background preloader

Less Popular Google Search Tips

Less Popular Google Search Tips
There’s not a day that passes by without searching for information on Google. We’re pretty sure that you’re aware of some advanced Google search operators like AND, NOT, etc. but here are some lesser known tricks that you can implement when you’re searching on Google. We bet you wouldn’t know at least one of these! 1. Some of you would have known the site: search operator. Forget the site operator and use the at keyword instead. 2. The nerds among us would frequently use the define: keyword to look up for definitions. You needn’t necessarily use the define keyword anymore to get definitions in search results. 3. AROUND(n) is an undocumented search operator and it will be of immense use when you’re looking for pages with two terms separated by n number of words. 4. You can use the tilde (~) operator to search for pages that not only contain the word that follows it, but also its synonyms. The next time you’re looking for cheap mp3 players, try searching for [~cheap mp3 players].

7 Useful Google Cheatsheets – Download for Free! I know that our readers love cheat sheets: our last year’s post listing SEO cheatsheets had a great response. This week I have collected another set of useful lists that will allow you to use Google services to their full potential. Enjoy! 7 useful Google cheatsheets: 1. Google Search Cheatsheet: Google Shortcuts Download here: Google (and Yahoo) Search Shortcuts A search shortcut is any pre-defined combination of characters / words that allows to quickly get an answer to your initial question. Favorite shortcuts: 2. Download link: Google Advanced Operators Google has quite a few search operators. 3. Download link: Google Analytics Cheatsheet Google Analytics has tons of features – so this cheatsheet (courtesy of Ian Lurie) must have involved tons of work. 4. Download link: Gmail Shortcuts on Scribd and this graphical cheat sheet With Gmail labs and third-party tools, Gmail web interface is quickly becoming the preferred email management application. Personal favorites: 5. Download links: 6. 7.

How to Search Google Like a Pro: 11 Tricks You Have to Know Google is a powerful tool, but you’re missing out on a lot of that power if you just type words into it. Master Google and find the best results faster with these search tricks. Whether you’re an inexperienced user or a seasoned professional, you’ll probably find at least one search operator you weren’t aware of here. Many of Google’s search operators aren’t very well-known. Exact Words and Phrases One of the most basic and widely known search tricks is using quotation marks to search for an exact phrase. “Hello World” This same method now works for exact-word queries. “mining” Excluding a Word The minus sign allows you to specify words that shouldn’t appear in your results. linux distributions -ubuntu Site Search The site: operator allows you to perform a search in a specific site. site:howtogeek.com windows 7 You can also use the site: operator to specify a domain. Related Words ~geek Apparently, “Linux” is the most similar word to geek, followed by “Greek.” The Wildcard Time Ranges File Type

Google Search Operators - Search Help You can use symbols or words in your search to make your search results more precise. Google Search usually ignores punctuation that isn’t part of a search operator. Don’t put spaces between the symbol or word and your search term. A search for site:nytimes.com will work, but site: nytimes.com won’t. Refine image searches Overall Advanced Search Go to Advanced Image Search. Search for an exact image size Right after the word you're looking for, add the text imagesize:widthxheight. Example: imagesize:500x400 Common search techniques Search social media Put @ in front of a word to search social media. Search for a price Put $ in front of a number. Search hashtags Put # in front of a word. Exclude words from your search Put - in front of a word you want to leave out. Search for an exact match Put a word or phrase inside quotes. Search within a range of numbers Put .. between two numbers. Combine searches Put "OR" between each search query. Search for a specific site Search for related sites

Technology - News 2050: ‘Hypersonic take-off’ As part of the BBC's What If? season of programmes, we commissioned a week of news reports that take a light-hearted look at the future. In the fifth instalment, The first flights at six times the speed of sound mean London and Sydney are just a few hours apart, while light pollution forces astronomers to close the last telescope on Earth. Have we got it right? Could these stories feature in the headlines in 2050? 101 Google Tips, Tricks & Hacks Looking for the ultimate tips for Google searching? You've just found the only guide to Google you need. Let's get started: 1. The best way to begin searching harder with Google is by clicking the Advanced Search link. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23, In fact, you can combine any Boolean search operators, as long as your syntax is correct. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30. 31. 32. 33.

