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Hofstede's cultural dimensions theory

Hofstede's cultural dimensions theory
Overview[edit] Hofstede's cultural dimensions theory is a framework for cross-cultural communication. Hofstede developed his original model as a result of using factor analysis to examine the results of a world-wide survey of employee values by IBM in the 1960s and 1970s. The theory was one of the first that could be quantified, and could be used to explain observed differences between cultures. The original theory proposed four dimensions along which cultural values could be analyzed: individualism-collectivism; uncertainty avoidance; power distance (strength of social hierarchy) and masculinity-femininity (task orientation versus person-orientation). Independent research in Hong Kong led Hofstede to add a fifth dimension, long-term orientation, to cover aspects of values not discussed in the original paradigm. History[edit] In 1965, Geert founded the personnel research department of IBM Europe (which he managed until 1971). Dimensions of national cultures[edit]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hofstede%27s_cultural_dimensions_theory

Related:  Intercultural CommunicationCultureMehrsprachigkeitMaladieINTERCULTURAL COMMUNICATION

Academic journal An academic journal is a peer-reviewed periodical in which scholarship relating to a particular academic discipline is published. Academic journals serve as forums for the introduction and presentation for scrutiny of new research, and the critique of existing research.[1] Content typically takes the form of articles presenting original research, review articles, and book reviews. The term academic journal applies to scholarly publications in all fields; this article discusses the aspects common to all academic field journals. Scientific journals and journals of the quantitative social sciences vary in form and function from journals of the humanities and qualitative social sciences; their specific aspects are separately discussed.

Hofstede's consequences: The impact of his work on consulting and business practices An Executive Commentary by John W. Bing Encountering Hofstede's Work The ocean liner Queen Mary is perhaps an odd place to run into the ideas of Geert Hofstede, but that is where I first encountered them, in March of 1982 at a conference of the Society for Intercultural Training, Education and Research (SIETAR). (The Queen Mary is now, and was then, a floating convention center docked off the coast of Southern California.) I attended a session run by Robert Moran and George Renwick, who introduced the basics of Hofstede's research, and the implications of that research, to participants. Using Pattern Recognition to Enhance Memory and Creativity "If seven friends in turn rapidly told him their phone numbers, he could calmly wait until the last digit was spoken and then, from memory, key all seven friends' numbers into his phone's contact list without error." It seems to be the season for fascinating meditations on consciousness, exploring such questions as what happens while we sleep, how complex cognition evolved, and why the world exists. Joining them and prior explorations of what it means to be human is The Ravenous Brain: How the New Science of Consciousness Explains Our Insatiable Search for Meaning (public library) by Cambridge neuroscientist Daniel Bor in which, among other things, he sheds light on how our species' penchant for pattern-recognition is essential to consciousness and our entire experience of life. To illustrate the power of chunking, Bor gives an astounding example of how one man was able to use this mental mechanism in greatly expanding the capacity of his working memory.

Hofstede's Cultural Dimensions - Leadership Training from MindTools Understanding Workplace Values Around the World Learn how to be more sensitive to the needs of people in different cultures. We know that we are living in a global age. Technology has brought everyone much closer together. This means that people of different cultures find themselves working together and communicating more and more. Intercultural competence A theoretical construct for cross-cultural competence, language proficiency, and regional expertise. Intercultural competence is the ability to communicate effectively and appropriately with people of other cultures:[1] Appropriately. Valued rules, norms, and expectations of the relationship are not violated significantly.Effectively. Valued goals or rewards (relative to costs and alternatives) are accomplished.

Organisational Culture The research of Geert Hofstede has shown that cultural differences between nations are particularly found at the deepest level, the level of values. In comparison, cultural differences among organisations are principally identified at the level of practices. Practices are more tangible than values. Organisational Culture can be defined as "the collective programming of the mind that distinguishes the members of one organisation from others." The Organisational Cultural model, further developed by Bob Waisfisz in collaboration with Geert Hofstede, consists of six autonomous dimensions (variables) and two semi-autonomous dimensions. Please note that the model on Organisational Culture that we describe on this website is a derivative of Geert Hofstede's research findings, and therefore not identical to the descriptions of Organisational Culture that can be found in Hofstede's publications.

Why a leading professor of new media just banned technology use in class Stanford professor Cliff Nass discusses his research on multitasking and its effect on the brain in 2009. Nass was a professor of communication at Stanford University, co-creator of the Media Equation theory. He died last year. (Stanford University) Clay Shirky is, as he explains below, a “pretty unlikely candidate for Internet censor.”

Hall's cultural factors Explanations > Culture > Hall's cultural factors Time | Context | Space | So what? Edward T.

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