background preloader

Intercultural competence

Intercultural competence
A theoretical construct for cross-cultural competence, language proficiency, and regional expertise. Intercultural competence is the ability to communicate effectively and appropriately with people of other cultures:[1] Appropriately. In interactions with people from foreign cultures, a person who is interculturally competent understands the culture-specific concepts of perception, thinking, feeling, and acting. Intercultural competence is also called "cross-cultural competence" (3C). Basics[edit] Cultures can be different not only between continents or nations but also within the same company and even within the same family. The basic requirements for intercultural competence are empathy, an understanding of other people's behaviors and ways of thinking, and the ability to express one's own way of thinking. Cross-cultural competence[edit] Organizations in academia, business, health care, government security, and developmental aid agencies have all sought to use 3C in one way or another. Related:  Intercultural CompetenceINTERCULTURAL COMMUNICATION

Cultural intelligence Cultural Intelligence, cultural quotient or CQ, is a term used in business, education, government and academic research. Cultural intelligence can be understood as the capability to relate and work effectively across cultures. Originally, the term cultural intelligence and the abbreviation "CQ" was developed by the research done by Soon Ang and Linn Van Dyne as a researched-based way of measuring and predicting intercultural performance. The term is relatively recent: early definitions and studies of the concepts were given by P. Cultural intelligence or CQ is measured on a scale, similar to that used to measure an individual's intelligence quotient. Four CQ capabilities[edit] Ang, Van Dyne, & Livermore describe four CQ capabilities: motivation (CQ Drive), cognition (CQ Knowledge), meta-cognition (CQ Strategy) and behavior (CQ Action). CQ-Drive CQ-Drive is a person's interest and confidence in functioning effectively in culturally diverse settings. Cultural intelligence in business[edit]

Hall's cultural factors Explanations > Culture > Hall's cultural factors Time | Context | Space | So what? Edward T. Hall was an anthropologist who made early discoveries of key cultural factors. In particular he is known for his high and low context cultural factors. Context High context In a high-context culture, there are many contextual elements that help people to understand the rules. This can be very confusing for person who does not understand the 'unwritten rules' of the culture. Low context In a low-context culture, very little is taken for granted. Contrasting the two French contracts tend to be short (in physical length, not time duration) as much of the information is available within the high-context French culture. Highly mobile environments where people come and go need lower-context culture. Note the similarity with Trompenaars' Universalism (low context) and Particularism (high context). Time Monochronic time M-Time, as he called it, means doing one thing at a time. Polychronic time Space Contrasting

Intercultural communication Intercultural communication is a form of communication that aims to share information across different cultures and social groups. It is used to describe the wide range of communication processes and problems that naturally appear within an organization made up of individuals from different religious, social, ethnic, and educational backgrounds. Intercultural communication is sometimes used synonymously with cross-cultural communication. In this sense it seeks to understand how people from different countries and cultures act, communicate and perceive the world around them. Cross Cultural Business Communication[edit] Cross Cultural Business Communication is very helpful in building cultural intelligence through coaching and training in cross-cultural communication, cross-cultural negotiation, multicultural conflict resolution, customer service, business and organizational communication. Problems in intercultural communication[edit] Management of intercultural communication[edit]

Intercultural Communication Articles For fresh articles and content visit our blog! Below you will find access to a range of articles relating to cross cultural and intercultural communication. The articles touch upon a number of topics that will be of interest to a wide range of reader involved in intercultural communication such as international business personnel, HR staff, people working in public services and in many other areas where intercultural communication is an issue. Intercultural Training Articles > An Introduction to Intercultural Communication - a basic summary of the purpose of intercultural communication. > Cross Cultural Communication Consultants - A look at the role, skills and qualifications of cross cultural communication consultants. > Definition of Intercultural Communication - what does intercultural communication mean? > Cross Cultural Understanding - an examination of common cross cultural terms and their meanings. > Stereotypes: An Intercultural No-No - why stereotyping is dangerous.

