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Six Things

Six Things
Six Things A Miscellany of English Language Teaching Methods & madness Recent Posts Six ways of letting unplugged teaching through the coursebook door Words & stuff Recent Posts Six phrases beginner English students should learn right away

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types of questions The importance of teaching reading: Teaching reading in the English language course should include the following set of learning goals: 1- enable students to read a wide range of texts in English. 2- develop awareness of the structures of the written English texts. 3- develop the ability of criticizing the content of texts. 4- practice different types of reading according to the purpose of reading. The Rapid eLearning Blog - Practical, real-world tips for e-learning success. Creating great interactive learning experiences requires a few core building blocks: relevant content, pull versus push, and real-world decisions. With those building blocks you're able to structure effective learning scenarios that are meaningful to the learner and helps meet the objectives of the course. One of those building blocks in creating relevant content or content that is placed in a meaningful context. Essentially, you want to recreate the types of scenarios that are similar to the ones the learner has in real life.

The Best Videos For Educators In 2011 This is always one of my favorite year-end lists to do….. You might also be interested in: Part Two Of The Best Videos For Educators — 2010 The Ten Best Videos For Educators — 2010 And you might also want to see The Best Funny Videos Showing The Importance Of Being Bilingual — Part One and The Best Videos Illustrating Qualities Of A Successful Language Learner. English Raven The idea of disintermediation ("cutting out the middle man") in terms of professional qualifications has been slowly but surely gathering steam in a variety of fields. Take a look at a range of Position Descriptions for new jobs these days and phrases along the lines of Tertiary qualifications in a relevant discipline, or equivalent experience and expertise/skills are becoming more frequent. Private companies (as we might expect) have been quicker to apply this in practice rather than rhetoric compared to educational institutions, mired as most of them are in conservative paper-reliant processes for verifying applicants' skills, but even here we are starting to see change. As university qualifications become more expensive and fail to deliver effective ROI for the people who invest their time and money in them, the idea of cutting them out of the picture partly or wholly is becoming not only more attractive, but more feasible. Branding is still important, however. A.

Obama's victory speech By Rosie McAndrew This comprehensive lesson plan by Rosie McAndrew, available at intermediate and advanced levels, focuses on the final part of Barack Obama's presidential victory speech. Students complete pre- and post-listening activities, including a focus on the literary style of the speech and Internet-based research tasks. You can see the full video of Obama's victory speech in the following places:

* Motivation 1 An article by Dörnyei and Csizer (1999) “Ten commandments for motivating language learners: results of an empirical study” in the LTR journal ( (see the Articles section of this website for a copy) predates all Dörnyei’s more recent work, where he develops an “integrated theory” of motivation (see, for example, Dörnyei, Z., & Ushioda, E. (2011). Teaching and researching motivation (2nd ed.). Harlow: Longman). The authors say in the abstract “Two hundred Hungarian teachers of English from various language teaching institutions were asked how important they considered a selection of 51 strategies and how frequently they used them in their teaching practice. Based on their responses we have compiled a concise set of ten motivational macrostrategies, which we have called the ‘Ten commandments for motivating language learners’” It makes interesting reading because it seems very intuitive, almost obvious.

for teachers by teachers by David Dodgson “But you only teach six lessons a day and you have a guaranteed summer holiday…” Ah, the common misconception that being a teacher is somehow an “easy” job! We all know the truth, however. We know that those six hours in the classroom are intense, full hours; we know that those six hours are supported by more hours of planning and preparing; we know that those six hours are followed by marking and reviewing; and we know that those “guaranteed” weekends and holidays often include training and development. We devote ourselves to the task regardless.

Schools BoomWriter lets you easily incorporate and experience the benefits of technology as your students are engaged in the following (or similar) standards-based learning activities: Grade 3 CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.3.3 - Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, descriptive details, and clear event sequences. Using BoomWriter’s feature allowing teachers to create their own story start, students collaboratively create imagined multi-paragraph personal narratives using a teacher generated prompt (e.g. “When I woke up on Saturday morning, I had no idea I was in for the craziest day of my entire life…”).

Ellclassroom Over the course of my 15 years of teaching in the classroom, there has been a continual debate over management vs. engagement. The argument is that if you create an engaging lesson, then management issues will fade away like a bad stain in the washing machine. The opposite has also been stated, if you have good management then “engagement” (which has been confused with compliance, in this instance), also increases. We need to look beyond the either/or to the both/and. A classroom should have good student management in place, but it should also include lessons/activities that are engaging. It is very difficult to have one without the other.

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