Inside Search Google Guide Quick Reference: Google Advanced Operators (Cheat Sheet) The following table lists the search operators that work with each Google search service. Click on an operator to jump to its description — or, to read about all of the operators, simply scroll down and read all of this page. The following is an alphabetical list of the search operators. This list includes operators that are not officially supported by Google and not listed in Google’s online help. Each entry typically includes the syntax, the capabilities, and an example. allinanchor: If you start your query with allinanchor:, Google restricts results to pages containing all query terms you specify in the anchor text on links to the page. Anchor text is the text on a page that is linked to another web page or a different place on the current page. allintext: If you start your query with allintext:, Google restricts results to those containing all the query terms you specify in the text of the page. allintitle: allinurl: In URLs, words are often run together. author: cache: define: ext: group:

Power Google www.google.com Welcome to Power Google, By Robert Harris, a practical, how-to book about using Google to locate information on the Internet. Below you will find a brief description of each chapter’s content along with two formats in which they can be viewed (Adobe® or HTML). Please note: Download times will depend on the Internet connection. Chapter 1: Why use Google? (41.0K) | or |HTML| Chapter 2: Developing a Search StrategyIf you want only a quick take on a common idea, you can simply type in the appropriate phrase into Google’s search box and quickly find your answer. (41.0K) | or |HTML| Chapter 3: Building a QueryOne of the advantages of Google’s effective method of finding and ordering pages for you is that even a simple search, such as typing in a couple of words, can produce excellent results. (42.0K) | or |HTML| (48.0K) | or |HTML| (37.0K) | or |HTML| (39.0K) | or |HTML| (52.0K) | or |HTML| (38.0K) | or |HTML| Chapter 9: More GoogleGoogle features much more than a Web search engine.

Healthy Woman Dreams of Becoming Paralyzed from the Waist Down Being stuck in a wheelchair for the rest of their lives is most people’s idea of hell, but not for Chloe Jennings-White. A 57-year-old chemist from Salt Lake City, Utah, has an unnatural desire to become a paraplegic (paralyzed from the waist down). Chloe lives the life of a disabled person. She moves around in a wheelchair and wears long leg braces that lock at the knee to enable her to ambulate with crutches. But when she needs to go up or down a flight of stairs, she simply stands up, removes her braces and walks like a normal person. Like most paralyzed people, she loves outdoor activities, only instead of using specialized equipment to enable such activities, she simply goes on 12-hour hikes in the woods, skies down dangerous slopes, climbs mountain peaks, like a normal person. Photo: Jen Longhurst / Beyond Productions - National Geographic Taboo Ever since she was a little girl, Chloe dreamed about becoming paralyzed below the waist. Reddit Stumble

Gmail Toolbox: 60+ Tools For Gmail With Google announcing the ability to increase your Gmail storage capacity this week, we decided to delve into other ways to extend and enhance Google's popular webmail service. Presenting: 60+ tools and resources for Gmail. Desktop Applications GCount - An application for Mac OSX that alerts you to new mail. gDisk - An app for Mac OSX giving the ability to turn Gmail accounts into storage drives. gFeeder - A small ticker for your Gmail that will let you know at a glance what's coming in for you. GetMail - Allows you to migrate your emails from Hotmail to your Gmail account. Gmail Drive - Another tool for turning your Gmail account in to a virtual storage drive, this one works directly from inside Windows Explorer. Gmail Loader - For Windows or Linux, aids you in loading your email to your Gmail account. GMailFS - Turns your Gmail space into a virtual drive that your Windows Explorer can see. GotMailG - A Mac widget to display the number of unread messages in your inbox. Firefox Tools

SearchReSearch How To Use Google Search As An Online Timer Learn about a simple search command that will let you use Google as an online timer to help you remind of any upcoming tasks. Use Google as an Online Timer Do you need a simple timer to remind you of upcoming tasks like picking up the laundary, making that phone call to your client or for sticking to the Pomodoro technique. That’s because you can now setup online timers inside Google itself by entering the timer command in the search box in the following format (the word “set” is optional): timer for <time> OR set timer for <time> The <time> can use a combination of hours, minutes and seconds. One more thing. This tip is courtesy Lifehacker.

Related:  supportbrainstormWissensmanagement