background preloader

Dewey Pictograms

Dewey Pictograms
Reproducible images portraying collections within the Dewey Decimal Classification System, enabling people with disabilities, low literacy skills, etc., to better locate materials in the library's collection; these can be mounted on bookstacks or special mounts in the collection. Many thanks to OCLC (all copyright rights in the Dewey Decimal Classification System are owned by OCLC; Dewey, Dewey Decimal Classification, DDC, OCLC and WebDewey are registered trademarks of OCLC) and to Oakland (CA) Public Library for making these images freely available. The resource is a result of a collaboration between the Oakland Public Library and the East Bay Learning Disabilities Association (EastBayl da.org), supported by the California State Library. The 88 images were created by Shelby Designs & Illustrates (Oakland, CA) and the work was supported in part by the U.S. Introduction Pictograms for the Dewey Decimal System People with learning disabilities make up 17 to 20% of the general population.

http://libraryliteracy.org/staff/differences/dewey.html

Related:  ReferenceLibrary stuffTeacher Librarian ResourcesLibrary related

Libraries matter: 18 fantastic library infographics Library infographics presented below clearly show that being a librarian today is not about surviving any longer. It’s great that such infographics are created. Infographics are a fantastic way to draw attention of online users, and give facts not only in a more digestible, but also highly entertaining way. Many people still perceive libraries as awesome-looking magical places, full of a scent of old paper. We associate libraries with the past and with the analog world – the world that doesn’t fit into the broadband internet connection.

Digital Bytes Digital Bytes teaches teens digital citizenship through student-directed, media-rich activities that tackle real-world dilemmas. Teens learn from the experiences of their peers then create collaborative projects that voice their ideas for making smart, safe choices online. Digital Bytes is ideal for afterschool programs, community centers, or blended-learning classrooms that need short, relevant activities that teach digital citizenship and critical thinking about media consumption and creation. Here's what teens have to say about Digital Bytes: "I learned that not everything should be posted online.

Ditching Dewey: Choosing Genre Categories One of my favorite things to talk about in library land is the genrefication of our library. I frequently get questions about this from folks who have read my blog posts or have seen me present. I blogged about the process all along the way, from the tagging my fiction books, to genre shelving fiction, to ditching Dewey in nonfiction. Those posts were basically my reflections and thoughts from when I made the move. For a while now, I’ve been wanting to write a more comprehensive blog post that I can share as a reference for people interested in genrefying their library. Great Poems « Greatest Books of All Time A selection of great poems from centuries of brillant authors and poets. Whether you are new to the world of poetry and wish to savor it, or a well-versed poetry connoisseur, either way you will probably enjoy the classics of world poetry. The poems are sorted by vote. To vote for a poem, click on the

Share, inspire, connect: Library related Twitter hashtags Twitter is an outstanding tool for gaining inspiration with whatever turns you on and engaging with people of similar interests. For me Twitter has been a major boost for my professional life in terms of insights, inspiration, debates and network with the global library community. I slowly started using Twitter in 2012 when I was on the TICER Summer School in Tillburg and it took me a while to crack the code and come to a place where I got the full potential of this great tool. A part of it was related to the size of the network; where do you even start to build your professional learning network on Twitter? Well, a good place to start is via hashtags that binds various topics and discussions together.

10 Must Have Resources to Teach about Copyright and Fair Use 1- Copyright Advisory Network This web site is a way for librarians to learn about copyright and seek feedback and advice from fellow librarians and copyright specialists 2- Copyright and Fair Use Guidelines for Teachers This chart was designed to inform teachers of what they may do under the law. List of Dewey Decimal classes - Wikipedia The list of Dewey Decimal classes is structured around ten main classes covering the entire world of knowledge; each main class is further structured into ten hierarchical divisions, each having ten sections of increasing specificity.[1] As a system of library classification the DDC is "arranged by discipline, not subject," so a topic like clothing is classed based on its disciplinary treatment (psychological influence of clothing at 155.95, customs associated with clothing at 391, and fashion design of clothing at 746.92) within the conceptual framework.[2] The list below presents the ten main classes, hundred divisions, and thousand sections.[3] Class 000 – Computer science, information & general works[edit] Class 100 – Philosophy & psychology[edit] Class 200 – Religion[edit] Class 300 – Social sciences[edit] Class 400 – Language[edit]

Dark Roasted Blend "QUANTUM SHOT" #531Link - by Avi Abrams Army of tiny robots grows in number and sophistication Since our last "Robot Art" overview came out, these cute little bots multiplied like rabbits or Google spiders, and they all look good, so it's time for an update! (image courtesy Mike Rivamonte) Most of these robot figures (often called "nerdbots") are made from found objects, purely for your esthetic appreciation - and yet one can't shake the feeling that they might one day come to life (as if in some Stephen King story) and invade your cubicle, making shrill R2D2 sounds and mounting attacks on, say, a hated monstrous copy machine in the corner.

10 Golden Rules To Take Your Library’s Twitter Account to the Next Level Ned Potter If you’re reading this, I’m sure you’re already aware how important Twitter is to libraries. 32 percent of Internet users are on the platform, but more importantly, they’re our type of Internet users! There is a strong overlap in the kinds of people who use libraries (or would do if they knew what we offered) and the kinds of people who tweet. And unlike some other social media, Twitter users are receptive to interacting with libraries on this platform. However, something you see a lot with library Twitter accounts, is a plateau in followers, use, and value. The initial optimism and freshness associated with the medium gives way, usually after 6 months or so, to a feeling that you have two-or-three hundred followers but you’re no longer moving on up.

6 Best Desktop eBook Readers For Reading At Home (Or At Work) Do some reading on your computer. Whether you’re looking for free access to classic works of literature or desktop access to your current Kindle, Kobo or Nook books, there is a wide variety of eBook readers out there so you can read on your computer. Reading on a computer isn’t without its advantages. Dewey Decimal Classification System 600 Technology (Applied sciences) 601 Philosophy & theory 602 Miscellany Free Media Library in Blooms This list is distinctive as the resources are a) free and b) almost exclusively browser based. The list is also sorted by Blooms, meaning you are able to more easily consider your student outcomes FIRST. There are a few exceptions.

Signage by Design: A Design-Thinking Approach to Library User Experience This paper was refereed by Weave's peer reviewers. Abstract Signage is a powerful visual tool for communication and a crucial component of the library user experience. Signage can welcome, guide, instruct, and delight users, helping them navigate the complex information world of any library. In practice, however, signage can be problematic, revealing tensions between various stakeholders, and contributing to visual noise through information overload; this often leads to signage blindness, library anxiety, and confusion. This article explores how libraries can use a design-thinking approach to improve the user experience in physical library spaces, particularly with respect to signage, based on our experience at the UTS Library, a university library in Australia that serves the University of Technology Sydney (UTS).

Related: