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Critical thinking

Critical thinking
Critical thinking is a type of clear, reasoned thinking. According to Beyer (1995) Critical thinking means making clear, reasoned judgements. While in the process of critical thinking, ideas should be reasoned and well thought out/judged.[1] The National Council for Excellence in Critical Thinking defines critical thinking as the intellectually disciplined process of actively and skillfully conceptualizing, applying, analyzing, synthesizing, and/or evaluating information gathered from, or generated by, observation, experience, reflection, reasoning, or communication, as a guide to belief and action.'[2] Etymology[edit] In the term critical thinking, the word critical, (Grk. κριτικός = kritikos = "critic") derives from the word critic, and identifies the intellectual capacity and the means "of judging", "of judgement", "for judging", and of being "able to discern".[3] Definitions[edit] According to the field of inquiry [weasel words], critical thinking is defined as: Skills[edit] In sum:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Critical_thinking

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Critical Thinking From The Ground Up Critical Thinking From The Ground Up by John Jensen Images of critical thinking in full bloom abound—teams in furious concentration to send rockets to Mars, the ferment of ideas in businesses like Apple and Google, and the patient concentration of a Nobel Prize-winning scientist. Education’s work, however, is with the early seedlings of these fruits that present fewer pictures. If a child needs a 2-degree course correction to find his way to intellectual greatness, making the change early is easiest and cheapest if we can understand how to guide him. My work has enabled me to observe many children with similar school experiences that seldom include a foundation for critical thinking.

Critical and Creative Thinking - Bloom's Taxonomy What are critical thinking and creative thinking? What's Bloom's taxonomy and how is it helpful in project planning? How are the domains of learning reflected in technology-rich projects? Benjamin Bloom (1956) developed a classification of levels of intellectual behavior in learning.

Debunker A debunker is a person who attempts to expose or discredit claims believed to be false, exaggerated or pretentious.[1] The term is closely associated with skeptical investigation of controversial topics such as U.F.O.s, claimed paranormal phenomena, cryptids, conspiracy theories, alternative medicine, religion, or exploratory or fringe areas of scientific or pseudoscientific research. According to the Merriam-Webster online dictionary, to "debunk" is defined as: To expose the falseness or hollowness of (a myth, idea, or belief).To reduce the inflated reputation of (someone), esp. by ridicule: "comedy takes delight in debunking heroes". If debunkers are not careful, their communications may backfire – increasing an audience's long-term belief in myths.

OECD: Brain & Learning EDUCERI › Centre for Educational Research and Innovation (CERI) - Brain and Learning Is the current classroom model of learning “brain-unfriendly”? Why are students failing to master numeracy and literacy skills efficiently enough to be employable? Why are one out of six students disruptive and school-haters? Since 1999, CERI's “Brain and Learning” project has been working towards a better understanding of the learning processes of an individual’s lifecycle. The first phase of the project (1999 – 2002) brought together an international group of researchers in several fora to review potential implications of recent research findings in brain and learning sciences for policy-makers.

Always be innovating: Preloaded on success, failure and games with purpose - edugameshub I’ve been following the fortunes of games agency Preloaded for several years now, and worked with them on a number of projects. During that time, they’ve grown considerably and had some impressive successes. I wondered: what do they think is behind that success, and what advice might they have for others who want to create educational games? I interviewed their managing director, Paul Canty, to find out his thoughts on this and their new venture showcasing games with purpose. 249 Bloom's Taxonomy Verbs For Critical Thinking Bloom’s Taxonomy’s verbs–also know as power verbs or thinking verbs–are extraordinarily powerful instructional planning tools. In fact, next to the concept of backwards-design and power standards, they are likely the most useful tool a teacher-as-learning-designer has access to. Why?

