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Journal of Intercultural Communication

Journal of Intercultural Communication
Related:  Intercultural StudiesINTERCULTURAL COMMUNICATION

Protocol Professionals, Inc. | Chinese Etiquette & Protocol Confucius, China's greatest sage established a system of ethics, morals, hierarchy and behavior, setting the rules for people dealing with other people, and establishing each person's proper place in society. The five major relationships set forth by Confucius: Key concepts in understanding Chinese culture: Guanxi - Throughout much of Chinese history, the fundamental glue that has held society together is the concept of guanxi, relationships between people. Mianzi - Face - Losing face, saving face and giving face is very important and should be taken into consideration at all times. Li - Originally li meant to sacrifice, but today it is translated as the art of being polite and courteous. Keqi - Ke means guest and qi means behavior. Getting to Know Each Other Greetings and Introductions

How Intercultural Competence Drives Success in Global Virtual Teams Leveraging global virtual teams through intercultural curiosity, sensitivity, and respect. By David Callen, MSOD 2008 Volume 11 Issue 4 *Winner of the 2008 Graziadio School Student Paper CompetitionOrganizations are increasingly turning to global virtual teams to gain a strategic advantage. We have a stronger team because people have intercultural competence. Image by David Luscombe What is Intercultural Competence? Intercultural competence is the body of knowledge and skills to successfully interact with people from other ethnic, religious, cultural, national, and geographic groups. Global Virtual Teams and Intercultural Competence Intercultural competence is a relatively unexamined aspect of global virtual teams. While intuitively there is a link between a team member’s ability to successfully interact with others and the degree of team effectiveness, based on the findings of the study, organizations are currently not paying attention to intercultural competence as an important factor.

La Communication Interculturelle Cross-Cultural Adaptation COM 372—Theory and Research in Intercultural Communication Updated 11 June 2013 A General Introduction Adaptation: Going Abroad · Many authors have theorized and researched the notion of cross-cultural adaptation, which entails moving from one culture to another culture, usually (but not always) learning the rules, norms, customs, and language of the new culture. o Short-term travelers, such as those on vacations or business trips. o Sojourners, those who travel to a culture for an extended time, but still one with planned limits—that is, a plan to return, such as international students or those on an extended business assignment of (for example), one to three years o Immigrants, those who move to another culture with plans of making that culture their new home · Of course, even immigrants can vary on several dimensions, which become important later, such as: o Social class/support: Often, but not always, social class combines with purpose of immigration. Today’s notes cover two main themes: o

Intercultural Communication Articles For fresh articles and content visit our blog! Below you will find access to a range of articles relating to cross cultural and intercultural communication. The articles touch upon a number of topics that will be of interest to a wide range of reader involved in intercultural communication such as international business personnel, HR staff, people working in public services and in many other areas where intercultural communication is an issue. Intercultural Training Articles > An Introduction to Intercultural Communication - a basic summary of the purpose of intercultural communication. > Cross Cultural Communication Consultants - A look at the role, skills and qualifications of cross cultural communication consultants. > Definition of Intercultural Communication - what does intercultural communication mean? > Cross Cultural Understanding - an examination of common cross cultural terms and their meanings. > Stereotypes: An Intercultural No-No - why stereotyping is dangerous.

Richard Lewis Communications - Specialising in languages, communication skills & cross-culture. Southeast Asia Southeast Asia or Southeastern Asia is a subregion of Asia, consisting of the countries that are geographically south of China, east of India, west of New Guinea and north of Australia.[1] The region lies on the intersection of geological plates, with heavy seismic and volcanic activity. Southeast Asia consists of two geographic regions: The major religions are Islam, Buddhism and Taoism, followed by Christianity. However, a wide variety of religions are found throughout the region, including Hinduism and many animist-influenced practices.[3] Divisions[edit] A constructed map shows the diversity of every culture in Southeast Asia. Political[edit] Countries[edit] Territories[edit] Location of Southeast Asia[8] Administrative subdivisions of countries[edit] Geographical[edit] Southeast Asia is geographically divided into two subregions, namely Mainland Southeast Asia (or Indochina) and Maritime Southeast Asia (or the similarly defined Malay Archipelago) (Indonesian: Nusantara). History[edit]

