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Geert Hofstede Cultural Dimensions

Geert Hofstede Cultural Dimensions
Want to dig deeper into culture? The Hofstede Centre and its partners offer a wide variety of courses. In addition, you can find links to recommended books and products about culture, our facebook page and info about The Hofstede Centre itself. This website provides you with insights in Hofstede's research and the research of his colleagues into national and organisational culture. Besides the research outcomes, such as country scores on the dimensions of national culture, you will find an online survey to determine your personal score on Hofstede's dimensions, mobile applications for the same purpose, video clips and much more! This website uses copyrighted information from Professor Geert Hofstede's books, for which The Hofstede Centre has been licensed by Professor Hofstede.

Related:  Intercultural CommunicationInterkulturellesCultureLibraryMehrsprachigkeit

Intercultural Communication Articles For fresh articles and content visit our blog! Below you will find access to a range of articles relating to cross cultural and intercultural communication. The articles touch upon a number of topics that will be of interest to a wide range of reader involved in intercultural communication such as international business personnel, HR staff, people working in public services and in many other areas where intercultural communication is an issue. Intercultural Training Articles > An Introduction to Intercultural Communication - a basic summary of the purpose of intercultural communication. > Cross Cultural Communication Consultants - A look at the role, skills and qualifications of cross cultural communication consultants.

Cultural Dimensions - Geert Hofstede Geert Hofstede’s scientific innovation, the dimension concept Geert Hofstede has defined “culture” as “the collective programming of the mind that distinguishes the members of one group or category of people from others”. In 1980 he published his book “Culture’s Consequences: International Differences in Work-Related Values”. As the title suggests, this book was entirely devoted to the study of culture at the national level, in which values played a major role. The book’s main innovation was its use of the concept (paradigm) of dimensions of culture: basic problems to which different national societies have over time developed different answers. National Culture About the research Professor Geert Hofstede conducted one of the most comprehensive studies of how values in the workplace are influenced by culture. He analysed a large database of employee value scores collected within IBM between 1967 and 1973.

The 4Ss of Note-Taking With Technology Recently, a number of articles have surfaced reporting the ineffectiveness of note taking with laptops, in keeping with the findings of Pam Mueller and Daniel Oppenheimer detailed in The Pen Is Mightier Than the Keyboard. These authors assert that when students used laptops in lecture courses, they transcribed notes rather than synthesized information. As a result, those students then performed poorly on cognitively demanding tasks. However, before making a blanket statement that one device may be better than another (e.g. pen vs. laptop) or calling into question what may be the best note-taking system, what if we approach the concept by identifying what is best for individual students? In other words, does the system . . . Adequately support the students' learning needs?

10th International Conference on Multilingualism and Third Language Acquisition » Call for Papers The 10th International Conference on Multilingualism and Third Language Acquisition will be held at Vienna University in September 1st-3rd, 2016. We welcome original and previously unpublished papers on research on the acquisition or use of three or more languages. The language of the conference is predominantly English, but contributions in other languages are welcome (slides in English). Keynote speakers Suresh Canagarajah, Department of Applied Linguistics, Pennsylvania State University Suzanne Flynn, Department of Linguistics and Philosophy, MIT

Hofstede's Cultural Dimensions - Leadership Training from MindTools Understanding Workplace Values Around the World Learn how to be more sensitive to the needs of people in different cultures. We know that we are living in a global age. Technology has brought everyone much closer together. This means that people of different cultures find themselves working together and communicating more and more. Germany - Geert Hofstede If we explore the German culture through the lens of the 6-D Model©, we can get a good overview of the deep drivers of German culture relative to other world cultures. Power DistanceThis dimension deals with the fact that all individuals in societies are not equal – it expresses the attitude of the culture towards these inequalities amongst us. Power Distance is defined as the extent to which the less powerful members of institutions and organisations within a country expect and accept that power is distributed unequally. Highly decentralised and supported by a strong middle class, Germany is not surprisingly among the lower power distant countries (score 35). Co-determination rights are comparatively extensive and have to be taken into account by the management. A direct and participative communication and meeting style is common, control is disliked and leadership is challenged to show expertise and best accepted when it’s based on it.

Countries Please select a country in the dropdown menu above to see the values for the 6 dimensions. After a first country has been selected, a second and even a third country can be chosen to be able to see a comparison of their scores. To compare your personal preferences to the scores of a country of your choice, please purchase our cultural survey tool, the Culture Compass™. 3 Things You Didn’t Know About Microsoft Excel Are you utilizing Microsoft Excel to its fullest? Here are three things you might not have known Excel could do: Sparklines With Sparklines in Excel 2013, you are able to provide a more in-depth view of the data other than just simply using the numbers. Use Sparklines to show trends such as increases and decreases or economic cycles.