Skepticism Skepticism or scepticism (see American and British English spelling differences) is generally any questioning attitude towards knowledge, facts, or opinions/beliefs stated as facts,[1] or doubt regarding claims that are taken for granted elsewhere.[2] Philosophical skepticism is an overall approach that requires all information to be well supported by evidence.[3] Classical philosophical skepticism derives from the 'Skeptikoi', a school who "asserted nothing".[4] Adherents of Pyrrhonism, for instance, suspend judgment in investigations.[5] Skeptics may even doubt the reliability of their own senses.[6] Religious skepticism, on the other hand, is "doubt concerning basic religious principles (such as immortality, providence, and revelation)".[7] Definition[edit] In ordinary usage, skepticism (US) or scepticism (UK) (Greek: 'σκέπτομαι' skeptomai, to think, to look about, to consider; see also spelling differences) refers to: Philosophical skepticism[edit] Scientific skepticism[edit]

Intute: Encouraging Critical Thinking Online Encouraging Critical Thinking Online is a set of free teaching resources designed to develop students' analytic abilities, using the Web as source material. Two units are currently available, each consisting of a series of exercises for classroom or seminar use. Students are invited to explore the Web and find a number of sites which address the selected topic, and then, in a teacher-led group discussion, to share and discuss their findings. The exercises are designed so that they may be used either consecutively to form a short course, or individually.

Deeper Learning: Authentic Student Assessment Is it possible to systemically embed deeper learning outcomes for students? Dressed to the nines, Alexis, a senior at an Envision School, stands in front of a panel of adults from his school community -- teachers, counselors, administrators and other school staff -- explaining how his Political Campaign Project analytical paper is not only evidence of his ability to write at a college ready level and demonstrates his knowledge of US Government content standards, it is concrete evidence that he can think critically and communicate effectively. Alexis pulls specific examples from his essay and compares them to the standards addressed in Envision Schools' rubric for Critical Thinking and Communication. The panel questions and probes Alexis thinking through hard evidenced based questions. After conferring as a panel, they certify that Alexis has met the criteria for graduation from his Envision School based on his performance and defense of that work.

Vialogues, a Web 2.0 tool supporting 21st Century learning skills Address: Vialogues is a Web 2.0 tool providing a platform for asynychronous discussions centered around videos. While videos can engage students, the addition of meaningful commentaries increases student learning. This Web 2.0 teaching tool is easy to integrate into the curriculum. Scientific skepticism Carl Sagan, originator of the expression scientific skepticism Scientific skepticism (also spelled scepticism) is the practice of questioning whether claims are supported by empirical research and have reproducibility, as part of a methodological norm pursuing "the extension of certified knowledge".[1] For example, Robert K. Merton asserts that all ideas must be tested and are subject to rigorous, structured community scrutiny (see Mertonian norms).[2] About the term and its scope[edit]

Simplicity Organization makes a system of many appear fewer. The home is usually the first battleground that comes to mind when facing the daily challenge of managing complexity. Stuff just seems to multiply. Survey: Learning '21st-Century Skills' Linked to Work Success - Teaching Now A study released today by the polling firm Gallup Inc. finds that students' exposure to so-called 21st-century skills in school correlates positively with "perceived quality of work" later in life . For the study, which was commissioned by Microsoft Partners in Learning and the Pearson Foundation, Gallup asked 1,014 individuals aged 18 to 35 how much experience they had with certain advanced learning skills during their last year of school, including college or graduate school, if applicable. (Cognitive testing conducted by Gallup prior to the survey determined that individuals at the upper end of the age range would have comparable recall of their last school year.) The skills in question—often dubbed 21st-century skills because of their reputed connection to present-day workplace demands—included collaboration, knowledge construction, global awareness, use of technology for learning, real-world problem solving, and skilled communication.

16 Flipped Classrooms In Action Right Now Flipped classrooms require educators to reconstruct traditional classrooms by sending lectures home and providing more face-to-face time at school, but elementary- through university-level instructors are finding good reasons to try them out. Frequently traced back to Colorado teachers Aaron Sams and JonathanBergmann, who were quick to experiment with posting videos online in 2008, the flipped classroom concept is small, simple and has shown positive results. The general idea is that students work at their own pace, receiving lectures at home via online video or podcasts and then devoting class time to more in-depth discussion and traditional “homework.” Where: Clear Brook High School, Harris County, Texas At the beginning of the school year, geometry teacher Leticia Allred told her Pre-AP Geometry class at Texas’ Clear Brook High School that their only homework would be watching 15-minute YouTube videos and taking notes.

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