Hall's cultural factors Explanations > Culture > Hall's cultural factors Time | Context | Space | So what? Edward T. Hall was an anthropologist who made early discoveries of key cultural factors. In particular he is known for his high and low context cultural factors. Context High context In a high-context culture, there are many contextual elements that help people to understand the rules. This can be very confusing for person who does not understand the 'unwritten rules' of the culture. Low context In a low-context culture, very little is taken for granted. Contrasting the two French contracts tend to be short (in physical length, not time duration) as much of the information is available within the high-context French culture. Highly mobile environments where people come and go need lower-context culture. Note the similarity with Trompenaars' Universalism (low context) and Particularism (high context). Time Monochronic time M-Time, as he called it, means doing one thing at a time. Polychronic time Space Contrasting

Handbook of intercultural training Expanding Your Cultural Intelligence Quiz | RealMagazine – Winter/Spring 2014 Your CQ can be as important as your IQ Few subjects are as massive and complex as culture. Here’s how the American Heritage English Dictionary leads off its definition of the term: “the totality of socially transmitted behavior patterns, arts, beliefs, institutions, and all other products of human work and thought.” The “all other products” qualifier would strain the resources of most anyone’s cultural quotient, or CQ, which global-competence researchers, Linn Van Dyne, Soon Ang and Christine Koh, interpret as an individual’s “capability to function effectively in situations characterized by cultural diversity.” Diversity, of course, at least according to the U.S. education, geographic origin, and skill characteristics.” For the purposes of this quiz, which will begin shortly, culture will be sighted and united by nations. Individualism: This dimension measures the degree of interdependence in a society, distinguishing between self-images based on “I” or “We.” or just let life happen?

Intercultural competence A theoretical construct for cross-cultural competence, language proficiency, and regional expertise. Intercultural competence is the ability to communicate effectively and appropriately with people of other cultures:[1] Appropriately. Valued rules, norms, and expectations of the relationship are not violated significantly.Effectively. In interactions with people from foreign cultures, a person who is interculturally competent understands the culture-specific concepts of perception, thinking, feeling, and acting. Intercultural competence is also called "cross-cultural competence" (3C). Basics[edit] Cultures can be different not only between continents or nations but also within the same company and even within the same family. The basic requirements for intercultural competence are empathy, an understanding of other people's behaviors and ways of thinking, and the ability to express one's own way of thinking. Cross-cultural competence[edit] Immigrants and international students[edit]

Richard Lewis Communications - Negotiating across Cultures “In all negotiations of difficulty, a man may not look to sow and reap at once; but must prepare business, and so ripen it by degrees” – Francis Bacon (1561-1626) ‘Of Negotiating’ Negotiation is probably as old as mankind itself and was born out of Homo Sapiens’ early struggles for survival and dominance. During the last century or so, negotiation has become a science, dominated by the Americans. But anyone who has mediated at, for instance, a Japanese-US joint venture knows that the moment intercultural factors enter the equation, the landscape can change utterly. It has always been advisable to understand the cultural factors in international negotiations. In times of financial crisis, people are under psychological stress and there is a tendency to assert our cultural values more powerfully when under pressure. In international negotiation, cultural preparation to understand different worlds is central to successful strategy and tactics. It is dangerous to rely on our intuitions.

The Eastern Way: How Chinese Philosophy Can Power Innovation in Business Today In spite of spectacular economic growth, China is still afflicted by criticism that its traditional culture inhibits innovation. However, Chinese culture is now changing in response to fundamental techno-economic shifts, and philosophy is not the same as culture. This article shows how an unconventional synthesis of Chinese philosophical systems can power innovation opportunities in 21st century business—and not only for China. China has been a wonder of the global economy for the past three decades. In his January 2011 State of the Union address, President Obama called for a new program of innovation in the U. Innovation is a broad concept and can be defined as, “the implementation of a new or significantly improved product (good or service), or process, a new marketing method, or a new organizational method in business practices, workplace organization, or external relations” (Steven Payson, “Economics of Technological Innovation,” 2010, p. 519). Philosophy and culture are not the same

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