copyright can be effective without an emphasis on creative commons and helping students choose licenses for their own work. Still, there are plenty of good resources out there to help start these conversations or that can serve as reminders as you help create a culture of creativity and attribution at your school.

Measuring Fair Use: The Four Factors Unfortunately, the only way to get a definitive answer on whether a particular use is a fair use is to have it resolved in federal court. Judges use four factors to resolve fair use disputes, as discussed in detail below. It’s important to understand that these factors are only guidelines that courts are free to adapt to particular situations on a case‑by‑case basis. In other words, a judge has a great deal of freedom when making a fair use determination, so the outcome in any given case can be hard to predict. The four factors judges consider are: the purpose and character of your usethe nature of the copyrighted workthe amount and substantiality of the portion taken, andthe effect of the use upon the potential market.

iPhone and iPad new user guide Everything you need to know about getting started with your new iPhone, iPod touch, iPad, or iPad mini New to the iPhone, iPod touch, iPad, or iPad and need a little help getting started? Whether you're trying to set up your device for the first time, or figure out Apple features like iCloud, Siri, iMessage, Notification Center, or FaceTime, or simply get a handle on the basics like mail, calendar, or photography, we have a help guide for you -- an ultimate guide!

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