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Brene Brown: The power of vulnerability

Brene Brown: The power of vulnerability

Five Keys to Successful Social and Emotional Learning Pamela Randall: Social-emotional skills are the essential skills for success in school, work and life. Natalie Walchuk: Social-emotional learning centers their mind and body. It reduces their emotional tension, so they can be open to new content and material. We find that academic outcomes increase exponentially when students are nurtured, loved and cared for. Pamela: If we expect students to be college and career ready, it's important for us to focus on these skills and competencies: Self-Awareness; Self-Management; Social Awareness; Relationship Skills; and Responsible Decision-Making. Natalie: We find that Self-Awareness is one of the hardest things for young people. Pamela: Self-Management is the ability to self-motivate, to have self-control, to regulate one's emotions. Natalie: In a classroom, that may be a breathing exercise, or that might be counting to five, or taking a break. Pamela: Social Awareness is about embracing diversity, showing empathy for others. Student: No.

What works in education – Hattie’s list of the greatest effects and why it matters I have been a fan of John Hattie’s work ever since I encountered Visible Learning. Hattie has done the most exhaustive meta-analysis in education. Thanks to him, we can gauge not only the relative effectiveness of almost every educational intervention under the sun but we can compare these interventions on an absolute scale of effect size. Perhaps most importantly, Hattie was able to identify a ‘hinge point’ (as he calls it) from exhaustively comparing everything: the effect size of .40. The caveat in any meta-anlysis, of course, is that we have little idea as to the validity of the underlying research. Fans of the book may be unaware that a brand new Hattie book has just been released entitled Visible Learning for Teachers: Maximizing Impact on Learning. As in Visible Learning, the (updated) rank order of those factors that have the greatest effect size in student achievement will be of interest to every teacher, administrator, and education professor. Like this: Like Loading...

20% Time In My Classroom I'm really excited to get started with my 20 Time set up in my classroom. I've talked to teachers in my department and many of them said they are going to find a way to use in their class for the second semester. I've used tons of great resources to make this happen and have tweaked things to make it fit my teaching style and my students. Students will have every Friday to work on a project that is new to them and they are passionate about. These are the rough basics for 20 Time in my classroom. If you are interested in doing 20 Time in your class, please check out these resources. I'll be tweeting about my adventures in 20 Time and you can follow them on the hash tag #GP20Time. Nick The Myth of 'I'm Bad at Math' - Miles Kimball & Noah Smith “I’m just not a math person.” We hear it all the time. And we’ve had enough. Is math ability genetic? How do we know this? Different kids with different levels of preparation come into a math class. Thus, people’s belief that math ability can’t change becomes a self-fulfilling prophecy. The idea that math ability is mostly genetic is one dark facet of a larger fallacy that intelligence is mostly genetic. A body of research on conceptions of ability has shown two orientations toward ability. The “entity orientation” that says “You are smart or not, end of story,” leads to bad outcomes—a result that has been confirmed by many other studies. You have a certain amount of intelligence, and you really can’t do much to change it. They found that students who agreed that “You can always greatly change how intelligent you are” got higher grades. The results? For almost everyone, believing that you were born dumb—and are doomed to stay that way—is believing a lie. So why do we focus on math? 1.

5 Powerful Questions Teachers Can Ask Students My first year teaching a literacy coach came to observe my classroom. After the students left, she commented on how I asked the whole class a question, would wait just a few seconds, and then answer it myself. "It's cute," she added. So that day, I learned about wait/think time. Many would agree that for inquiry to be alive and well in a classroom that, amongst other things, the teacher needs to be expert at asking strategic questions, and not only asking well-designed ones, but ones that will also lead students to questions of their own. I also learned over the years that asking straightforward, simply-worded questions can be just as effective as those intricate ones. #1. This question interrupts us from telling too much. #2. After students share what they think, this follow-up question pushes them to provide reasoning for their thinking. #3. When this question is asked, students can make connections to their ideas and thoughts with things they've experienced, read, and have seen. #4.

The Best 1:1 Device is a Good Teacher Photo credit: iStockPhoto Over the course of two years, I, along with the Burlington Public Schools tech team, had the opportunity to meet and connect with over one hundred schools. These discussions would usually involve what device works best in the classroom and how the iPad is affecting teaching and learning outcomes. Frequently this conversation focuses on the most effective hardware for teaching and learning. While this is an important decision to make, it should not be the focus. In fact, the best devices a school can employ are great teachers. Smashing the State of the Art We have reached a point in education technology where devices are, for the most part, adaptable. This hypothetical simulation is a great example of how little hardware actually matters any more. Innovation on the Fly To illustrate the points I’ve made, I'll share a true story. Self-Paced Professional Development Here are some options for self-paced, learn-when-you-can professional development. iTunesU Coursera

27 Ways To Assess Background Knowledge 27 Ways To Assess Background Knowledge Assessing background knowledge is an often misunderstood idea, and subsequently fumbled as a process. Background knowledge is a product of the experiences–academic and otherwise–that a student brings to a lesson. These provide both knowledge in terms of content, as well as schema in terms of analogs students can use to make sense of new ideas. The purpose of assessing background knowledge is not to get everyone on the “same page,” but rather to make visible the nature of what a student knows (rather than a list or academic labels like “proficient). From a planning point of view, it can also allow teachers to identify knowledge gaps, prioritize standards, and revise imminent lessons and units in response. Mia MacMeekin created the following infographic that offers 27 ways to assess background knowledge. 27 Ways To Assess Background Knowledge

Found in: 2013 - (Remenyi) Case Study Research: The Quick Guide Series

Brown B, 6 October (2011), Stories are data with a soul, TEDxTalk,
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