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Copyright Kids!

Copyright Kids!

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Related:  Copyright ToolkitCurricular Role of the School Librarian

Government Resources for Science Images Most images are protected by copyright and cannot be reproduced without permission from the copyright owner. The exceptions are U.S. Government images, which generally are in the public domain and free from copyright. Even though the following image sources are from government Web sites, it is always good practice to make sure that the image is not protected by copyright. One way to do this is to look for the artist credit and copyright symbol (©). If there is a copyright symbol, ©, and a date (©2002) then that image is protected by copyright. Copyright and Creative Commons Explained by Common Craft Julia’s dream is to make a living as a photographer. In this dream, she takes amazing photos, people buy them, and their purchases fund her future work. But it’s not that simple. Julia wants to publish some of her photos to help spread the word, but she’s concerned because photos are easy to copy.

A Copyright-Friendly Toolkit However fabulous Creative Commons and Public Domain content may be, sometimes you really need to use copyrighted material. Say you plan to comment on popular media or current events. For instance, you may be planning to critique the portrayal of Native Americans in commercial films. You are going to want to “quote” some commercial films like Pocahontas, Lone Ranger, and Dances with Wolves. If you are reviewing a book, you may want to share its cover art.

Copyright and Primary Sources How do I use the Restriction Statements that accompany the American Memory collections? The Library of Congress assesses materials for legal considerations prior to placing items online (see legal assessment). The Restriction Statement that accompanies each American Memory collection provides known information regarding ownership of materials in the collection. If known, we include contacts for permission. In some cases the Restriction Statement will indicate that material in a particular collection may be used freely; in other cases the Restriction Statement may only be a starting point for your inquiry.

How to Cultivate a Bully-Free Community Fifth grade student Malcolm Lyon is especially tall for his age and well-spoken. When asked what he loved most about his school, Malcolm answered simply, “No bullying.” This might be surprising given the struggle with bullying that schools face nationwide. This August, Malcolm is starting his eighth year at Odyssey Community School, a small private school in Asheville, North Carolina that serves students in prekindergarten through high school. Excellent Video Tutorials for Teachers and Students to Learn about Copyright and Common Sense 1- Creatie Commons Kiwi 2- What is Creative Commons License 3- Creative Commons Copyright friendly content and more 4- Creative Commons Get Creative 5- Generating a creative Common sense license

Firefox and CC Search - Creative Commons A plugin for the Creative Commons search tool is built into some versions of the Firefox web browser. On most versions, the search box defaults to using Google. You can change your search engine by clicking on the small black arrow in the search bar. Reducing bullying and cyber bullying This fall, there are new and revamped laws in many states that address K-12 bullying and cyber bullying. In Massachusetts, we have one of the most comprehensive and far-reaching laws in the country. As in many states, K-12 teachers in Massachusetts have new responsibilities to respond to, report, and address bullying and cyber bullying. Here at the Massachusetts Aggression Reduction Center (MARC), we’ve developed 10 tips to help faculty cope with what can seem an overwhelming task. 1.

How to Find Public Domain and Creative Commons Images In last week's survey of Free Technology for Teachers readersFlickr The Commons, Photos for Class, and Pixabay were chosen as the best places to find public domain and Creative Commons images. All three can be used to find images that can be re-used in a variety of presentation formats. The videos embedded below provide an overview of how to use each image source. Pixabay hosts high quality public domain images. Public Domain Collections: Free to Share & Reuse That means everyone has the freedom to enjoy and reuse these materials in almost limitless ways. The Library now makes it possible to download such items in the highest resolution available directly from the Digital Collections website. Search Digital Collections

Resources to Fight Bullying and Harassment at School Each October, individuals and organizations nationwide work together to raise awareness of bullying during National Bullying Prevention Month, an initiative of the PACER Center. Whether you are an educator, education leader, parent, or other community member, you can take action to prevent bullying and harassment by fostering a culture of caring and respect in your school, home, and community. Use the resources below to support your efforts. In addition, consider participating in Edutopia's community to share your own insights and resources about bullying prevention.

Copyright-CopyWrong The Educators' Lean and Mean No FAT Guide to Fair Use By Hall Davidson You can't afford to ignore the law, but neither can you afford to overlook the needs of your students. Publish/Images/Flickr - Creative Commons How to publish on Flickr There are many ways to CC license your content in Flickr. The three main ways are 1) setting a default license for your account to apply the license to all new uploads, 2) batch-licensing all your previous uploads, or 3) selectively licensing some of your photos. Setting a default license To set a default CC license for your content, follow these directions: Classroom Management - It's Not About Control Last week I blogged about “Entrance and Exits” and how to manage them for a smooth transition. This week my focus is on what happens in-between the coming and going. You have many roles as a librarian—information specialist, instructional partner, teacher, and program administrator, but the one you will be judged on is teacher. Managing the library environment, as I noted, is challenging and many have difficulty with it. The topic is rarely covered in library school and what works in the classroom doesn’t translate easily to the library. You don’t have a regular seating arrangement, you don’t give grades, and there are many places where students can be out of sight.

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