David Livermore | Global Thinker and Author How Intercultural Competence Drives Success in Global Virtual Teams Leveraging global virtual teams through intercultural curiosity, sensitivity, and respect. By David Callen, MSOD 2008 Volume 11 Issue 4 *Winner of the 2008 Graziadio School Student Paper CompetitionOrganizations are increasingly turning to global virtual teams to gain a strategic advantage. We have a stronger team because people have intercultural competence. Image by David Luscombe What is Intercultural Competence? Intercultural competence is the body of knowledge and skills to successfully interact with people from other ethnic, religious, cultural, national, and geographic groups. Global Virtual Teams and Intercultural Competence Intercultural competence is a relatively unexamined aspect of global virtual teams. While intuitively there is a link between a team member’s ability to successfully interact with others and the degree of team effectiveness, based on the findings of the study, organizations are currently not paying attention to intercultural competence as an important factor.

Bennett scale The Bennett scale, also called the DMIS (for Developmental Model of Intercultural Sensitivity), was developed by Dr. Milton Bennett. The framework describes the different ways in which people can react to cultural differences. Organized into six “stages” of increasing sensitivity to difference, the DMIS identifies the underlying cognitive orientations individuals use to understand cultural difference. Each position along the continuum represents increasingly complex perceptual organizations of cultural difference, which in turn allow increasingly sophisticated experiences of other cultures. By identifying the underlying experience of cultural difference, predictions about behavior and attitudes can be made and education can be tailored to facilitate development along the continuum. Developmental Model of Intercultural Sensitivity[edit] Denial of DifferenceIndividuals experience their own culture as the only “real” one. Evolutionary Strategies[edit] Notes[edit] References[edit] Bennett, M.

Hofstede's cultural dimensions theory Overview[edit] Hofstede's cultural dimensions theory is a framework for cross-cultural communication. Hofstede developed his original model as a result of using factor analysis to examine the results of a world-wide survey of employee values by IBM in the 1960s and 1970s. The original theory proposed four dimensions along which cultural values could be analyzed: individualism-collectivism; uncertainty avoidance; power distance (strength of social hierarchy) and masculinity-femininity (task orientation versus person-orientation). Hofstede's work established a major research tradition in cross-cultural psychology and has also been drawn upon by researchers and consultants in many fields relating to international business and communication. History[edit] In 1965, Geert founded the personnel research department of IBM Europe (which he managed until 1971). Dimensions of national cultures[edit] Differences between cultures on the values dimensions[edit] Applications of the model[edit]

Books on Demand Philippines | From an Idea to Your Book, in Minutes! Hofstede's Cultural Dimensions - Leadership Training from MindTools Understanding Workplace Values Around the World Learn how to be more sensitive to the needs of people in different cultures. We know that we are living in a global age. This is exciting, but it can also be frustrating and fraught with uncertainty. Building connections with people from around the world is just one dimension of cultural diversity. How can we understand cultural differences? Fortunately, psychologist Dr Geert Hofstede asked himself this question in the 1970s. With access to people working for the same organization in over 40 countries of the world, he collected cultural data and analyzed his findings. He scored each country using a scale of roughly 0 to 100 for each dimension. The Five Dimensions of Culture Armed with a large database of cultural statistics, Hofstede analyzed the results and found clear patterns of similarity and difference amid the responses along these five dimensions. The five dimensions are: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Note: Hofstede's analysis is done by country.

Netherlands If we explore the Dutch culture through the lens of the 6-D Model©, we can get a good overview of the deep drivers of Dutch culture relative to other world cultures. Power DistanceThis dimension deals with the fact that all individuals in societies are not equal – it expresses the attitude of the culture towards these inequalities amongst us. Power Distance is defined as the extent to which the less powerful members of institutions and organisations within a country expect and accept that power is distributed unequally. The Netherlands scores low on this dimension (score of 38) which means that the following characterises the Dutch style: Being independent, hierarchy for convenience only, equal rights, superiors accessible, coaching leader, management facilitates and empowers. Power is decentralized and managers count on the experience of their team members. Employees expect to be consulted. The Netherlands, with the very high score of 80 is an Individualist society. Indulgence

Related: