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Quantum physics just got less complicated

Quantum physics just got less complicated
Here's a nice surprise: quantum physics is less complicated than we thought. An international team of researchers has proved that two peculiar features of the quantum world previously considered distinct are different manifestations of the same thing. The result is published 19 December in Nature Communications. Patrick Coles, Jedrzej Kaniewski, and Stephanie Wehner made the breakthrough while at the Centre for Quantum Technologies at the National University of Singapore. They found that 'wave-particle duality' is simply the quantum 'uncertainty principle' in disguise, reducing two mysteries to one. "The connection between uncertainty and wave-particle duality comes out very naturally when you consider them as questions about what information you can gain about a system. The discovery deepens our understanding of quantum physics and could prompt ideas for new applications of wave-particle duality. Explore further: A new 'lens' for looking at quantum behavior

http://phys.org/news/2014-12-quantum-physics-complicated.html

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