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Are You Living in a Computer Simulation?

Are You Living in a Computer Simulation?
Traditional philosophical skepticism and brain-in-a-vat arguments: Skepticism: A Contemporary Reader. DeRose, K. and Warfield, T. A. (eds.) (1999). Oxford University Press, Oxford.

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How to Build a Universe That Doesn't Fall Apart Two Days Later First, before I begin to bore you with the usual sort of things science fiction writers say in speeches, let me bring you official greetings from Disneyland. I consider myself a spokesperson for Disneyland because I live just a few miles from it—and, as if that were not enough, I once had the honor of being interviewed there by Paris TV. For several weeks after the interview, I was really ill and confined to bed. I think it was the whirling teacups that did it. Elizabeth Antebi, who was the producer of the film, wanted to have me whirling around in one of the giant teacups while discussing the rise of fascism with Norman Spinrad... an old friend of mine who writes excellent science fiction. We also discussed Watergate, but we did that on the deck of Captain Hook's pirate ship.

Why you shouldn't exercise to lose weight, explained with 60+ studies 1) An evolutionary clue to how our bodies burn calories When anthropologist Herman Pontzer set off from Hunter College in New York to Tanzania to study one of the few remaining hunter-gatherer tribes on the planet, he expected to find a group of calorie burning machines. Unlike Westerners, who increasingly spend their waking hours glued to chairs, the Hadza are on the move most of the time. Men typically go off and hunt — chasing and killing animals, climbing trees in search of wild honey.

47 Mind-Blowing Psychological Facts You Should Know About Yourself I’ve decided to start a series called 100 Things You Should Know about People. As in: 100 things you should know if you are going to design an effective and persuasive website, web application or software application. Or maybe just 100 things that everyone should know about humans! The order that I’ll present these 100 things is going to be pretty random. So the fact that this first one is first doesn’t mean that’s it’s the most important.. just that it came to mind first. Dr. 40 technologies to watch in 2011 If the popular misreading of Mayan mythology is correct, we have fewer than two more years left on this Earth. That leaves precious little time for the tech industry to develop and perfect of all the cool technologies that sci-fi authors have dreamed up over the years. Still, while a December 2012 apocalypse may spell doom for the commercial viability of hovercars, it doesn't mean that the next couple of years in tech will be dull — quite the contrary. 2011 is already shaping up to be a banner year for tech and web innovation. Below is a list of over 40 websites, apps, companies, gadgets and technologies that the editors of Mashable think that you should keep an eye on over the coming year. None of them let you zoom through the air over traffic, but they're definitely all worth a look. Be sure to click through to each article to see our full write ups on individual entries, and let us know in the comments what you're looking out for in 2011.

Allegory of the Cave Plato realizes that the general run of humankind can think, and speak, etc., without (so far as they acknowledge) any awareness of his realm of Forms. The allegory of the cave is supposed to explain this. In the allegory, Plato likens people untutored in the Theory of Forms to prisoners chained in a cave, unable to turn their heads. All they can see is the wall of the cave. MEME : Gratuitous Grace Aldous and I would give a (LSD) session to a friend or someone who wanted and the preparation for a session was very very careful. The day before we didnt do anything we just fixed the house very quietly, the day of the session there was nothing except that and even the day after; so there was a three day thing because as Aldous wrote in Island the session is a gratuitous grace. Its what you take away from there. A gratuitous grace, something thats given to you for nothing, not that you merit it you just are lucky and get it but what you do with it afterwards is what counts. Laura Archera Huxley 'Liberation,' Dr Robert began again, 'the ending of sorrow, ceasing to be what you ignorantly think you are and becoming what you are in fact.

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Brief Answers to Cosmic Questions Structure of the Universe Does the Universe have an edge, beyond which there is nothing? Are the galaxies arranged on the surface of a sphere? Why can't we see the whole universe? Narcotics Cookbook sign up Login Paper Key Courses Deep Time : A History of the Earth - Interactive Infographic Life on the planet started astonishingly early. The first living organisms, in the current model of evolution, are thought to be Prokaryotes1. The oldest known fossilised prokaryotes have been dated to approximately 3.5 billion years ago, only 1 billion years after the formation of the Earth's crust. Eukaryotes2 are more advanced organisms with complex cell structures, each of which contains a nucleus.

Why You've Never Really Tasted Your 6 Favorite Foods #3. Artificial Colors Dictate Our Food Choices rez-art/iStock/Getty Images You're an independent thinker.

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