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British National Corpus (BYU-BNC)

British National Corpus (BYU-BNC)

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The 6 Best Word Cloud Tools for Teachers Word cloud tools are part and parcel of teachers' digital tool kit.Their importance stems from the fact they are web based and can be access anywhere with an internet connection. There are a variety of reasons why you as a teacher and educator should use them with your students and here some of these reasons : You can use them to create infographic-like visualisations to enhance students learningYou can create out of them nice posters to use in the classroomYou can use them to brainstorm a certain study topic They are also useful in teaching vocabularyThey might be used as post-reading activity to test students understanding of the textCreate a class word cloud that highlights class expectationPost students first names to create a class or group word cloud 1- Tagxedo

DCPSE The Diachronic Corpus of Present-Day Spoken English funded by DCPSE is a new parsed corpus of spoken English available on CD-ROM. It contains more than 400,000 words from ICE-GB (collected in the early 1990s) and 400,000 words from the London-Lund Corpus (late 1960s-early 1980s). Online 10 questions–see how your score compares The visual vocab quiz The commonly misspelled words quiz Concordancers in ELT This has enabled linguists to create and analyse huge corpora (collections of authentic language text) and to reassess the assumed rules regarding the way we use language and especially words. With the spread of the Internet, these corpora are now becoming available to any teacher or student with an Internet connection, opening up a vast resource for language learning. What is a concordancer? How can concordancers help us? Ideas for using concordancers with students Some possible problems Conclusion What is a concordancer?

How to write vocabulary activities By Philip Kerr In an extract from ELT Teacher2Writer’s training module, Philip Kerr offers some helpful tips on how to go about writing vocabulary activities, considering word selection, word frequency and grouping vocabulary items. Preliminary questions | Which vocabulary items? | Task 1: Word frequency | How should we group vocabulary items? DCPSE Research Project - Download Data Creating a parsed and searchable diachronic corpus of present-day spoken English funded by Download data The complete DCPSE corpus is available on CD-ROM from the Survey of English Usage.

WebCorp: The Web as Corpus WebCorp Live lets you access the Web as a corpus - a large collection of texts from which examples of real language use can be extracted. More... Have you tried WebCorp LSE? Our large-scale search engine with more search options, part-of-speech tags and quantitative analyses. More details... English Tips Blog words, useful phrases and idioms You've probably already learned that we can use -ED adjectives to describe how a person feels, and -ING adjectives to describe the thing, person, situation, or event that causes the feeling: I'm tired. My job is very tiring. "tired" describes "I", and "tiring" describes "job" We're bored. This movie is boring. "bored" describes "we", and [...]

Presidential Candidates Debates: Presidential Debate at Hofstra University in Hempstead, New York [moderated by Bob Schieffer of CBS News] SCHIEFFER: Good evening. And welcome to the third and last presidential debate of 2008, sponsored by the Commission on Presidential Debates. Lingo Education Learning vocabulary is one of the most important steps of learning a second language. Acquiring an extensive vocabulary is one of the biggest challenges in learning a second language. Whether in one's native language or a second language, the acquisition of new vocabulary is a continual process. Reading is a very effective way to increase your vocabulary - especially if you can read about things that are interesting to you.

Is "futurecation" education's answer to duffins? Forget twerking. The real surprise trend of 2013 has been composite words. There was the cronut, the hybrid croissant-doughnut developed in New York. The duffin, a doughnut-muffin, made a similar impact in London baking circles. And then there were jeggings: a cross between jeans and leggings. And now composite words have made it to education. BAWE (British Academic Written English) and BAWE Plus Collections Overview of BAWE The British Academic Written English (BAWE) corpus was created through a project entitled 'An investigation of genres of assessed writing in British Higher Education' from 2004 – 2007. This project was funded by the Economic and Social Research Council (Project number RES-000-23-0800) and was a collaboration between the Universities of Warwick, Reading and Oxford Brookes. The BAWE corpus contains 2761 pieces of proficient assessed student writing, ranging in length from about 500 words to about 5000 words. Holdings are fairly evenly distributed across four broad disciplinary areas (Arts and Humanities, Social Sciences, Life Sciences and Physical Sciences) and across four levels of study (undergraduate and taught masters level). Thirty-five disciplines are represented.

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