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Journal of Intercultural Communication

Journal of Intercultural Communication
Related:  Intercultural StudiesINTERCULTURAL COMMUNICATION

Intercultural Communication Articles For fresh articles and content visit our blog! Below you will find access to a range of articles relating to cross cultural and intercultural communication. The articles touch upon a number of topics that will be of interest to a wide range of reader involved in intercultural communication such as international business personnel, HR staff, people working in public services and in many other areas where intercultural communication is an issue. Intercultural Training Articles > An Introduction to Intercultural Communication - a basic summary of the purpose of intercultural communication. > Cross Cultural Communication Consultants - A look at the role, skills and qualifications of cross cultural communication consultants. > Definition of Intercultural Communication - what does intercultural communication mean? > Cross Cultural Understanding - an examination of common cross cultural terms and their meanings. > Stereotypes: An Intercultural No-No - why stereotyping is dangerous.

Protocol Professionals, Inc. | Chinese Etiquette & Protocol Confucius, China's greatest sage established a system of ethics, morals, hierarchy and behavior, setting the rules for people dealing with other people, and establishing each person's proper place in society. The five major relationships set forth by Confucius: Key concepts in understanding Chinese culture: Guanxi - Throughout much of Chinese history, the fundamental glue that has held society together is the concept of guanxi, relationships between people. Mianzi - Face - Losing face, saving face and giving face is very important and should be taken into consideration at all times. Li - Originally li meant to sacrifice, but today it is translated as the art of being polite and courteous. Keqi - Ke means guest and qi means behavior. Getting to Know Each Other Greetings and Introductions

Multicultural Marketing News Write Angle Film writing Contest from B4U and Sulekha a Huge Success The "Write Angle" global contest for great movie ideas, organized by B4U and co-sponsored by MetLife, closed for submissions on March 15, 2002, as a great success attracting more than 1,800 entries. The Write Angle contest, aimed to spot originality and creativity in film writing by Indians and Indophiles worldwide, offers them an unprecedented opportunity of making a Bollywood film next year. The contest was conducted at Sulekha the biggest and most acclaimed online community for Indians worldwide, sustained solely by the creative contributions of its members. Write Angle's panel of judges and internationally acclaimed filmmakers -- Shyam Benegal, Javed Akhtar, Mahesh Bhatt, Mira Nair, Tanuja Chandra, Farook Dhondy, John Mathan, Honey Irani and Santosh Sivan -- are reviewing the entries and will, in June, announce the winning movie idea entries. Hari Srinivas, U.S.

How Intercultural Competence Drives Success in Global Virtual Teams Leveraging global virtual teams through intercultural curiosity, sensitivity, and respect. By David Callen, MSOD 2008 Volume 11 Issue 4 *Winner of the 2008 Graziadio School Student Paper CompetitionOrganizations are increasingly turning to global virtual teams to gain a strategic advantage. We have a stronger team because people have intercultural competence. Image by David Luscombe What is Intercultural Competence? Intercultural competence is the body of knowledge and skills to successfully interact with people from other ethnic, religious, cultural, national, and geographic groups. Global Virtual Teams and Intercultural Competence Intercultural competence is a relatively unexamined aspect of global virtual teams. While intuitively there is a link between a team member’s ability to successfully interact with others and the degree of team effectiveness, based on the findings of the study, organizations are currently not paying attention to intercultural competence as an important factor.

La Communication Interculturelle Hofstede's Cultural Dimensions - Leadership Training from MindTools Understanding Workplace Values Around the World Learn how to be more sensitive to the needs of people in different cultures. We know that we are living in a global age. Technology has brought everyone much closer together. This is exciting, but it can also be frustrating and fraught with uncertainty. Building connections with people from around the world is just one dimension of cultural diversity. How can we understand cultural differences? Fortunately, psychologist Dr Geert Hofstede asked himself this question in the 1970s. With access to people working for the same organization in over 40 countries of the world, he collected cultural data and analyzed his findings. He scored each country using a scale of roughly 0 to 100 for each dimension. The Five Dimensions of Culture Armed with a large database of cultural statistics, Hofstede analyzed the results and found clear patterns of similarity and difference amid the responses along these five dimensions. The five dimensions are: 1. 2. 3.

