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3.9 Hofstede's Cultural Dimensions

3.9 Hofstede's Cultural Dimensions
Understanding Workplace Values Around the World Learn how to be more sensitive to the needs of people in different cultures. We know that we are living in a global age. Technology has brought everyone much closer together. This means that people of different cultures find themselves working together and communicating more and more. This is exciting, but it can also be frustrating and fraught with uncertainty. Building connections with people from around the world is just one dimension of cultural diversity. How can we understand cultural differences? Fortunately, psychologist Dr Geert Hofstede asked himself this question in the 1970s. With access to people working for the same organization in over 40 countries of the world, he collected cultural data and analyzed his findings. He scored each country using a scale of roughly 0 to 100 for each dimension. The Five Dimensions of Culture The five dimensions are: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Note: Hofstede's analysis is done by country. Key Points

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3.8 Greiner Curve - Strategy Tools Surviving the Crises That Come With Growth Growth requires changes at various points. © iStockphoto/PaulGregg Fast-growing companies can often be chaotic places to work. As workloads increase exponentially, approaches which have worked well in the past start failing. Hofstede's consequences: The impact of his work on consulting and business practices An Executive Commentary by John W. Bing Encountering Hofstede's Work The ocean liner Queen Mary is perhaps an odd place to run into the ideas of Geert Hofstede, but that is where I first encountered them, in March of 1982 at a conference of the Society for Intercultural Training, Education and Research (SIETAR). (The Queen Mary is now, and was then, a floating convention center docked off the coast of Southern California.)

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Hofstede's cultural dimensions theory Overview[edit] Hofstede's cultural dimensions theory is a framework for cross-cultural communication. Hofstede developed his original model as a result of using factor analysis to examine the results of a world-wide survey of employee values by IBM in the 1960s and 1970s. The theory was one of the first that could be quantified, and could be used to explain observed differences between cultures. Power Distance Index Hofstede’s Power distance Index measures the extent to which the less powerful members of organizations and institutions (like the family) accept and expect that power is distributed unequally. This represents inequality (more versus less), but defined from below, not from above. It suggests that a society’s level of inequality is endorsed by the followers as much as by the leaders. For example, Germany has a 35 on the cultural scale of Hofstede’s analysis. Compared to Arab countries where the power distance is very high (80) and Austria where it very low (11), Germany is somewhat in the middle. Germany does not have a large gap between the wealthy and the poor, but have a strong belief in equality for each citizen.

3.2 Blake Mouton Managerial Grid Balancing Task- and People-Oriented Leadership © iStockphotoanthonyjhall When your boss puts you in charge of organizing the company Christmas party, what do you do first? Do you develop a time line and start assigning tasks, or do you think about who would prefer to do what, and try to schedule around their needs? When the planning starts to fall behind schedule, what is your first reaction? Organisational Culture The research of Geert Hofstede has shown that cultural differences between nations are particularly found at the deepest level, the level of values. In comparison, cultural differences among organisations are principally identified at the level of practices. Practices are more tangible than values. Organisational Culture can be defined as "the collective programming of the mind that distinguishes the members of one organisation from others." The Organisational Cultural model, further developed by Bob Waisfisz in collaboration with Geert Hofstede, consists of six autonomous dimensions (variables) and two semi-autonomous dimensions.

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