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Eight Ways to Spot Emotional Manipulation

Eight Ways to Spot Emotional Manipulation
1) There is no use in trying to be honest with an emotional manipulator. You make a statement and it will be turned around. Example: I am really angry that you forgot my birthday. Response - "It makes me feel sad that you would think I would forget your birthday, I should have told you of the great personal stress I am facing at the moment - but you see I didn’t want to trouble you. You are right I should have put all this pain (don’t be surprised to see real tears at this point) aside and focused on your birthday. Sorry." 2) An emotional manipulator is the picture of a willing helper. 3) Crazy making - saying one thing and later assuring you they did not say it. 4) Guilt. 5) Emotional manipulators fight dirty. 6) If you have a headache an emotional manipulator will have a brain tumor! 7) Emotional manipulators somehow have the ability to impact the emotional climate of those around them. 8) Emotional manipulators have no sense of accountability.

http://www.friedgreentomatoes.org/articles/emotional_manipulation.php

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