Cross-Cultural Adaptation COM 372—Theory and Research in Intercultural Communication Updated 11 June 2013 A General Introduction Adaptation: Going Abroad · Many authors have theorized and researched the notion of cross-cultural adaptation, which entails moving from one culture to another culture, usually (but not always) learning the rules, norms, customs, and language of the new culture. o Short-term travelers, such as those on vacations or business trips. o Sojourners, those who travel to a culture for an extended time, but still one with planned limits—that is, a plan to return, such as international students or those on an extended business assignment of (for example), one to three years o Immigrants, those who move to another culture with plans of making that culture their new home · Of course, even immigrants can vary on several dimensions, which become important later, such as: o Social class/support: Often, but not always, social class combines with purpose of immigration. Today’s notes cover two main themes: o

Ivy Sea Online: What are the elements of organizational culture? Inspired Leadership and Organizational Culture Inquiring into the elements of organizational culture In a survey conducted by PricewaterhouseCoopers and The World Economic Forum, CEOs said that reshaping corporate culture and employee behavior ranked among their top priorities, along with setting the vision and strategy of the organization. Unfortunately, according to a variety of surveys - which have been somewhat consistent over the years - employees are disturbed by or don't find credible the communication coming from the executive ranks. Then why do issues of culture and communication continue to be a key stumbling block for many merged, reorganized or fast-growing companies? By answering some or all of the questions included in the full text of this article — and other questions that complete the list for your own organization — you'll begin an informal audit of your company's culture as it is in action versus the more idealistic public relations sound bites.

Hall's cultural factors Explanations > Culture > Hall's cultural factors Time | Context | Space | So what? Edward T. Hall was an anthropologist who made early discoveries of key cultural factors. In particular he is known for his high and low context cultural factors. Context High context In a high-context culture, there are many contextual elements that help people to understand the rules. This can be very confusing for person who does not understand the 'unwritten rules' of the culture. Low context In a low-context culture, very little is taken for granted. Contrasting the two French contracts tend to be short (in physical length, not time duration) as much of the information is available within the high-context French culture. Highly mobile environments where people come and go need lower-context culture. Note the similarity with Trompenaars' Universalism (low context) and Particularism (high context). Time Monochronic time M-Time, as he called it, means doing one thing at a time. Polychronic time Space Contrasting

Richard Lewis Communications - Specialising in languages, communication skills & cross-culture. Hofstede's cultural dimensions theory Overview[edit] Hofstede's cultural dimensions theory is a framework for cross-cultural communication. Hofstede developed his original model as a result of using factor analysis to examine the results of a world-wide survey of employee values by IBM in the 1960s and 1970s. The theory was one of the first that could be quantified, and could be used to explain observed differences between cultures. The original theory proposed four dimensions along which cultural values could be analyzed: individualism-collectivism; uncertainty avoidance; power distance (strength of social hierarchy) and masculinity-femininity (task orientation versus person-orientation). Hofstede's work established a major research tradition in cross-cultural psychology and has also been drawn upon by researchers and consultants in many fields relating to international business and communication. History[edit] In 1965, Geert founded the personnel research department of IBM Europe (which he managed until 1971).

Southeast Asia Southeast Asia or Southeastern Asia is a subregion of Asia, consisting of the countries that are geographically south of China, east of India, west of New Guinea and north of Australia.[1] The region lies on the intersection of geological plates, with heavy seismic and volcanic activity. Southeast Asia consists of two geographic regions: The major religions are Islam, Buddhism and Taoism, followed by Christianity. However, a wide variety of religions are found throughout the region, including Hinduism and many animist-influenced practices.[3] Divisions[edit] A constructed map shows the diversity of every culture in Southeast Asia. Political[edit] Countries[edit] Territories[edit] Location of Southeast Asia[8] Administrative subdivisions of countries[edit] Geographical[edit] Southeast Asia is geographically divided into two subregions, namely Mainland Southeast Asia (or Indochina) and Maritime Southeast Asia (or the similarly defined Malay Archipelago) (Indonesian: Nusantara). History[edit]

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